CVS Health Employee Reviews

Found 9,292 reviews matching the search
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
CVS, my personal anecdote, the people can make it an enjoyable experience
Pharmacy Technician (Current Employee) –  Houston, TXFebruary 5, 2015
Honestly, I will start off by saying, I actually really enjoy my job. I enjoy what I do, who I do it with, and the person's I have the privilege to interact with when I work whether it be fellow co-workers or customers. I actually love my job. Sounds hokey. I really get a kick out of what I do, but I didn't say I loved CVS as a company.
All I will say about CVS is that they are a Fortune 500 company. CVS was ranked 12th last year on that list. It sounds nice for sure working for a company ranked so highly acclaimed. But I will allow you to create your own preconceived notions on how they are as an employer. Although they have hired some decent people with whom I again have the privilege to work with.
My experience as a technician has been molded by the people I've been surrounded with while having CVS as an employer. I have a lot of positive things to say.
A lot of your experience depends upon how well you interact with the pharmacy team and that specific pharmacy's demographic.
In fact, the gentleman who hired me was a Pharmacist In Charge (PIC) of his own store for and he gave me the opportunity to work as a technician when he didn't have to, which I will forever be grateful for. I had no work experience in health care prior to this opportunity and after gaining essentially an on the job training license through the state of Texas he hired me on (that whole process took about a month and a half; fingerprinting, background check, etc.)
Job work/Life Balance will be dependent upon how many hours you are willing to work as well as how much your employer will be able to provide
  more... you. This can be flexible, but it has to be communicated to your Pharmacist who schedules you in. But if that pharmacy is low on manpower, expect to be working full time. When I first worked then, the gentleman who hired me wasn't able to give me full time hours because I was initially going to inherit a technician's hours who was planning on leaving, but they ended up staying. So I had the ability to float to pharmacies that needed help. Keep in mind, a lot of pharmacies are understaffed and assistance is always appreciated. I won't get into details but some locations seem to have great difficulty getting hours for people and budget for staffing pharmacies adequately. Its very frustrating when a pharmacy is expected to uphold these metrics and standards when there is only a few working at an already understaffed pharmacy. You can fill in the blanks.
Job Security alone is pretty high unless you break the rules. But again CVS pharmacies are normally understaffed, the turn over rate isn't high. Advancement alone I would give a rather low rating. Once you become a technician, unless you have aspirations to become a Pharmacist, that's pretty much it aside from your annual reviews and rather unimpressive raises. You can apply to become a Lead Technician which of course have more responsibility with a marginal pay grade raise. You could even apply to be an Inventory Specialist, but sadly, any monetary bonuses are nonexistent, just more hours and more responsibilities for the same pay. Looks nice on a resume though. Of course these are positions you can literally talk with about your Pharmacist in Charge at your pharmacy, how you bring up the conversation topic will be strictly upon you. If they like you and you're competent, it should be a relatively easy conversation topic unless those positions are filled.
Compensation and Benefits are not too bad. You receive a relatively decent discount for items in the store for being an employee at CVS. I'm sure there are even perks in getting your own scripts at a CVS or your own pharmacy you work at as well as those Minute Clinics if you have one neighboring you. I don't take medications so I can't give you a personal anecdote on that one though. You do get those annual flu shots free, which is nice, if you believe in those. CVS does provide their employees with health insurance, but I think that is for full time employees only. Personally, I have my own insurance though.
The Job Culture will again be dependent upon whom you're working with and for at your location. I can comfortably say throughout CVS, the employees whether it be in the Front Store or Pharmacy have been very pleasant people. It can be a fun place to work. CVS and usually the employers there seem to keep up with the times and celebrate holidays and current events that take place. Job culture exists as much as it can in a pharmacy.
Your typical work day will consist mostly of clearing the production queue (prescriptions that need to be filled), and checking out customers. You will type up prescriptions as well, deal with rejection issues, insurance companies, doctor's offices, etc. too. You usually have the Pharmacist and one designated tech to collectively settle those bumps in the road. Those are essentially the main duties in a nut shell. You learn all of them while you're there. If you have prior work experience in a pharmacy, it may help you. I learned all of these things as well as the little intricacies that go with each task through the varying pharmacy teams I worked with. I'd say they were all very patient and very accommodating and I will never forget that. The neat thing about working in a Pharmacy is that it requires patience in order most efficiently do your job. If you have a decent work ethic you should seamlessly transition into the work flow.
This all sounds nice and dandy, but the work all at once can feel extremely overwhelming sometimes. Especially when you are short staffed. Through experience and number of times you deal with it you realize there is only so much you can do about it and then can inevitably not let the situations overwhelm and stress you out. It takes at least 3-6 months to actually feel comfortable with what you're doing. It's okay to have lots of questions because how else will you learn? It's always better to do something slow and correctly rather than fast and haphazard. If you have a question ask it. If you don't know something ask the Pharmacist.
Overall working in a pharmacy is a great job if you have the patience to accommodate people with your charming people skills if you have any and can calmly deal with irate person's who are trying to consistently get their narcotics filled. The person interaction is my favorite part. The work that comes with it can feel stressful and overwhelming at times. But don't let it get you down. You are helping people, they need their maintenance medications.
Also be prepared to stand on your feet all day. No one sits down.
  less
Pros
the people you work with as well as the customers, job security, employee discount
Cons
stand all day, short break, can be busy and feel overwhelming, no real advancement, unimpressive pay (unless you're the pharmacist)
Was this review helpful?Yes75No9
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Busy retail atmosphere in a corporate facilitated work and training environment
Store Certified Pharmacy Technician (Current Employee) –  Millerton, NYNovember 9, 2014
My duties at CVS health alternate between a position in the pharmacy as a pharmacy tech, and a position in the retail portion of the store, as a store associate. When I work in the pharmacy, a typical day of work is never predictable. Duties fluctuate depending on the different workstations I might be assigned to, and workstations alternate throughout the shift. I am often covering the pick-up workstation, where I find and ring out patients prescriptions, in addition to working at production in between customers, which entails counting pills and the first stage of filling prescriptions for the pharmacist. There is also the drop off workstation, where I take and enter prescriptions into the RX database for the pharmacist. This is the most demanding workstation, as many unpredictable snags can come up in trying to fill patients prescriptions through insurance, and thus at times requires extra phone work and coordination with insurance companies, as well as prioritizing these rejections among other tasks. There are always questions and issues and lots of trouble shooting. It can be very chaotic, but also exciting.

In the retail portion of the store I help out both with cash register and floor duties. Most of the time I am working on the floor and assigned to field back up pages when there is heavy traffic. While assigned to the floor I take part in stocking the week's delivery, as well as fielding questions from customers, helping them find products and answering questions about products. On Wednesday nights I assist one of the floor supervisors with the truck shipment, which
  more... mainly entails organizing items in the back room and the storage area in the basement.

