Potbelly Sandwich Works Employee Reviews

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Work Hard, and You'll Be Rewarded
Shift Leader (Former Employee) –  Coon Rapids, MNSeptember 7, 2013
I began this job as an associate and worked my way up to shift leader.
As an Associate: (I have worked at almost every store in MN, and each store is different, but this is the basic layout)
a typical day would coming in for 3-5 hours and mostly working with customers. If it was a day/lunch shift (11-3p) You would definitely be helping customers, either stationed at Load (where you initially take the order and send the sandwich through the oven), Dress (collecting the sent sandwich from the oven and putting topping on it and then giving to customer WHILE engaging them in conversation), Cash (ringing up customers while keeping up on making Shakes) or the Fronter (wiping off tables as they are made available, checking to make sure bathrooms are clean, washing a few dishes while helping the Casher with shakes if needed). The staff would consist of one person per station, plus a manager or two, so somewhere from 5-7 people.
dinner shifts (5-9.30, or whenever the store closes) are completely different though. There are only three people working - the Front Closer (who takes care of helping customers, while wiping out all the stations listed above as well as making sure everything behind the counter is stocked and cleaned), the Back Closer (who washes all of the days dishes, and is responsible for making sure the dining room, back of house and bathroom is stocked and cleaned) and the manager. The manager is technically only responsible for the tasks listed below (end of day paperwork and making sure everything is completed by the closers), so it can really vary on how much the closing
  more... manager will help the other two closers. I, personally, tried to help the Front closer as much as possible with customers. Customers are the worst part of closing, so, by helping to alleviate the stress of dealing with them, it make a huge difference.
aside from the tasks of the day, you don't get breaks, unless you work a 6hr or more shift. Most associates aren't given more than 25hrs per week, usually for high school/college students get less (if the manager doesn't like you, you could get just one shift a week, ouch.) Unless if you're full-time (32+hrs/week) you aren'y eligible for benefits. That's about it. Show up, do a good job, go home.

As a Shift Leader (SL):
a typical day as a SL would be either open shift (7-4/5p), which is opening the store with the prepper. You need to make the prep list by taking inventory of all the product on hand so the prepper can make the rest needed for the day. The rest of the morning before opening means simply opening the store, or undoing everything the closing staff did. Some days you'll have to put the truck away. The food truck will drop off all your food in your cooler and back of house. It's your job to put everything way. Hopefully you're fast, because it needs to be done before 8a! Most stores open at 11a, which is when your staff (Loader, Dressers, Casher, Fronter) would show up; as well as your closing manager by 11.30a. The lunch rush would come between 11.30-2p. You have very little afternoon paperwork. Those SLs who are on the computer all afternoon, are probably just playing solitaire or just on their phones. It'll be just you and the closing SL until 4 or 5p when the first closing associate will come in to relieve you.
as a closing shift (starting when the closing manager leaves), you'll have the whole run of the shop. But, you only have 2 other workers. you need to run through dinner shift. Rushes usually are done by 7.30p. You, however, can't actually start your paperwork until almost 8.30p. This paperwork is simply just the daily reports (like inventory, cash deposit, sales, labour percentages), but all of those numbers can't be collected until business has ended. Most stores close at 9p or even 10p, but you're expected to be out within 30-45mins. Which means, as the managers, you have a ton to do. You have to gather all the numbers from several different places, as well as counting both cash drawers and make sure the numbers all match. It something in there get messed up, then you may be there a lot longer than 9.45p.
It can definitely be a tough job sometimes, especially if you're a good SL. When I say "good," I mean, diligent and hard working; one who actually cares about his job and wants to see growth in the company/work place. That would be what I wanted. (In general, I want to be seen in favour of by my superiors and to do the best, honest job I can; even at pbells.) I've seen many others who have a similar work ethic than I, and it's just as hard for them some days.
On the flip-side though, you will meet manager that don't do half the work you do. As I said before, I've worked at many different locations and worked with many different people. More than a handful of those manager didn't do squat. I have worked with several associates who say they like me better because [insert name] just sits in the back all night. The sad part is that, generally, those SL would make more than me (usually $1+/hour).

