RadioShack

3.2K reviews

RadioShack Employee Reviews

Found 3,153 reviews matching the search
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Technically this is Target Mobile
Sales Representative (Former Employee) –  California, CaliforniaMay 5, 2012
When I first started working for Target Mobile (RadioShack), it was a great company. The pay was good, the store management was fine, and the goals were in a reasonable range.
The job is simple and easy enough... To the naked eye. Selling phones for AT&T, Verizon, and T-Mobile, you are Upgrading, Creating New Accounts, and Adding Lines to Preexisting lines. The training is LONG but thorough and it was a little hard to get used to but easy after a while.

But now it seems like this company has made a turn for the worst.
Going through multiple district managers in the time I have been there, all of them were stating they were doing their job but in reality they did nothing but demotivate employees, degrade them (I would know since there was a district manager that said something behind my back which I found extremely disrespectful and unprofessional), make them feel like they are stupid, put them down for things not in their control, and making them/us feel like we are all expendable. I don't think it's hard to see why they go through so many DM's.

Not to mention the lack of advertising for this section of the company. RadioShack has plenty of Advertisements on TV and various other places for their phones. Target Mobile on the other hand has a piece of paper in the Sunday Target ad. There is no sign on a the outside of Target or Inside of Target giving any indication that they sell phones. The only way you would know is if you saw the Sunday Ad, Word of Mouth, or you Walked by the Kiosk.
They don't put ads on the TV because it's too expensive apparently. They said that because
  more... the kiosks aren't performing like they should be, why should they give them advertisement on TV or other places?... Apparently Target Mobile is too small of a sector to invest that type of money into.

HEY RADIOSHACK/TARGET MOBILE: Did you ever consider maybe that may actually help your sales considering majority of people that go into Target don't even know you exist?

NO. It is not the employee's job to advertise for your company. You have a market and PR department. THAT'S WHAT THEY ARE THERE FOR.

Maybe if you guys put a little more thought into advertising and a little less effort into talking to employees like they are nothing and worthless, you actually might hit goals! Weird how that works, huh?

So aside from the lack of advertisement and the horrible district managers, what's good about this company? Not too much really.

The pay used to be good but recently I heard from an old co-worker that they changed the pay rates.
And Target Mobile you get paid based on Hourly and Commission.
You start base at $8.18
The SPIFF tiers were actually really great. If you get 70 SPH a week, you'd triple your commissions (Which wasn't extremely hard to hit if you worked less hours and you sold at least one smartphone a day). And commissions would be anywhere from 2.50 just for a simple basic phone on an upgrade to $50 with a new contract and other features. But regardless if you doubled or tripled your spiff, you would still get the regular commission on a phone.
Oh those were the days.
Now from what I am told, they changed the tiers to the following:
If you sell less than 80 SPH a week, you get A ($0.01) PENNY... Yes a PENNY for every phone sold. After 125 SPH, you get $12 per phone sold regardless of if it's a new phone on a new account, add a line, or upgrade (And yes, those all used to have various higher and lower payments than $12.50). And after 160 SPH (Which I NEVER HIT when I worked for the company) you get $22 per phone sold regardless of New Account, Add A Line or Upgrade.
Now I'm not saying that's impossible to hit, but it's pretty hard considering you work for a company where you have to Hawk in a Target where most people that walk in there aren't even in the market for a phone.
My old co-workers paycheck went from a solid six bills every couple weeks to three hundred. That's working twenty hours a week (Target Mobile is part Time).

So now that the main three downfalls of this company have been listed, lets talk about how honest they are.

From what I remember, RadioShack promotes selling with Honesty and Integrity.
But they would always tell me to sell what we have and push a different phone if we didn't have access to a phone the guest wanted (They weren't too good with stocking the most popular phones).
I never did that. I always just told the customer we'll call them when we have it in stock or to just go to a corporate store if they really wanted it that bad.
I only once had a guest return a phone because I actually abided by selling with honesty and integrity where as I knew plenty of people in the company that had a lot of returns because they were just selling what they could.

I could go on and on about how horrible this company is but I think I've said enough.

I'm glad I left when I did and now I know plenty of people among the company who are leaving including store managers.