I find CVS to be a very good basic professional learning environment. In the pharmacy portion of the store I completed work station training modules and knowledge checks on pharmacy laws and regulations. I learned how to count out and fill prescriptions carefully and accurately. I learned how to navigate different workstations and maneuvers in the RX database, how to enter, and pre-enter prescriptions, how to interpret error messages or flags, how to trouble shoot with patients based on these errors in the system. In the retail portion of the store I've been learning about the different sales seasons, about handling cash, and about the stock rotation process. Working in both portions of the store I've learned, probably most importantly, how to keep a smile on my face and keep my head during moments of chaos and high traffic, for unhappy customers, and during transaction or insurance adjudication problems.

The management team is very multifaceted, if you count the corporate hierarchies of my store's district, and if you count the team of floor supervisors and the pharmacists, The manager of the store has been with the company for over 30 years. In addition to her, there are five shift supervisors, a position like an assistant manager with duties like opening and closing store, key holding responsibilities, and authorization to approve certain specific maneuvers at the cashlane.Management also handles the cash lanes and store cash terminals in the pharmacy.

There are two pharmacists at my store, one is the pharmacy supervisor, who oversees the operation of the pharmacy and the pharmacy staff, and then an additional pharmacist who doesn't have those other administrative duties.

Management extends beyond store in both pharmacy and retail portions. There is a store district manager who manages the retail portion of stores in our area, and a separate pharmacy supervisor who oversees the pharmacy. There are extensive statistics that they keep track of for each store, which are especially complex for the pharmacy. The district supervisors also let us know about recurring or new training modules that need to be fulfilled.

My coworkers and I function as a team first. We work well together, backing each other up, providing assistance, and supporting each other with intervening personal issues. There is an equal balance between working closely as a team and working individually on store tasks. I get along with everyone pretty well and am happy with who I work with.

The hardest part of the job is probably fielding questions on topics I'm less familiar with, or handling something like a flag or error message in the pharmacy system I've never seen before, and having to ask another preoccupied team member for help. This happens to everyone, as I've seen.

The most enjoyable part of the job in the pharmacy portion of the store for me is entering or editing a customer's new insurance information, and having the listed price of the particular reduce significantly before their eyes once it goes through. Or being able to find and provide information about a product that fits the customer's needs precisely.
  less
Pros
dental care, employee discount, short commute
Cons
fluctuating hours and schedule, unsatisfactory pay, few benefits
Was this review helpful?Yes32No4
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
GREAT BENEFITS! SEE REVIEW!
Store Manager (Former Employee) –  NCApril 2, 2015
Expectations for success at CVS/Pharmacy (in my opinion):

*Must place work above all else. Your personal life is not the company's concern.

*Must be available 24/7 365. The store is open every day/holiday of the year and alarm calls/problems happen often. It doesn't matter if you closed the store at 11pm and have to open at 7am and you get a 3am alarm call, you must respond.

*Your store operational hours will likely be about 210 open hours a week and your payroll will be 210hrs a week. You can not go over, you may not use overtime, holiday weeks are no exception! Your cashier will be at the register their entire shift and that leaves the manager on duty with every other aspect of a 15,000sqft store including; Plano-grams 3-4 per week at (4-12hrs average per plano-gram), customer service, misc (ringing, covering breaks, photo processing, vendor check-in, truck unload and put away (400-500 totes/week), back-fill product, display building, hiring, firing, coaching/training, cleaning bathrooms/vacuuming/straightening/fixing/etc, ordering, paperwork, price changes, inventory counts, store walk-throughs, loss prevention, payroll, etc)

*You will have a small staff of 3-6 staff making $8/hr which you can never schedule over 29hrs and rarely offer full time and never offer off cycle increases for performance. Your support shift managers will leave with each better offer they get.

*The store may never close outside of its posted hours. Store manager covers all call outs (cashier/management/etc), neighboring stores are just as short staffed and not willing to help. Expect
  more... to live at the store during bad weather (blizzards, snow/ice, hurricanes, etc)

*Expect to work 6-7 day work weeks and at least 12hr days up to 16+ hr days. I know your salary says 45/hrs, it's just what we tell new people to get them to work here but reality is 60+hrs on a light week and 90+ on rough weeks.

*We offer paid holidays! We simply subtract 8hrs from your 45hr pay, create a new line that says "holiday pay" and add it there. No you actually still work 45+ hrs and if it's a major holiday like Christmas, Thanksgiving, Valentine's, etc then you will likely work every day that week and more like 90hrs that we talked about. But you'll feel good that on paper you got to take those 8hrs off!

*We offer vacation/paid time off! It won't roll over at the end of the year and you won't really get to use it since you would have to get coverage (see above about call outs, etc) but we do offer it.

*Being a pharmacy and seeing so many ill customers we offer unlimited/paid sick time! Awesome right? Well you'll still have to come and work because...see above about call outs and not closing, etc.

*We offer stock options! We will give some to you every other year BUT you can't exercise them for at least 3 years and if you leave or get terminated we take them back..But they look pretty in your portfolio while you're here.

*BONUSES!!!!!! Start rolling in the money! Well, you do have to meet all your budgets for the year (they aren't tough, we really do think you can do 10% over your missed budgets from last year. Just work harder!) and if you make your budget we'll give you 80% of your bonus and then minus off for service missed targets, missed scoring metrics and then 50% to Uncle Sam and that $10,000 bonus looks more like $2,000 but you still got a bonus! But don't take any time off to spend it! That's not allowed. There's always next year to do better!

*We do offer unlimited audits! We offer monthly outside audits for expired products, pricing issues, ADA and safety. There are 2 daily store manager audits, and 2 daily loss prevention audits. Weekly hazard audits, Loss prevention audits, etc. You'll also have monthly District manager audits and quarterly (or more) outside loss prevention audits! You'll have yearly WIC audits from the county, Fire audits from the Fire dept, Price audits from the State and various other agencies (DEA, Board of pharmacy, etc). EVERYONE gets an audit! You get an audit, and they get an audit, lots of audits to go around! BUT fail any and you're fired! Don't worry though! You won't know when the audits are coming so you won't have to stress and worry about having a job at the end of that day!

*We do offer medical, dental and prescription insurance! It is an HSA and you will have to pay out of pocket for all of those things until you reach a $10,000 deductible and the family paycheck contribution will about just over $100 per check. But I found my average doctor check up to be about $400 out of pocket so you should have no problem getting to $10,000 with a family in a year. Just set that $10,000 aside since you won't have any vacations to take, etc. You and your spouse are also required to have a company medical exam at a company only clinic where they take your medical history, etc and compile it. (I'm sure it really is confidential and no one would REALLY look at it) or you face a $1200/yr fine deducted from your pay check each pay period.