Another part of this job that can be really rough is the accountability of the higher-ups. I'm simply sharing my experience and not trying to vent, but I was relocated to a different store that was 21 miles away (about 35min drive in good traffic). My issue was, obviously, gas. My car got about 26mpg, so generally I'd spend 1.62 gallons ($5.61) simply to drive to work for a shift. Aka, $112.10 per month, JUST to drive to work (that's more than my iPhone AT&T bill). Originally I was at a store I could walk to, 2 miles from my house. So the district manager (my boss' boss) promised me a $0.50 raise. I never got that raise. I emailed her 3 times, and called her about it....nothing. Now, since we're in math class apparently, if you take that and figure out how much money I wasn't given in compensation for my driving, it would work out to be $775.68. This is based on a 35hr work week, but I was usually on the overtime list. I started at this new location in early august 2012 and ended end august 2013. A WHOLE YEAR, and I still didn't get the raise.
I'm not looking for pity or any resolution from this, but I have witnessed so many similar incidences, where promises were made, and there was no follow-up or follow-through. The ironic part is that the company constantly talks about how we need to work on it and that we're know for how good we are at it...except potbelly SUCKS at it. And, to bring this essay-long review to a close, I think that's what I didn't like so much from this job, was the company. I mean, who actually likes the cooperation side of the job they work for, but the micro-management REALLY got to me. People will say "we want to empower our people", but there's no empowerment when you baby us and nit-pick at everything we do!

If you accept a position here, it can be a fun job [sometimes], but be mindful that you will be micro-managed, and there will be a lot of fakery every where.
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Pros
discounted food, relatively flexible hours
Cons
short breaks, no compensation for gas/travel
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This Job Seriously Blows
Certified Trainer (Former Employee) –  TexasMay 15, 2013
When I started with this company, it was a FANTASTIC place to work! Management was great across the board, and they really looked after their employees the way you would with family. All was well...until the greedy corporate cancer invaded, the way it generally always does. It took a job where coworkers felt like family and turned it into a hateful, stress-ridden mess. The quality of new hires declined SHARPLY, and with that decline came the end of a civilized workplace. Theft skyrocketed, shrink abounded, and managers who cared even one whit were banished to the lower levels of rhymes-with-smell to be abused and castigated by their "superiors" regarding factors that there is no way to control. (Such as slow sales days, which became more and more frequent as the cancer changed everything that made Potbelly a pleasant dining experience.) New terminology was force-fed to employees, with cult-like phrases and Naziesque devotion to their new so-called ideals. The menu, which was really quite perfect exactly as it was, got tossed into utter chaos. A million choices replaced the sublime simplicity, requiring employees to question the customers TO DEATH at every single turn. And god forbid these million questions impact your speed of service! Not to mention that it created unnecessary tension when the customers would become surly or downright ugly about the forced interaction that was required to place an order for what is after all A SANDWICH/SALAD. New sandwiches and salad dressings appeared and disappeared with the regularity by which some change their underwear, resulting in even  more... more grief for the hapless employees who didn't get to make that decision. But hey, the bigwigs are seeing dollar signs...so who gives a flying f/a/r/t in space about the employees, right?? Food quality declined as cheaper ingredients were approved in place of the previously excellent choices available. Ridiculously high turnover became commonplace, as associates and management alike jumped ship as fast as they could. Those who actually stayed in hopes of promotions were dumped on in favor of yuppie outsiders who don't know their rhymes-with-bass from a hole in the ground. The chances of a manager backing you up if you upset a customer by actually following their rules were virtually nil. And benefits? HA. Don't make me laugh. I was promised at my date of hire that I only had to make it to the one-year mark to be eligible for benefits. What they neglected to mention is that in order to ACTUALLY qualify, you have to work 30 hours per week or more. And no associate is given 30 hours, EVER. You have to be in management to merit that kind of labor being on the schedule, so you just get diddled in a very dark place for as long as you work there. And since every manager worth their salt was defecting to greener pastures as fast as they could go, the company began selecting recruits for the vacated positions from literally the bottom of the barrel. People who couldn't drive their way out of a wet paper bag were suddenly in charge of operations they never gave a rhymes-with-nap about to begin with. What was already a rhymes-with-relish work environment became 100% unbearable. And when I was offered a rung onto a ladder out of the pit of despair, I grabbed on with all my might. Never mind that it was a temporary position. I simply couldn't tolerate the madness any longer.  less
Pros
nothing
Cons
everything
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Fast-paced and fun place to work during peak hours
Store Manager (Former Employee) –  Milwaukee, ILMarch 11, 2014
A typical day at Potbelly for a Manager would be to set up the shop and prepare your shop for the day. It is normal to go over shop schedules along with other morning paperwork and reports. Most of the work leads up to your big lunch rush. Your job is to be sure there are no speed-bumps along the way and that your staff and shop have what they need to have a great lunch and that all customers are taken care of and treated for.