If you're looking for a part time job, look else where. This company has gone to the dark side where they don't have cookies. I wouldn't be surprised if they shut it down soon.
  less
Was this review helpful?Yes2No
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Learn great skills -- and don't get rewarded for it
sales associate (Former Employee) –  Las Vegas, NVDecember 21, 2015
RadioShack is a great company to work for if you're trying to pick up new skills, want to learn how NOT to run a business, or just want to have a part-time job while you focus your attention on more important and deserving tasks (examples school or a real job). Their customer service standards are excellent, and their components and electronic systems training is good - if you pay attention. RadioShack develops a very active-listener customer service skill set. One must listen and picture the customer's situation and needs, identify potential problems or missing information, and recommend them complete solutions that solve the problems they came to you with - and some they didn't realize they had.

In a day at RadioShack, expect at least ten customers to come in telling you they "don't know what it's called (or what number it is), but they'll know it when they see it," of which maybe three or four actually are capable of discerning it from the over 9000 other things that look similar to it, but the ones that can't are generally upset that you can't pick something out based off their vague and woefully incomplete descriptions of things you carry millions of varieties of. "I'm sorry ma'am but when you tell me you're looking for a cable, it means practically nothing to me. Is it a power cable? A USB connection? Audio cable? Telephone or ethernet, maybe? WHAT DO YOU USE IT FOR?" Button cell batteries, audio adapters and fuses tend to look pretty similar. As far as button cell batteries go, for car key FOBs, your two safest bets are 2032 and 2016. Watch batteries can be a toss-up
  more... but mostly 76 and 357. Expect to be told by 1/5 of your customers how much cheaper they can get (X product) literally anywhere else in town, or from Amazon. On the other hand, you do sometimes get really cool customers that are great to converse with, and often know a great deal about electronic projects. These customers are usually more than willing to share their knowledge with you if you simply ask.

The hardest part by far of the job is dealing with upper-management decisions, and customers frustrated at you because they don't know how to help you help them. Also, having to take a product return from a customer you told in ten different ways how their idea wouldn't work is pretty frustrating.

The merchandising and management decisions are made without consultation of your store, and you can expect them to be designed for a store that looks completely different and is stocked in no way, shape, or form similar to your store. Still, they expect you to make do with poorly-thought-out planograms and vague visual merchandising goals. There's no doubt the job requires and refines critical thinking and visual-spatial skills.

After the company was bought out of bankruptcy by Standard General, the management decisions seemed incompetent. Before, they seemed deliberate sabotage.

If you want to work at RadioShack, prepare to have to sell customers shoddy-quality imported from China products at ridiculously inflated prices. Prepare to be expected to pretend to be busy even when the store looks fantastic, you've read all the news and emails, and there's not a customer in sight. Prepare to not get a raise no matter how long you work there, and not get a bonus no matter how well you perform. Prepare to be expected to be a high-quality employee while you're compensated at minimum wage + a paltry commission.
  less
Pros
Good training, develops a good skill set, some really interesting and knowledgeable customers, a job based on getting to tell people how wrong their ideas are
Cons
poor compensation, no advancement, unstable company, missing/terrible corporate management, high expectations with no incentives, retail work environment, lack of reason to stay with the company
Was this review helpful?Yes3No
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
SELL SELL SELL CELLPHONES
Sales Associate (Former Employee) –  West Dundee, ILFebruary 5, 2014
Radioshack is a great company to earn some commission and get your foot in the wireless industry. They push you to cell phones, but expect you to know everything else. Pay is decent, and do not expect to make this a career for yourself, because managers do not get paid well. The store I worked for was fun, the team was well put together, we all got our jobs done. It was fun because it was in the mall. Everything was well, until someone robbed our store for 10 phones, and no one seen it happen. it was our busiest weekend of the year, and we all were busy. A few days later I found out we had no phones, because a customer was trying to commit fraud. Later my manager realized that we got robbed, and we all started to think how it happened. none of us were suspicious of any wrong doing, which made it worst, because radioshack had to blame someone.
So my assistant manager explained how this happened before, and they let everyone go within 2 months. he was excluded because he was the only one off the day phones went missing. This time all of us were working which means we can all be cut for any reason. I tried to find the phones online on numerous sites, and didn't get any luck. I decided to get cameras in there, and my manager helped me install cameras. I did whatever I could to try to find these phones. We had an employee who was hired 2 weeks before the phones went missing, and she honestly had no business in retail, she had horrible english, and didn't know what was going on. She quit 2 weeks after this happened. Which if it was an employee it had to have been her. but Radio Shack
  more... was still not satisfied. A couple weeks later, the two female coworkers ganged up and made up a story that I sent a customers nudes to myself. They told my manager, and he wanted to talk to me, but one of the girls insisted that he'd tell Hr right away, because thats bad. my manager told hr right away, and the next day asked me what happened, and I didn't know what he was talking about. They were talking about something that happened 3 months before, which was when I was adding minutes on a customer's phone, and when I turned on the phone, her instagram was up, which she had pictures of her in exotic lingerie, and these pictures were from her backside. my coworker seen it and was in shock. We talked about it, and I told her I almost threw the phone, because it was just right there. we laughed it off, and forgot about the situation until she brought it up 3 months later and added a twist, that would for sure get me fired. I told my manager what really happened, and he told me he already told hr on me, and that they would determine my fate. He was a good manager, but he lets these girls get to his head. He hires hideous looking girls, and becomes friends with them outside of work with his wife to go to church.