ALL OF THE ABOVE CAN BE YOURS...IF...CVS is your next employer! Apply at CVS.com/careers to take advantage of our amazing benefits and working culture!
  less
Was this review helpful?Yes85No9
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
unprofessional pharmacy environment
Pharmacist (Former Employee) –  Gainesville, flOctober 31, 2014
The CVS 'culture' is more unprofessional than you can possibly imagine. I use the analogy of military training, where they break you down to build you back up. The difference is, at CVS, they don't build you back up. It is their plan not to. It is their plan it break down the pharmacist mentally and undervalue and under mind their professionalism because after all, CVS doesn't view their pharmacists as an asset, but an unwanted expense. Changing their name to CVS HEALTH is a huge front for something that couldn't be more non-health oriented. If they wanted their pharmacist to take on more of a health-professional role, they would staff the pharmacy to accommodate. They can afford it, have you seen the stock lately. Pharmacists are constantly drilled to achieve daily script counts that are impossible because we cant MAKE UP scripts. We are constantly told that we 'CANT AFFORD TO LOOSE A SINGLE SCRIPT' One of the most unmotivating things corporate can do to its leaders is to set goals that are consistently unrealistic and unobtainable. Therefore the CVS culture became inventing new ways to cheat the system and make your numbers look good. We are told to check with other stores that have good numbers, but low and behold they have all been fired due to illegal activity no doubt. The supervisors never would have let someone go who was making them look good with good numbers.
My typical day consisted of 14 hours straight, in the morning, working the drive-thru by myself with no help and setting the pace on production, and not being relieved until there were at least 2 other techs
  more... there. Yes, pharmacist alone in drive through for about 4 hours in the morning, AND 4 hours before close. It doesn't matter if the techs weren't doing anything. My supervisor would right ME up if I asked them to do anything. My LEAD technician refused to follow the work assignment board, and when asked to do so, yelled at me, and waved the phone in my face (which she had picked up to make a call at other end of the pharmacy after 3 people lined up at her register) I was written up for writing her up. I was also written up for writing up a tech what refused to take ID's at drop off for controlled substances and mouthed off to me about it. He was told by management not to sign his write up. I was written up a third time for writing up an employee who refused to help or acknowledge a customer in her drive through. I told her she could either help the customer or clock out and leave. She then called in a fake customer complaint and claimed I was rude to her. Corporate backed her up, and refused to verify on the camera that there were no customers in the store, and you know how they like to watch the cameras to determine what was said in a conversation. I was also called into the office for reasons I still don't understand and didn't understand at the time. Someone else was stealing something or suing something else and I was quid pro quo, told that employees should not do anything that looks like retaliation, or that employees who steal would never be able to get a job anywhere else. I certainly did none of these things, I just wanted to come in, do my job, be professional and mind my own business, but was harassed by supervisors and called names behind my back and to my face by some bitter washed up technicians, and then told that I was disrespectful to them , or rude to them, or not fair to my employees. I have repeatedly asked them to tell me ONE SINGLE EXAMPLE of what I did or what I said, and NEVER could they come up with one. I can tell you that every employee I have worked with has violated loss prevention guidelines and I believe I was finally terminated so they could cover up themselves. The facts don't lie, my numbers were better than most pharmacists, My audits were always in fact immaculate, my prescriptions were on time more than most, I did 800 flu shots last season. And did more with less hours than any other pharmacist. If my customers weren't already satisfied I did whatever I could to make it right. Their feedback was almost always good. I was always respectful of my employees and their needs. I was told by technicians who weren't lazy and bitter that one of my best qualities was my willingness to step up and help where help is needed, but some people can't allow other people to be successful, without bullying them.  less
Pros
a pretty brick building
Cons
inhumanity
Was this review helpful?Yes53No4
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Truly unpleasant place to work
IT person (Former Employee) –  Western USMay 23, 2013
I worked for the PBM business of CVS Caremark for just under one year, despite what I felt was a darn good pay and benefits package. I was mentally and physically exhausted from losing 50%+ of my nights and weekends and enduring a completely hostile IT management environment. My team was 33% to 50% of the size needed to meet the workload, audit, and regulatory requirements and expectations placed upon us. I like to stay busy, but I did not enjoy being set up to fail. I also felt that the organization moved too hastily, to the point of sloppiness, in providing IT solutions to our internal customers. I am certain it is only a matter of time before a major data loss or other compromising event occurs and makes the news.

My director was a complete and unpredictably volatile a-hole. More than once I witnessed him provide undeserved, public tongue lashings to subordinates who dared to make suggestions with which he didn't agree or, God forbid, criticize anything. For some unknown reason, he took a severe dislike to one particular fellow team member. I watched him marginalize and belittle this good person to the point where he resigned- I believe this was my director's goal. This worker was reliable and competent, and his departure was a loss to the team. This is not how a so-called "director" should behave.

I also witnessed him burn through many, many excellent managers and team leads under him, apparently without the scrutiny of his VPs- how does this happen again and again? My feeling is that this company just makes too much money too rapidly for anyone in upper management to
  more... care about what goes on below. Perhaps a couple bad quarters will inspire some introspection and analysis.

I think I realized that I didn't want to work (and live) like this any longer when I started going out of my way to avoid any and all contact with this director. I would try to learn where he'd be (meetings, on the road, etc...) so that I could be someplace else. I'd poke my head over the cubicles so that I might scout out his balding head so that I could walk the other way. Others on my team behaved this way, as well. My sole definition of a good day was when I didn't have to interact with him in any way, shape, or form. On days when he was out of office, the calm and relief in the office was palpable. Would not my time and efforts have been better spent on IT matters?

On to another topic... I would consider CVS Caremark, objectively, to be an "immature" IT organization- this is not a criticism, just an observation that might be helpful to those considering employment here. I cannot recommend CVS Caremark to a young IT guy- I think this place would crush his soul. This place is for the already-jaded mid- or late-career IT professional- one who is battle-worn and able to accept IT mediocrity. Look elsewhere for employment unless you have a high tolerance for frustration, inefficiency, and nonsense rules and policies that shift like dandelions in the wind (and are never documented/communicated well). This is the place for someone looking for a paycheck, not someone who wants work/life balance, to enjoy their work, to make a real difference, to learn something useful, etc... Processes, tools, and policies here are generally not existent, not effective, not useful, and/or not adhered to. Change management is particularly cumbersome and the "rules" change often, to the point where no one really ever knows what the policies du jour are this week.

I left a good job at a good company to work for Caremark (I was tired of traveling). I've now landed in a fantastic place. I do not regret the move, but I wish that I'd worked for a competent director so that I could have stayed. I feel that all of the other challenges of working there could have been tolerable and that there might have been a light at the end of the tunnel if I'd had a different director. Directors should provide direction, no? Though I held my tongue in the exit interview ("I'm leaving for a fantastic opportunity elsewhere..."), the fact is that I left because of him. I grieve for the poor souls who remain- many fine people still work there.