I learned about sales, profit, customer service, time management and people management. During down times and transitions from lunch to dinner more projects are usually due plus weekly and monthly projects/reports are also due.

Co-workers depends heavily on your shop. Typically a very young crowd filled with high-school and college students/drop-outs. A lot of great personalities over all but dealing with turnover is always a plague for restaurants. This also means less of a bonus and more stress for your team. Most shops have a "core" group of "lifers" with a rotating supporting staff.

I would say the hardest part of the job are the changing expectations. Company wide as Potbelly has recently become a publicly traded company there are a lot of new marching orders. Each shop seems to have their own interpretations of these new orders and their own way of doing things to be sure they are meeting their bottom lines. Their are a lot of inconsistencies and communication problems from Corporate to shop locations and even from shop to shop. Especially a lot of change when changing districts or a new Market. Potbelly always keeps managers and shift-leads rotating
  more... and moving from store to store. Feeling comfortable is not something that is easily obtained or even encouraged.

The enjoyable part of the job is the actually busyness of the store during peak times. It is a great way to meet a lot of people and hone your people skills.

I greatly appreciated and loved working at Potbelly during my college years, but I am very disappointed in myself for trying to turn this into a career after receiving my bachelors.

My personal recommendation, unless you work for Potbelly corporate in Chicago, do not become anything higher than a shift-lead with this company.
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Pros
the people you meet and a free sandwich for break
Cons
the people wont last long and you probably wont have a break
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Great Sandwichs & Greater Problems
Certified Trainer (Former Employee) –  Chicago, ILOctober 6, 2015
Potbelly Sandwich Works not only has great sandwiches, but great people working for them. I grand opened and worked at the Harlem/Archer location when I first started with the company. This company is really dedicated to their employees. I did so well at the location I was at that my manager recommended me to be trained as a Certified Trainer. So, I went through all the steps and passed my certification in order to gain the title of Certified Trainer. Not sure what happened at that location, but everyone was not getting a lot of hours. Due to hardly no hours, I would work a few at that location and transport by bus to the Midway Airport location where I would work a few hours. I was given the opportunity to fully transfer to the Midway Airport and around this time is when I was put in the company system as a Certified Trainer. My beginning pay rate was $7.50 an hour and when I became a Certified Trainer I was supposed to get a raise from $7.50 to $12.00 an hour. When, I asked my new manager about when my new pay grade would be put in I was told that I just got a raise to $8.50 an hour. The manager told me that since the company just raised everyone who was at $7.50 an hour to $8.50 an hour that I would not be getting a raise to $12 an hour which is what Certified Trainers were making before company wide raise. This one reason alone broke my trust and faith in Potbelly Sandwich Works. Their management teams are great people and amazing, but when management does not fight for what an employee was promised then it changes the perspective of how they are seen. The enjoyable  more... part of the job at Midway was my co-workers, meeting people from different places and being able to work the 5am-1pm shift which allowed me to still have time with family and do whatever errands I had to for the day. The hardest part of this job is that if something goes on or goes wrong there is no union in place in order to fight for the employees. They would have to just deal or part ways with the company.  less
Pros
Free Lunch
Cons
Pay Rate
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Productive And Fun Workplace
BACKLINE COORDINATOR CATERING COORDINATOR (Current Employee) –  Chicago, ILNovember 22, 2013
