Questions and Answers about Boeing

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What is the work environment and culture like at Boeing?

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Boeing is no longer the same company that I started working for ten years ago. Several years ago executive management (CEOs) decided that stock prices were more valuable than the employees who had built the company into the giant that it is today. To that end there the constant layoffs (my program had 3500 employees 5 years ago, now it has 1200 and no reduction in the workload), a push to outsource as much work as possible overseas, steady benefit erosion, frozen promotions, little to no raises, and the "do more with less" attitude has resulted on a hollowed out company with terrible worker moral. Additionally, a lot of the people who are left are more concerned about surviving the next round of layoffs that being productive which has resulted in little kingdoms where you have to constantly watch your back. This has created a very political work environment where the focus is on being the manager's favorite.

When I started, the culture was one that was focused on the employees, their work/life balance, professional development, upward mobility and a corporate attitude of employee satisfaction. A few years ago that totally changed to a management centric culture where the employees (non-management) are viewed as liabilities that need to be cut for management bonuses and increasing stock prices, raises were practically frozen while promotions were completely frozen. The result has been that Boeing is now hemorrhaging mid career personnel. Young people fresh out of college now only stay with the company a few years to be able to put Boeing on their resume then are gone. There is no reason for them to stay as they can do better elsewhere.

While Boeing has been steadily cutting employee benefits, the company still offers fair to good benefits overall; however, executive management is working hard to eliminate any benefits that their competition doesn't have. Their thinking is that if Boeing's benefit package is the same as their competition then people will stay.

While the work is still interesting, and there are some amazing products to be involved with, much of the new work is being quietly shipped overseas to further cut US costs. In good conscious, the best that I can say that Boeing offers college grads a great starting point, but they should be very careful about considering the company as a career.

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If you are a woman, you are allowed to work there, but don't expect to be listened to or respected. Women do a lot of the detail oriented and mess clean up while the men grandstand and talk big.
On the other hand, the pay is worth it compared to other engineering firms. Benefits are not great though.
Renton WA wrote "A lot of extra work and stress for some employees so that others could put in short work days." I agree.

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Experts in creating and maintain their products which are complete and work and function as needed and wanted.

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As led by the senior engineers this team of people will coordinate to assure that each and every person can take leadership without need for supervision. Those team members have a pleasant ability to present symposium speeches and training for all to understand and learn quickly and totally. All regulatory agencies and government groups should see and understand that Boeing is doing the job that is needed without error or further questions.

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Working at Boeing is like the global economy. Some places are great, some places are not so great. Supplier Management is probably the worst, while Business Operations is better than most. Boeing claims that its strength is being the supplier integrator, but we have no clue in how to manage our suppliers. We just throw money and resources at it to muscle it through. We waste millions of dollars to oversee suppliers, but hardly see any return on investment. We have onsite quality teams, onsite supplier management teams, and procurement teams all bickering and stepping on each other toes. My job in supplier management was to update wall charts daily no one looked at, write daily reports no one read, and sit in meetings with the supplier all day, so they couldn't get anything done. Not really, but that's what I was told to do. I worked for a manager who managed by fear and intimidation. He would treat the suppliers with disrespect, and his employees even worse. He would using his company credit card to buy lunch for the people he liked. The director would come attend meetings with the supplier all hung over and reeking with alcohol... The only good thing is that when times are good, it's fairly easy to change jobs.

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It's a fun place to work if you're competent at your job.

Answered - Assembly Mechanic (Former Employee) - Renton, WA, Everett, WA

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Culture is difficult to figure out because there is not a unified culture for the organization, everyone sees each other as their own threat.

Answered - Marketing (Former Employee) - St. Louis, MO

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Horrible. Lazy employees. Senior managers who like to throw out buzzwords and have absolutely no plans of backing their grand ideas.

Answered - Software Manager (Current Employee) - NA

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Office sitting, orientations were conducted in the auditorium sometime sitting over people.

Answered - Human Resource Specialist (Former Employee) - Seattle, WA

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Great in my experience but it’s a very large company.

Answered - Senior Exhibit Designer (Former Employee) - Seattle, WA

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