I believe that CVS Caremark, considered in its entirety, is a good company. People who work outside of IT seem happy and satisfied. I do not hold a grudge against the company- I still shop at CVS regularly.
  less
Pros
pay, benefits.
Cons
management, workload, work/life balance, unpleasant work environment, everything else.
Was this review helpful?Yes40No3
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Would Prefer Never to Work for CVS Again
Pharmacy Technician (Former Employee) –  FloridaApril 4, 2014
I worked at CVS as a pharmacy technician and my time there was less than enjoyable.
Although I had completed a Pharmacy Technician Training Course, as well as passed my PTCE, I was still considered a trainee and had to undergo CVS's training program also.
I learned little or nothing from their training program, because during our orientation classes we were mostly taught how to treat the customers so that "we" (the CEO's) can make our profits, then I was expected to work one day every two weeks and be able to know everything needed to know to work in the pharmacy, .
The Front Store management was great, but I never knew what to make of our PIC. I was lied to from interview number one, when I was told I would make more than $8 an hour because of my national certification, and that I would start off at 15-16 hours per week. For two months I worked 6 hours every two weeks, at $8 an hour until I quit.
I had also made it known that I would be keeping my other job, so that I could afford 80 miles round trip to work for them for $8 an hour, and my current boss would be working around my new schedule. He had no problem contacting me every day when modules for the training courses weren't complete, when I had ample time to finish them, but on several occasions, I could not get the hours I needed to keep my bills paid from my other job, because he would take all day to approve our schedule, thereby causing my boss to leave me off the schedule because I was unable to give him any notice before the schedule was posted.
I'm also very thankful for the three co-workers who would actually speak
  more... to me when I came in the door, since the rest would not say a word. I really didn't expect a small town pharmacy to be so clannish.
I typically have no issue with doing my job without guidance or being told what to do, but the hardest part of my job was by far, the lack of communication! I could type a patients name into the computer a hundred times attempting with no avail to find their prescription and very seldom would the technician who actually handled the specific prescription speak up and tell me what the problem was (out of stock, ins. rejection, etc.) I thought they were supposed to call the patient if there was a problem, but here they would be at my drive-thru window five minutes after I clocked in, asking about a prescription they dropped off 4 hours ago, and if I asked about it either no one knew or I got a sarcastic response. (Minnie Mouse is not showing up on the register, is her hydrocodone out of stock? I don't know go look on the shelf and see!)
I absolutely loved the customers. I don't think I ever heard a rude word come out of their mouths.
The last straw finally came in early February when I was sick with bronchitis. Every once in a while during my shift a bad coughing spell would come on and I would step out to the bathroom to avoid coughing all over the patients medications. I thought it would be appreciated since I didn't cough all over a cancer patients meds, for example, and cause them to die of pneumonia, but instead I was pulled to the side, scolded for "taking too many breaks", not giving anyone notice when I was stepping out (I can't if I can't breathe!), and last but not least if lost prevention were called in and something was missing they would be looking at me because I have been in and out of the pharmacy so much. When I explained the situation I was told to get it under control. The next morning I woke up not feeling any better, so I decided I would do just that. I called early that morning to let them know I would not be in, that I was going to get the cough treated so I would be better by Monday when I would return.
That's when I was informed that I could not call in sick unless I have called someone to cover my shift (a.k.a. lead tech didin't want to pull a double) even though I had no staff directory. Although the pharmacy was over crowded every time I worked, she only gave me ONE person to call to pick up my shift. Surprise!! He didn't answer the phone. So I simply left him a message, hung up and went on to the doctor, minus my second job.

I hope to never work or do business with CVS / Pharmacy ever again.
  less
Was this review helpful?Yes40No6
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Former manager
Store Manager (Former Employee) –  Minneapolis, MNJuly 22, 2013
CVS is a very stressful place to work for any member of management and pharmacy staff. Little hours to work with yet high expectations to complete plan o grams, SOS monthly meetings, district meetings, receiving and putting out truck and to complete other daily tasks such as price changes, outdates,cycle counts, price audits, checking in DSD, setting ad tags, checking endcap performance and replacing midweek if not up to expectations. Do not forget about setting monthly endcaps to the sales guide. There is also the seasonal sets of a 24 hour turn around expectation...with only one manager and a cashier. CVS tries to invoke customer service as its number one priority but yet does not give the hours to properly run a store with what they wish to accomplish which is to improve customer service. Hard to do with one manager and one cashier working. Managers are paid on a 45 hour a week expectation but most managers work a minimum of 50 with two nights and every other weekend, if someone does not call off sick.

This is a physically demanding job with much bending, reaching above your head, walking and standing. As a manager you will unload trucks, clean up human feces or vomit, vacuum and dust along with other manager duties. You will have to be able to multi task and have a great sense of time management to work under 55 hours per week. It will ad years to your life.
ADA compliance, price changes, sales endcap performance, promo ordering and completion, on boarding of new associates, training (very heavy regulated company so expect lots of expected compliance training which adds
  more... to the manager having to work more hours because the associates are expected to read and take training modules).

There are several metrics you will have meet including customer service (which actually breaks down into five subcategories), sales, margin, hours, inventory control including instocks on regular as well as promo merchandise, observations of associates to ensure they GOT Heart. I am missing several others metrics you are required to meet.

As a manager you should play into the corporate politics and agree with everything the DM or above dictates or your job will not be easy. Do not challenge the CVS way. If the DM asks you to do something above and beyond (like go to another store to help clean it up on our day off even if it means cancelling a doctor appointment or vacation day) you best do it. DMs play favorites and it is very apparent.

On the plus side, job security is pretty good if you are a descent manager because they cannot find anyone to replace the managers. They do give out raises if you meet all your metrics although the raises are minimal at best. Actually, they do find people but they are not usually trained well. Training is on your own for the most part and is very poor at best. Better hope your shift supervisor or employee does not quit because there are not extra training hours to hire and train someone properly unless you work extra hours to stay within your hours budget.

I question those who rate CVS above three stars. I would guess CVS corporate hires someone to write these reviews to make CVS look like a great place to work. It is retail and you will have to work very hard with sacrificing your quality of life outside of work.

I was a successful store manager with CVS for several years. I was recognized as a top performer a couple of years. I am not writing this out of spite because I did have some great times at CVS. I am simply writing to state the high expectations required on minimal hours and most likely higher salaries. You will sacrifice your work/life balance if do you have a solid team to support you and play into the corporate politics.
  less
Pros
interaction with customers, learn how to run a business and be able to make some decisions if you have the support of your dm.
Cons
work/life balance, pay and pay increases, little training hours, required 24 hour turn around of seasonal sets. unloading and stocking of truck within 24 hours.
Was this review helpful?Yes17No2
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Nice company, but call center work was not for me
Prior Authorization Representative (Former Employee) –  Richardson, TXNovember 12, 2012
I worked as a PA rep, and I landed the job with zero prior pharmacy tech experience. So, this is a job that certified Pharmacy techs can get with little to no experience. Plus, it pays better than retail or even hospital positions do. The catch is Caremark will not actually hire you until you've at least shown yourself to be competent through an extended temp agency contract.

Firstly, Caremark has an extensive training program that will get just about anyone up to speed before throwing new employees into the fray.

The work environment is a large office/call center. PA reps take incoming calls from physicians, while Customer care reps take calls from members/patients. The customer care side requires fewer technical skills, but it's probably the tougher assignment. I think it's easier to get a job working in too.
Caremark is very strict on their employees clock time. It's all managed via the phone system, so there is not much wiggle room there. They also stress that all calls are potentially monitored for obvious reasons.

During my time there (5 months) I learned a lot of information regarding specific Rx drugs, as PA reps generally deal with about 20 different drugs daily. Total though, I imagine that number is around 100 or so. I was able to and encouraged to use the internet and read about the drugs I worked with during down time.