I get all my orders for the day together, make sure the addresses on the orders are in our delivery zone. make sure we have the things they're asking for. get everything together, count my drawer and we ready for the day to begin. Then I make sure everything they ordered is in the bags, call my drivers and time to head out. after all my delivers is done, my job is to call all my customers back and ask them how great was their lunch. Must of my customers be surprise to receive a call from me and they thank me.(I've created a lot of customers) After I've done all my calls , I have to input all the information the customers said into the data base. Even the one that had a problem with they food. When I get a response like that, I apologize for they mistake that occurred, then I let them know I put they name in the book so the next time they order I'll make sure they get the item we messed up on.I like working with my co-workers they are so energetic(that's potbelly's) meaning when a customer came in to order we all have to call out what they ordered, but we add fun to it and we can be loud. If I have a lot of orders for the day, they always ask if i need help. The hardest part of the job is when a customers do a order online and they want like fifteen sandwiches and they want it delivered in a half of hour, remind you I got like twelve other order i'm getting together. I got to call that person and let them know that time is not available. They say well i'm gonna pick it up(presser) but I get in together for them just to keep my customer and keep them happy.The most enjoyable part  more... of the job is keeping my customers happy and them knowing me by my first name. say like i'm on vacation, when i get back a regular customer call and be like you cant missed know days because your co-workers cant never get my order right like you do. They make me feel special.  less
Pros
half off on lunch
Cons
don't get a break
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OK pay but not worth it
General Manager (Former Employee) –  Chicago, ILJanuary 30, 2014
General managers are expected to work a minimum of 10 hours a day. That never seems to be an issue as you normally end up doing 12 to 14 because the first 10 hours you are a very high paid sandwich maker, and then you still need to do your management stuff. Benefits are OK but could be better. They give terrible raises and the bonus they offer is extremely difficult to get. The current CEO has driven away most of the people that made this company the quirky sandwich shop that made it such a success. If you have any type of life this is not a company that you want to work for. My life is much happier and all around better since I have left. I forgot that life could have some joy in it while I was there. You are expected to retain most employees year to year, but can not give merit raises for a great job. Associate raises average out to be about $.12 a year so don't expect to make any money. Go work anywhere else the pay may be the same BUT expectations are much more reasonable. Beware they will make it sound like the best job ever and all the fun stuff that the company does for its people. It has been over 5 years since they did anything fun for the store level employees, they wont even help stores have Christmas parties. The only thing nice I have to say is somehow they do have a few great people who work very hard there and I do hope that they wake up soon and leave to company that will appreciate them.
Pros
i got out
Cons
employees have to pay for food. managers get no break. hourly pay is terrible.
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potbelly
associate (Current Employee) –  Madison, WISeptember 23, 2014
from when i come in i am greeted by my coworkers boss, i go into the back of the house(boh). i then get set my stuff down and get my apron, i then come to the front of the house and clock in. I then check the task list of what employees are working that day, what shift they are working, and the station that they are/ have been assigned too, after checking the sheet, i go and front, wiping the tables and checking the bathrooms. after fronting i go to my maneger and double check to make sure i am should be at the assigned station or shall i switch up with someone. my coworkers and bosses, they are one of a kind all a big difference in personality, but we all get along well while we get our tasks done and maintain a professional service to our customers. we work very great in teams helping eachother while having really good comunication skills upon one another.

