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Futaba Indiana of America
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4 reviews

Futaba Indiana of America Employer Reviews

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A good job.
Logistics - Towmotor Operator (Former Employee), Vincennes, INJuly 30, 2013
Pros: decent pay, no shortage of hours
Cons: don't have time for a personal life
If you don't mind working 12 hours a day 6 days a week its a great job.
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fast paced
logistic (Former Employee), Vincennes, INJuly 26, 2012
Pros: good pay and beneifits
get to work, did our stretches, then on to loading carts and cells, very fast paced, loved it, i learned how to drive a forklift, a tugger. people were great, hard work, you earn your money and thats what i like,
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One of the better jobs in town and long twelve hour days. Always
Quality Assurance (Current Employee), Vincennes, IndianaDecember 17, 2011
Pros: mandatory 12 hour days
Cons: mandatory 12 hour days
Overall our department seems to have a constant struggle with the maintenance department over product quality concerns such as machine upkeep that produce the parts and a struggle with the production department over operator knowledge and training levels, outflow of bad parts, and a general lack of commitment to product quality.

These problems can – more... be caused by several reasons, but the first is accountability. Just as kids throwing a fit in the store, it happens because parents allow it to happen. When senior managers allow their subordinates to vie for attention, power, and resources, it usually ends with the haves and the have-nots. This lowers the level of commitment and effort among those looking on because it’s not right or efficient, but it is mentally draining to compete in a game you can never hope to win. Trying to compete with the teacher’s pet, as it were, is a lose-lose proposition.

Secondly, constant strife and bickering is just an outward representation of the lack of boundaries outwardly, and a lack of respect for coworkers inwardly. Oftentimes when departments are unable to work together effectively, it is usually just a symptom of a power struggle at the department head level. This represents itself in low trust levels among the members of each department where each has heard the behind-the-scenes bashing of the other department and is unable work together effectively on the floor. In other words, hidden conflict at the department head level is manifesting itself among intro-departmental trust exchanges at lower levels. This lack of cooperation drains resources, cuts innovation (by taxing mental energy that could be used to foster innovation instead of how to get someone to do their job), and is the antithesis to unity.

Third, due to the fact that this behavior is accepted and allowed to go one, by not making anyone accountable, and intro-departmental cooperation is discouraged, these factors combine to create a sort of paralysis to change the status quo. Work becomes a delicate balancing act in which one cares about ones job, but not caring enough to cause conflicts.

Lastly, there is no incentive to change. Lack of accountability, intro-departmental bickering, and keeping the status quo remain permanent fixtures in failing companies because they are allowed to. Until some event that forces change or upsets participants enough to change on their own, this lack of unity, innovation, and cohesiveness will continue. Incentivizing accountability would eliminate the chaotic atmosphere that is prevalent in dysfunctional organizations. Changing departmental formats or reorganizing how departments are made up (i.e. into teams or cells) would eliminate the fiefdom mentality and force intro-departmental cooperation.

In conclusion, the attitudes that prevail in any organization start at the top, but requires consistent and constant cooperation among upper managers. Unless effort is put forth by management to pursue and rectify the behavior discussed above, the company culture will suffer manifesting itself in stifling innovation resulting in an exodus of human capital which will affect the bottom line. – less