Even though I performed well, I found PBM call center work to be very unattractive. If you value interacting with coworkers, you will be disappointed like I was. Every employee is essentially in a cell with a phone, email, and fax for communicating.
  more... Caremark discourages standing up and directly interacting with neighboring coworkers. Instead, you have a senior team and a pharmacist line at your disposal. This is the efficient way to do things of course and is merely the nature of the work.

For me the biggest non-call center negative about PA work at Caremark is when a medical case does not match with what the insurance's Rx PA questions were designed to account for. The worst example I can recall was a step therapy PA that was just plain incorrectly put together. The member ended up getting denied due to a nonsensical question I was required to ask. I told the physician's office I would check on it and get back to them. Everyone I emailed/spoke to (including the pharmacist) about it agreed that it was a flawed question, but in the end I was ordered by some admin pharmacy technician that we simply can't do anything about it. She only admitted this after I continued to point out the absurdity of the question. So, I was forced to call them back and attempt to explain without making Caremark sound bad. Being forced to sound stupid to the physician's office like this because of the questions I had to ask was nearly a daily occurrence. It was part of the job, and I imagine the customer care side was quite a bit worse in this sense.

My exit from the Caremark PA dept went smoothly. My supervisor was a very nice person to work for and is now a reference I use. My impression is if you are generally on time, and show yourself to not be incompetent by making too many errors, you will be picked up as a permanent hire. That's of course only if you can get past the call center stuff.
  less
Pros
nice facility, relatively good pay, nice hours, decent benefits for perm hires
Cons
call center work, frustrating job at times
Was this review helpful?Yes10No3
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Dead end, straight forward j.o.b (Just Over Broke)!!
Pharmacy Technician (Former Employee) –  Hamilton, OHSeptember 7, 2014
Typical day starts off with customers waiting in drive-thru before the store opens. This particular location does about 80 scripts a day (if lucky) but some days much more scripts are done this is a bad thing because the least number of scripts produced means less number of hours to give for the work schedule so the pharmacy ends up short with help. Even if the pharmacy is not busy its difficult for a one tech to work because many pharmacist work under the ethic that pharmacists are expeted to fill scripts and consult customers nothing more, no helping ring out customers no taking out trash no refilling labels, no filling scripts no nothing to help make job most efficient for technicians.

Management could use some training in management. Most of the staff in the supervising positions (even P.I.C) try to control and micro-manage workers and do little to evalutate working conditions and recieve input from workers to acknowledge the needs of workers and what would make work environment go more smoothly. Just a bunch of authority driven people who enjoy making people feel as little as theypossibly could. When workers do well and recieve exceptionla feedback from customers and monthly reviews issued by corporate, little acknowledge is given but if there is one bad review a big deal is made and all exercises are created for workers to complete on the learnet web site in modules.

I have worked at several CVS locations and of them all each of the coworkers were beyond miserable had some case of rage or stress issues or were just operating on auto-pilot. One of the workers worked for
  more... cvs as a technician for 8 years and had minimal knowledge to complete work tasks which was a reflection of poor management. It is unimaginable that someone could be in a work setting for nearly a decade and could barely execute the main work tasks.

The hardest part of the job is communicating with the insurance companies and the customers. Insurance agent might as well be added to the criteria for the position of a technician because dependng on demographics *80% of the customers dont know what type ofprescription coverage they have or even if they are covered. and also dealing with the incoming calls to the pharmacy, most of the calls are patients calling to see if scripts are ready, if they have been called in, or basic questions that could turn into a 5 or 10 minute phone call which in turn you have to learn to multi task counting pills or typing scripts while managing a callers concerns. A call center or a set up where calling the pharmacy for basic inquiries would be an advancement for work productivity. a lot of work doesnt get done in the pharmacy because we're busy answering the phone all day.

If you have good co workers the job could be enjoyable but you have to work as a team and it wont work anyother way. the problem is with the way the work place is set up with rules and policies it allows for unjust treatment to others.
  less
Pros
20% discount on store products
Cons
short or no lunch breaks, cant have phone in pharmacy, no food or drink in pharmacy (doesnt apply to pharmacists), long hours standing
Was this review helpful?Yes21No5
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
I worked for CVS for 2 years. Boy, let me tell you!
Forklift Operator, and occasional picker (Former Employee) –  Waverly, NYDecember 22, 2014
I have never been so relieved to loose a job at the warehouse, and I am the type to tough it out thinking everything will be fine as long as I do what I am suppose to do. Not at this job. There is very little job security. You have to be in certain departments to be capable of making it. Select few in the other departments have to have a "fighter" personality to them. This is at the Chemung/Waverly, NY warehouse mind you.
Example: As a picker, they give you an RF unit to scan onto a ticket. You have to slap that onto a tote, and the shelves behind you have lights that light up under the product that the store orders and how many. The problem is that it rates you on how fast you go and you have to be fit enough to do "aerobics" for, on the norm, 10-12 hours a day, 5 days a week (seasonally 8 hrs a day, but that is not common). They give you sections to work in. Some of them are rated realistically, but MOST sections are not exactly. There are sections where it is a trap. I'm talking ... nobody can make it in the section. The "fighters" that have been there for a long time know where those spots are. As a short person, this job, which is the main position in the building, would not be capable of making the same rate as a taller person in the same section.. but that's why they make the bottom two shelves flat right? So the shorter people can climb all day to get what they need. That is just one example of one job position, and a small portion of it at that. It's definitely not that people don't want to work, it's that they rate you unrealistically to their expectations, but that
  more... could be another story in itself. They don't cycle through such an enormous amount of people for no reason. I've seen GOOD people loose there job there sooo many times because they couldn't meet unrealistic expectations that they got stuck in. The rules at CVS in the office is ...... they do what they want. I received top incentive in my job position and I was also the only one in my little department to do it on the regular, but the lower pay sugared with incentive pay is still not enough to have high stress and anxiety over. Plus, they don't care or notice when you go out of your way and go over and beyond what is expected of you. You are just as disposable as the lazy person next to you, you just might last a little longer. Yes, management might notice you and love you, but it is the office people above them that fire people so freely who don't care. I've seen quite a few people have literal break downs many times during my time there. It is not that uncommon... that should tell you enough what it is like to work for this company. All of that is fixable, but as long as everything is "fine" and getting done in their eyes, that is all that matters to them. I hope that things improve drastically in the near future, but in the mean time, I am going to get a different job that pays what it is worth.  less
Pros
i loved the job that i was doing, vacation ph and paid sick days are great
Cons
micro-managed, fake caring from the upper ups, lazy hr workers
Was this review helpful?Yes27No4

Want to know more about CVS Health?

Ask a question
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
An ok work place, great team but most customers were rude.
Front Store (Former Employee) –  Grosse Pointe, MIApril 25, 2013
A typical work day there would be coming into the store for the mid-day rush of customers. All in a rush, so their attitudes weren't the best when trying to give them great service. The comments to be heard from the customers were amazing and a shock especially to see it coming from the older people in line. Of course while cleaning the store there are times when you will find that items are missing. People have stolen things such as wine, beauty products, condoms, even pregnancy tests. This is a daily occurrence, yet nothing can be done about it cause around the afternoon time there aren't many people working to cover the whole floor. At most we have 2 cashiers, the photo technician, a manager and a person doing stock. That store is pretty big, and that's not enough personnel to catch thievery.