the hardest part of the day would be threw out the day you have those customers who are not happy when they enter because of a stressful day and we try and try to make them happy even offering a free cookie because of there stress or unhappyness. we do our best to stride and get smiles from everyone from the time of entering the store to the time they leave.
the funnest part of the job thats short and sweat,
from the time i walk in and get greated by my peers to the time i clock out and say see ya guys later.!
Pros
live music, fun fast pace
Cons
short breaks no benifits hard to get hours
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Busy but fun work place. Great atmosphere
Certified Trainer (Current Employee) –  Fort Worth, TXNovember 29, 2012
On an average day , I come in to work around 6 A.M. and prep for the coming lunch rush, Lunch rush starts to come in around 11 and peaks at 11:45 (sometimes with a line going to the door). After lunch I break my equipment down, clean it, restock drinks and leave around 2/2:30 in the afternoon.

Being a transplant from Florida I learned more about the Fort Worth culture than anything else. The job it self is not very challenging and I had already learned most skills already from previous jobs.

Our manager is a very good manager, he works hard and helps us out a lot. He is not the most positive person I have ever met, but he's focused and leads well.

My co-workers are eccentric and eclectic. As a rule Potbelly tries to hire positive and fun employees so it makes for a good work experience.

The hardest part of the job is also the most enjoyable part and that's the lunch rush. We keep pretty busy with the long lines and last minute catering orders. It can get pretty hectic at times but it's the most challenging part of the job that I know well and therefore the most enjoyable.
Pros
great atmosphere, good crew, live music
Cons
mediocre benefits, low pay.
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A company to grow with
Assistant Store Manager (Current Employee) –  Northern VirginiaApril 15, 2015
It's a "family" based company, basically a corporation trying to play the "mom and pop" sandwich shop. I actually loved working for this company until I moved up into management, even then I still enjoyed it. There were company changes that i didn't agree with after it became "public", when a lot less focus was moved from caring for the employees to other areas. Being an Associate (entry, bottom of the totem pole) allows a lot of freedom, but lower-average hourly pay. Once you move into management (especially the higher you move up) you start spending more and more time at work and personal life and Holidays aren't "important" anymore. Being an Assistant Manager, requires 50 hours a week (usually 10 hours a day), mostly on your feet, and depending on the volume of your shop... good luck getting a break. But hey, there's benefits. Providing excellent customer service and talking with regulars really makes the difference, and with the right team you can really work though anything,
Pros
Easy to move up, welcoming teams, pay is okay
Cons
Short breaks if you're able to take one, long hours on your feet
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Good Food with live music
Server (Current Employee) –  Chicago, ILJanuary 27, 2016
My days at work tend to vary from doing deliveries, prepping food, training new associates, and sometimes cash handling. Based from what I've learned from the company so far is the overall work ethics on how to be a team player, learning to handle intense moments on your own, and being able to take charge on showing new associates what they need to know about food handling and providing excellent customer service day in, and day out. Management and co-workers, have been in both ups and downs as of lately. I do believe there should be more managers who are willing to take charge at their jobs rather than not. This could also be said about co-workers as well. The hardest part of the job, is not being able to provide the customers with what they want, and it's usually caused by not having enough products on hand (shake's stuff, breads, certain kinds of meats, and etc). The most enjoyable part of the job, is having a great time and laugh with the people that you work with and serve.
Pros
Employees get 50%, on foods and drinks.
Cons
Employees are sometimes not able to take their breaks.
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Productive workplace with a welcoming community along with a nice and fun atmosphere.
Associate (Current Employee) –  Roseville, MNOctober 2, 2014
A typical day at work for me is staring around 5p and working a closing shift. As I arrive, the dinner rush is just beginning and my job is to focus on customers along with completing my closing tasks when I can. I've learned many valuable skills including time management, how to keep a strong work ethic, working with a cash register, and how hard work really pays off in the long run. The management and co-workers are very fun and nice while they are still professional. I have very flexible hours and the managers are always available to help if there's ever a problem or concern. I would say that the hardest part of my job is how tedious all of the cleaning tasks are that must be completed by the end of the day. It's sometimes difficult to finish the job on time. The most enjoyable part of my job is definitely the fun and happy community I've become a part of.
Pros
i enjoy coming to work because of how fun it is, nice customers, there's always something new to learn, 50% off all food items
Cons
cleaning the bathrooms/taking out the trash
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Typical of any sandwich shop, but with worse management.
Customer Service (Former Employee) –  Royal Oak, MINovember 15, 2012
Worked here for a solid 8 months and left solely due to poor management. Managers are inexperienced, ill-prepared to deal with the issues that arise, and incapable of human interaction in a productive, respectful way.

Staff was wonderful and everyone is very close, almost to the point of cliques. People who do not fit in are phased out within a week or two, basically made so miserable they up and quit. The people who are "cool" and "interesting" end up sticking around and wasting their potential for minimum wage.

Food safety is not a priority and hand-washing, food prep, and dishwashing are all sketchy. Never saw someone do something bad to the food, but if your spatula is dirty or the grill hasn't been cleaned, it's probably just as bad as someone spitting on your sandwich.
Pros
short shifts, ability to cross train easily.
Cons
terrible pay, terrible management, not respectful of availability.
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Fun place to start a career and learn management skills.
General Manager (Former Employee) –  Bethesda, MDApril 28, 2015
Potbelly is a very unique place to work. A day in the life of working at Potbelly can bring many different things. For the most part the customers are awesome and very exciting to converse with. The management (corporate) has their ups and downs but they try their best to help you. The associates, shifts and store managers are great. With the right leader, everyone for the most part works great together and sticks together through adversity. There can be some crazy days at Potbelly but there are some really good ones too. I have great memories as well as a few bad memories but I never regret working for Potbelly the 8 years that I did. I started there when I was 16 as an associate and was a General manager the last 4 years of my time there, Potbelly pretty much helped raise me and taught me some skills that I use till this day.
Pros
Schedule flexibility, half off on food, great people
Cons
maintenance team, food supplier
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Created a fun atmosphere
Shift Leader (Current Employee) –  MAJune 25, 2015
A typical day involves gathering all the facts for the day (sales forecasted, weather, associate line-up, prep sheets ect) and then making a plan for your shift to not only ensure a great customer experience, but also one where the best employees are put in positions that aide their strong skills. I have learned a lot in the years I have worked here, from food safety to improving upon my management and team work skills. The best part of the job is interacting with the customers, recognizing the regulars and getting to know people you would otherwise have no connection to. Something as simple as a sandwich and a smile can really make someone's day turn around, and I like to think that I help make people's day, one sandwich at a time.
Pros
free food, customer interaction, great coworkers and enviorment
Cons
short breaks, possible injury/burns
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Productive, fun and fair company!
Associate (Current Employee) –  Cincinnati, OHAugust 19, 2013
I've really enjoyed working for Potbelly; many places I've worked for say they value their employees as well as their products but Potbelly is the first where it's completely true! As can be expected of a sandwich shop, a typical day consists of preparing food and cleaning the store, preparing for lunch and dinner rushes and making sure the store is in great shape for our customers. My managers are always full of energy and are consistently on task, setting a great example for myself and my coworkers on how to run a successful store. There's not much that's difficult about being an associate at a sandwich shop aside from the occasional difficult customer. I thoroughly enjoy my coworkers and my regular customers, making every day truly the most enjoyable part of the job.
Pros
half-off menu prices, great staff, flexible hours.
Cons
competition for hours makes it difficult for advancement.
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Great environment, located in Chicago's Midway Airport! Awesome crowd and co-workers
Cashier/Customer Service Representative (Former Employee) –  Chicago, ILApril 23, 2012
My day would begin the same pretty much, go through TSA security every morning. Swipe my I.D. badge to begin my day which would consist of making sure my register was accurate and double checking around the store to make sure things were in place. My co-workers are what really made the job. I still have close friendships even though I am not employed there. The most enjoyable time of day was when the long lines went down and there was a minute or so to catch a laugh with my co-workers! Downtime is rare, because lines are forming from 5am til close.
Pros
50% off meals, and the location is close to my house
Cons
very early starting hours example: 4:30 am shifts
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Fun, lively, busy place to work
Cashier/Food Preparation (Current Employee) –  Chicago, ILApril 8, 2014
I work at one of the busiest Potbelly shops and sometimes it can get chaotic, to put it nicely. It is a very fun place to work, my co-workers and I always joking around and the GMs and Managers join in to when we aren't super busy. The fun atmosphere that most places lack is what keeps me at Potbelly because the pay rate SUCKS! I only make a little bit above minimum wage and that, especially in Chicago, is hard to live off of. Typical day: I walk in (they are flexible with time as long as they know ahead of time you will be late) clock-in, then depending on where they have me that day I start work.
Pros
atmosphere, hours, flexibility, 1/2 off food
Cons
1 meal a shift!, pay rate, 1/2 off lunch.
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Enjoyable workplace if the right people were working
Associate (Former Employee) –  Brookfield, WISeptember 8, 2013
A typical day at Potbelly's felt like I was in high school all day. There was gossip and slight drama between the staff. Through the 2 years I was there, I learned more about patience and helping out others even if it was not necessary. I became more independent but also work well with a team. My co-workers were always a good time unless someone was having a bad day and I would do my best to be positive. At times it was the hardest to bite my tongue with my superiors when things were wrong. Even though there may have been many hard days to deal with, I had many laughs with customers and friends in Potbelly's.
Pros
great food
Cons
short breaks, no healthcare, negative attitudes
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Fast-paced, friendly environment.
Associate (Former Employee) –  Rockford, ILJuly 11, 2015
Normally very busy everyday from around 10am until 2pm, especially with the amount of catering and delivery we can go through. Closing specifically would work usually from 4 or 5pm until 10pm-12am. Management was very friendly but did not care if there was a customer if you needed to be told something. Co-worker varied; most were decent human-beings, others were very rude to each other and selfish. The hardest part of this job was having to be as knowledgable as you had to be to work efficiently in a short period of time. All in all, the job wasn't terrible, it was just schedule-conflict usually and it didn't quite follow through with its potbelly plan.
Pros
half off meal
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Creating masterpieces through sandwiches and salads
Associate (Former Employee) –  Hanover, MDJune 14, 2012
I was an associate at Potbelly Sandwich Works. I enjoyed the atmosphere and the people that surrounded me during my shift. The managers and the other associates made my work day feel like I was not even at work. We strived to acheive customer satisfaction by not only our food but our high level energy we had from the time we clocked in until the end of our shift. The hardest part of my job was remembering the order of the toppings that went on the sandwich. I asked the customer if they would like "Mayo, mustard or Hots" on their sandwich. Their response would be "lettuce, onions, hots pickle and mayo". I would have to go back in order from a list and place the toppings in the correct order that they go on the sandwich. Other then that nothing was that hard. I enjoyed every minute of working for the company.
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