Kids run a muck in the store, but that's not really the stores fault as much as they have no where else to go. That place is the local teen hang out. Management is somewhat supportive in most cases if an emergency comes up. Depending on the manager on hand.

What i learned from this job is that, it takes a considerable amount of patience to work retail. The daily stress it causes on the human psyche, is enormous and you must have the will to not let it get to you. Depending on the area you work in, the lack of respect you will receive from some of the customers comes plentiful. Each person has their way of dealing with the stress, most from what i've seen have their cigarette break, others have a drink after work. Some find other co-workers to talk to.

I've spoken with a few co-workers
  more... during my working there. Some new, some old but statements were the same, " Why when i walk through the door, i already feel tired?"

Hardest Part of this job, is dealing with the stress. It's easy to just do your job, and brush the comments aside, but when it comes down to it you will need a way to relieve stress. Most enjoyable part, is the people you work with. You will meet some great people working there. Before i forget a note on management. While working there i've voiced to a few managers that i would like to learn working at the photo place. Some said they would voice it at the next management meeting. I have no idea if they did but when it came down to them needing more photo help, i was clearly left out of it. As i was not one of the people to get trained. One of the Photo Technicians working there knew i wanted to and was eager to work photo, and asked if i told them cause she was surprised i wasn't getting trained for it when they needed the help.

I feel everyone should work retail at least once in their life, and see if they don't come out of it with if anything more respect for the person behind the register or the person helping you find things in the store. It was definitely a learning experience in how to treat those around you.
  less
Pros
good work team, free lunch when events are happening.
Cons
customer respect for the clerk, lack of management consideration.
Was this review helpful?Yes5No1
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
It has its ups and downs.
Pharmacy Technician / Cashier (Current Employee) –  Germantown, MDMarch 4, 2014
I was initially a cashier, but because of severe cuts to my hours, I went to the pharmacy and became a technician trainee. The quality of the job as a whole definitely depends on which store you work at. I've heard many stories; some stores are definitely busier than others. The same goes for the quality of the management.

Management at my store is alright. I like some of the managers more than others. I find the company as a whole to be decent. I'd like it better if they didn't do so many hour cuts.

You have to have good customer service skills to do this job. CVS has a different sale on every week and I've had many instances when customers get angry that they missed a sale or the signs still had last week's sale on them. To negotiate with them and help them leave with optimal satisfaction, you need confidence and good people skills. Naturally quiet, pushover-type people will have a hard time doing this, especially in the pharmacy.

As a cashier, I was responsible for conducting transactions, bagging what the customers buy (if they want a bag...where I live, we charge 5 cents per bag), filling photo orders, taking passport pictures, stocking shelves, organizing sales signs, answering the phone, straightening the aisles, taking out the trash, vacuuming before close, doing MoneyGrams and money orders, and answering questions about where certain products are located.

As a pharmacy technician trainee, I help customers to drop off and pick up their prescriptions, print out prescription labels, find the medications that match them, fill them (usually by counting), and get them
  more... ready to be verified by the pharmacist. I also file the completed prescriptions in the waiting bin, answer the phone, put back medications, and run the cash register.

The biggest advantage is you get to meet a lot of people. Some customers become your regulars and you look forward to seeing them when they come in. People will surprise you because many of them are friendly. You also have room for advancement.

Disadvantages include difficult customers. As a cashier, you get people who will get angry if they don't get a certain price or if their coupons aren't accepted. As a tech, you get people who are impatient or who are just sick and are normally nice people but because they're sick, they sometimes take it out on you. You're also on your feet your whole day with the exception of a 30 minute break if you work a long shift. Comfortable shoes are a must. The pay also isn't that great. For both jobs, I got paid the same $10 an hour, and as a tech I definitely did a lot more.

All in all, I don't hate it. I have nothing to compare it to because it's my first workplace. But I'm thankful I have it.
  less
Pros
opportunity to meet a lot of people, fast-paced
Cons
short breaks, on your feet all day, average pay, understaffed a lot
Was this review helpful?Yes25No4
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Long hours during the winter, under 40 hours during the summer, ridiculous expectations, poor management, poor pay and health benefits.
Order Picker (Current Employee) –  Knoxville, TNMay 9, 2015
I started working at a CVS distribution warehouse as an order picker during the winter. They tell you when they hire you that you'll be working 8 hour shifts mon-fri with the occasional overtime. NOT TRUE. For almost 5 months we worked anywhere from 9-13 hour shifts. Not knowing when we would get out of there each day. You don't have a specific ending time. You work until the work is done and sometimes you have no idea when that will be. You get two 15 min breaks and a 30 min lunch a day. If we did not work past 5:30, they would make us work from 1:45-5:30 without a break. You're expected to keep up a "speed rate" that is ridiculous. If not, you are reprimanded with a "write up" or your job is threatened. There are so many different things that happen everyday on the line that affect your time and there is nothing you can do. You walk away to go to the bathroom? It affects your time. You don't have product and have to go ask the stocker or call up front? It affects your time. The totes they use to ship the medicine are absolutely disgusting because the cvs stores keep them outside after they have opened and emptied them. Often times they are soaked with rainwater. Cvs expects you to put cardboard in the bottom of each wet tote to keep the medicine dry. Your hands get absolutely disgusting. They never have a cleaning crew come in and clean the warehouse. The whole places is coated with brown and black dust. I come home almost everyday with black stuff in the corners of my nose from the fans blowing it around. Disgusting. CVS' motto is health this and health that for their customers  more... but they have no concern for the health of their employees. Their insurance is AWFUL and goes up every year. The pay is low and there is little to no room for advancement in this company. DO NOT WORK HERE. HR makes everything sound wonderful when they bring you in for orientation. Their offices and the orientation rooms and bathrooms are really nice and clean and updated. Once you get back to your department everything is trash. Dirty, outdated and unkept. There were days our paper towel holders (the old outdated ones that always get stuck because you have to continuously press down on the plastic handle) wouldn't even have towels in them. Sometimes we wouldn't have soap. I would be absolutely EMBARASSED to manage a place this disorderly and dirty. All CVS cares about is money and quotas. How quickly you can throw a bunch of medicine in a disgusting tote. They have no regard for their employes. Pathetic place to work. Don't waste your time.  less
Pros
Very little
Cons
Low pay, poor management, dirty and disorderly, long unexpected hours, ridiculous speed rate.
Was this review helpful?Yes15No1
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Not worth your time to work here if you are on the sales floor
Asst. Manager (Current Employee) –  Houston, TexasOctober 21, 2015
Where do I begin. It is sad when my trainer said on day one that C V S is one of top 10 companies with the worst customer service images. Saturday or Sunday depending on your store you are taking down tags & putting up 1500 to 2000 tags per week that were the same tags with the same sales info from last week for the most part. Corporate should let sales tags go for more than 1 week. This task is hard to do with coupon customers coming in all day filling their baskets with the sale items then you are having to run restock the shelves with product & no way to enforce a limit. Then product is out then customers get upset. Other customers that come to purchase a few items then they end up leaving empty handed & fustrated because there is only 2 associates ringing up customers & both of you are tied up with coupon customers that have multiple sales. NEED MORE HELP. Tasks that leave the registers unattended that gives customers an uneasy feeling when they walk in the store especially at night & when the pharmacy is closed. With that customers look for assistance in the store & more time is wasted since you have to walk up to the front to ring them up.
Management explained to me that corporate found out within the last 2 years that staffing was not keeping up with all the task that needed to be done. So therefore stores suffer & get behind. If you decide to become a manager learning how to do scheduling & other reports are done on your time because you have to complete you task & management does not have time nor the hours to pay for training. This includes new hire training which
  more... is done on your computer at your house because the computers at the store are always in use. (So you are working at home off the clock which is illegal) If you are a key carrier since there is only 2 of you you can't leave for lunch. & be prepared to come back from lunch early & have to give back time because you gave help to customers during your lunch!!!! This company talks a good game on accountability but does nothing to ensure that task are completed. That when you get promoted to management the store you go to is a wreck!!! So if you are looking forward to be set up for failure, projects left uncompleted, feeling hopeless and no support from upper management then this is the company for you. It seems to me that this company needs to pay attention to its associates & hire staff in the front end. No telling how many quality people that cared that were fustrated & felt they couldn't take anymore because upper management didn't care to listen. This company lost me & I would not recommend working for this company.  less
Pros
Discounts on C V S brand merchandise when it is not on sale
Cons
Coming to work for this company
Was this review helpful?Yes15No1
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
It was tough to keep a smile on for customers due to the coworkers.
Photo Technician/ Cashier (Former Employee) –  Greenfield, MASeptember 10, 2013
A typical day at work would include punching in, and looking at who was working during my shift. After this if I was on for the photo lab I would start up the machines and the photo lab while at the same time I would cash out customers for an hour until the next person came for their shift. During my shift depending on what the shift supervisor would ask of me I would help cash out customers, develop photos, help customers on the photo machines, answer questions, and help put away items on the shelves. If any of the photo lab machines were down (which would happen often) I would have to call Qualex and deal with the issue while at the same time make sure customers were being taken care of. At the end of my shift I would have to wait until the next person for photo to relieve me, and I would fill them in on what happened during the shift and if they had any photo orders that should be done within the next hour. After this I would punch out. If I was put on for cashier I would punch in and ask the supervisors what they needed me to do. Sometimes I would be cashing people for my whole eight hour shift, and other times I would be stocking shelves, and at times they would have me cover the photo lab because someone called out or the supervisor that was put on for photo didn't want to do photo that day.
During my time at this job I learned a lot about patience and how crucial it is to have in the work place. I developed a lot of people skills and I learned a lot about dealing with difficult situations. Dealing with the issue in the most professional manner was always important to
  more... me and I always tried to give the customer the best possible experience.
The management changed a few times during the time I worked at CVS and the workplace was different every time. The last manager I had was not terrible but a lot of the time I felt as if he was not very helpful. When I left the job because I was moving he was willing to help me transfer.
My co-workers varied, but they all were great, hard, workers. We all worked together to get things done in a timely manner.
The toughest part of my job was dealing with co-workers that did not want to be there and did not want to help.
The most enjoyable part of my job was putting a smile on a customer's face. On a few occasions helped a lady who was bound to her wheelchair and she would always ask for me. I also helped a Spanish speaking family find things and answer questions they had, they also always asked for me.
  less
Pros
developing people skills, learning to deal with tough situations
Cons
dealing with co-workers who did not want to help
Was this review helpful?Yes2No1
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Great company if they cared a little more about their employees.
Customer Care Representative (Former Employee) –  San Antonio TexasOctober 20, 2014
I was with CVS for about a month. I was on my last week of class training. I got sick over the weekend and missed Monday and Tuesday of class. apperently if we missed any days of school we would get write ups for each day missed. Well I got 2 write ups and I was told that if I had missed another day, I would have gotten terminated. I went to class on Wednesday only because we had our last final for training. I was still sick but I still showed up. I had a doctors note and you could even tell I was really sick. But with the doctors note the absences werent excused. So I was pretty much hanging by a straw at CVS. I had already knew that I wasnt going to go in Thursday because I knew over night I wasnt going to get better. Its a great company to work for and everything. Great benefits. But the only thing is, its not flexible with your life schedule. They put the buisness needs before your life needs. I didnt know I was going to get sick and I couldnt help it. I would have just liked if CVS cared a little bit more about their employees and not the buisness....Hence we are the ones that are helping and taking the calls and answering the customers questions. Another thing I didnt like that much about CVS was security. They were rude. If you lost a badge or needed a temp one, they wouldnt give you one. They would either make you go home and go get it, so you would be late for work or they would make you tell your suporvisor to have them buzz you in and out for the day, which was a hassle. They were also rude and not helpful when you had questions or concerns.
Management was ok. Supervisors
  more... are very helpful and answer any questions you have, but when it comes to being sick, they dont really care.
Co-workers are very nice, I had no trouble making new friends and getting along with people there. Some were even very helpful.
Hardest part was probably all the escalated calls. Majority of our callers are senior citizens and it just broke my heart when they would call in and they would be upset with the company or they couldnt get their medicine and there wasnt anything we could do for them right off the bat. I just felt so bad for them because they are older and not very rememberable.
Most enjoyable part of the job, our recognition at work. When we would get customer call backs to say that we helped them and that we were great with them, we would get a "Because I Cared" ribbon from our supirvisor. We would have luncheons with our supivisors and we would get gifts from CVS. Also another enjoyable thing about working for CVS was all the friendly faces.
  less
Was this review helpful?Yes18No3
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Be in it for the people
Full-time Shift Supervisor (Current Employee) –  Evansville, INJuly 1, 2014
If you can love the people you work with every day and learn to love your community, this could be for you. The work is not physically hard.
A typical day of work is clocking in, at either 6 am or 2 pm depending on your shift, which they alternate. My store isn't 24 hours.
If it's open shift you do money work, straighten the store quickly, and open the doors at 7. The first several people will have probably been up all night or walked from the hospital, or are waiting several hours for the first place that sells liquor within walking distance.

The cashier shows up just before 7 to watch the front while you look through an online workload manager and begin your merchandising maintenance jobs for the day.

When hours were good, in the before-times, a second cashier came in 11-7 to cover meal breaks and generally relive the stress of running a store with 7000 different kinds of items with only 2 people.
Now they force us to take meal breaks leaving the whole store on the shoulders of a manager and a cashier one at a time.

If you close it's much simpler than opening but the hassle comes in counting the money, finishing anything begun by the morning shift, and also accomplishing any goals you had set out for yourself, all while struggling with vendors, rushes times, cashier breaks, pharmacy help, the photo area, keeping the parking lot clean and then counting the drawers at the end of the night.

There are no free lunches, there are no random raises or promotions. If you make less than X you get a 5% raise every year. If it's X it's 4% or 3% so you are basically tied to inflation.
  more...

You are only allowed to sign up for healthcare immediately upon starting or you have to wait for April because our company only accepts applications once a year.

Do not expect upper management to ever do anything but smile, nod, and move on because they are spread just as thin as all of the employees. They are NOT paid to fight for you or look out for you. They care about numbers. Did your store make its numbers?

Everything I learned in the end is that our CEO is ranked #104 on the Forbes list and made 12.1 Mil plus stocks etc in 2013 after only a year and I didn't break 13k then after 5 years of sweat and service.

The hardest part of the job is going to work to force a smile on my face as I watch the people I work with suffer under crushing poverty and being unable to help them or help myself.

The most enjoyable part is the strong bonds that you form through selling the same person the same drink every day for a month, or simply being with and having things in common with people.
  less
Was this review helpful?Yes10No1
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
CVS Review
Shift Supervisor (Former Employee) –  North Royalton, OHSeptember 24, 2012
A typical day, when I opened the store, involved my counting of the cash register drawers, from the previous day, and preparing them for the current day. I then would count the deposit, insuring its accuracy and preparing it for deposit into the bank. Cycle Counts, which verified negative on hand counts, followed by price change labels, which replaced current labels with new labels. I would receive any deliveries, follow any additional instructions, from my store manager, check store emails, for any urgent business, and check the Workload Manager, for any tasks that were due or overdue. In addition to the regular tasks, It was assumed that both the shift supervisor (myself) and cashier would maintain cleanliness of the store (as time permitted) and provide excellent customer service to all customers entering and leaving the store.

I gained managerial experience, whether opening or closing the store, and learned to value my cashiers and their ability to provide customer service to any and all customers.

Management, at CVS, ended with the regular daily tasks. I say this in remembering that most directives, given to the cashiers, by me, were overridden by my store manager, or senior shift supervisors. This allowed the impression, for cashiers, that my authority was non-existent, thus, management at CVS was less than enjoyable.

I worked with two types of co-workers: non-union (in Michigan) and union (in Ohio). I preferred the non-union co-workers, as they worked harder, did more and were still able to provide excellent customer service and maintain a level of camaraderie that
  more... added to my enjoyment of the job. My opinion of the union workers, at CVS, is that they were lazy and ungrateful. By this, I mean they did not work hard, did less work than non-union workers, provided decent to excellent customer service and were impersonal, leading to a lower level of camaraderie.

The hardest part of the job was developing a working relationship with co-workers in the non-union stores, which would have allowed for a more cohesive team unit.

In the non-union stores, developing a working relationship, with my peers and superiors, led to a more enjoyable work atmosphere, as well as a team unit that provided excellence and completed tasks expeditiously. The most enjoyable part of the job was working, in Michigan, at a non-union store.
  less
Pros
returning, satisfied customers; regular breaks; free flu shots; vacation and pto; holiday pay.
Cons
under-staffed stores; lack of team atmosphere; dissatisfied customers; incomplete tasks
Was this review helpful?Yes2No
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Good benefits. Good pay. Bad CEO. Bad resources. No incentives.
Assistant Store Manager (Former Employee) –  New York Metro AreaJuly 8, 2015
Pros
- Good Pay
- Great benefits. Offer 401k 5% match
- Overall job tasks simple
- Great company to work for through school. (Very flexible)
- Fast training for new employees
- Work-Life balance ok until you become a Store Manager.

Cons
- CEO : ( His bonus has been increasing yearly since his takeover, yet in store hours have been slashed significantly every year)

- Hour Cuts : Since the removal of tobacco making a schedule to comfortably run the store has become a major challenge as hours have been cut upward of 80 per week. This means less employees which yields worse customer service scores and makes completing simple no-brainer tasks such as taking a mandatory 30 min break per employee nearly impossible every day. (with that said, I don't recall the last time I actually sat down for a 30 minute break since the cigarette's went out of the stores)
What I find funny is even though the hour cuts, stores are still forced to open 365 days a year. All major holidays.

- Ancient Technology : The computer system is extremely out dated and running on computers and software that would have seem acceptable in the 90's. Specific office tasks take up huge binder space and waste tons of paper a week. These tasks could all be simply done on programs such as excel to save time looking through 10lbs binders and drawers of files with what seems to be pointless information.

- No incentive / Opportunities : There is a bonus you can work towards but over the past few years they just keep making it more and more difficult to achieve anything great. Weekly budgets have been sky
  more... rocketing to barley reachable amounts. Outdated machines such as photo takes away at our budget for repairs almost weekly. Less hours means less employees which yields bad customer service scores. Each store gets rated on this and by the end of the year this also affects the bonus pool.
Once you become a Store Manager there really is no further advancement anytime soon. I've been for the company for a few years now and whoever I witness become a Store Manager has either left the company or is still a Store Manager. At most you may get a larger volume store but the "Stuck" feeling is definitely present.
With that being said, the Assistant Manager position is quite comfortable especially since it's hourly, compared to Store Manager's... who input vacation days they earned in order not to go over weekly hours or spend 60 hours in the store a week to not even see a decent quarterly bonus like most companies do.
  less
Was this review helpful?Yes17No1
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
It's Retail, bottom line.
Certified Pharmacy Technician (Former Employee) –  Hammond, INFebruary 3, 2016
The interviewing and hiring process was horrible from day one. The hiring process took three months and I interviewed with, no joke, Five Different People. They couldn't, or were unwilling to match the pay I asked for, basing the figure off of my qualifications and years of experience. Pay is substandard at best if you know your worth.

The training period is simply awful. They give you two days to get the gist of everything, then throw you in. If you're not a quick study and don't catch on immediately, don't work here. I watch what happens to those that cannot cope, they get shunned and gossiped about by peers and management. Further "training" is delivered by inefficient training modules via the company's intranet.

Your basic tasks will be register, filling pill bottles, screening calls for the pharmacist, and taking care of insurance debacles.

The company's computer systems are incredibly dated and are not up to specs when it comes to other retail and hospital systems. They are very hokey and redundant.

Your peers dictate where you will be working throughout the day, instead of management. I've always had a huge issue with this, because they can stick you at a register practically all day, and there really isn't anything you can do about it. They need to incorporate a generalized rotation, so that every employee can be at every station equally, rather than what the other techs think is best.

Scheduling is awful. There are never enough people present in the pharmacy during the busiest of times.

They don't seem to like to further train people that have prior
  more... experience in other facilities, but have no issue promoting those that are fresh off the press. It's actually quite deplorable to know that one cannot progress after having several years of experience, a degree, and multiple certifications, as well as training that cannot even be matched by their own.

On the Plus Side...they do honestly care about their patients, more so than any other facility I have worked for. They always are trying to come up with better ways of improving the customer's experience.

Management seems to care about their employees, communication is always abundant, and even if it's on bad terms, they will try and work with you to rectify the problems.

The team is generally fun to work with, when they aren't complaining about other techs. There is joy in their work and they help make the day go by faster.
  less
Was this review helpful?YesNo

Overall rating

3.6
Based on 9,341 reviews
5 stars
4 stars
3 stars
2 stars
1 star

Ratings by category

Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Culture