This place is a fun place to work at, just be careful with the girls, if there is a hispanic girl with extreme acne, glasses, and her name starts with an E, be careful because she is a snake, she would boss you around and thinks shes special because the manager and her are friends, and watch each other's kids. thats actually why she hates me, because i got tired of being bossed by someone who is also a part time employee like me. we got into an argument, and she told me we should agree not to tell the manager, but later she tells him herself. If there is also an ugly girl with deep acne, and her name is a man's name that starts with an A, don't trust her either, she would be friends, with you then back stab you.
  less
Pros
great entryway into the wireless industry
Cons
little pay and no raises.
Was this review helpful?Yes3No3
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Interesting environment to work in; always something new in electronics!
Store Manager -to- District Manager (Former Employee) –  Mobile, AL, Macon, GAJanuary 23, 2014
As a Store Manager, a typical workday consisted of inventory reviews, effective communication with management, staff, and lateral network, (to include emails, log entries, phone digests/calls, etc.), goals review/establishment, and financials and scheduling -as needed, etc.
PK was essential to ensure that customer's needs were tended-to adequately and correctly. Also, that observation of a person's actions (to include non-verbals) became as important to the sales process as the verbalization itself.
In management, it was crucial to understand the importance of proper Team development; that any individual exhibiting a cancerous attitude and/or display required immediate attention and/or dismissal. For myself, Rule #1 has always been to adequately convey to my Team that my job is to make their job easier -so that the customer experience becomes unmatched.
Similarly, recruitment, selection and development of Assistant Managers, team supervisors and leads required pinpoint accuracy.
The hardest part of the job was in the keeping up with the number of reports being either duplicated in request and/or injected, as well as the hours necessary to be effective.
Conversely, the most enjoyable part of the job was in the ideas-generation and development of either product presentation or merchandising detail... ultimately, seeing the many successes earned by a polished Team is quite rewarding. Being Number-1 tends to drive the desire to go further to an even greater extent.

As a District Manager, dealing with (in some cases) well over 35 corporate stores -spread out over multiple States,
  more... the chief focus is on both store performance and individual development -to include Store Managers, Manager Trainees, and even Associates. Also, at this level vendor relationships become much more important to the business. Ultimately, it boiled down to creating an effective process of communication where information being passed was not only timely, but receptive (and responsive) as well.
In this position, learning the art of prioritization becomes essential. The appearance that everyone wants everything, immediately could easily lend itself to a sink-or-swim state of being. Learning what has priority over another then becomes crucial in moving a district in the correct direction.
In short, although management encompasses fiscal awareness, corporate mission, individual (and personal) training, and sound business practice, still, management is always about people. Train them right; treat them right, and they will always outperform any projections put to paper.
Co-workers at this level become a major resource in sound attenuation; meaning, they provide the "ear" that is so-oft times necessary for that balanced approach to things to be given fair review. Their experience and tenured advise provides the counterbalance before one seriously contemplates jumping.
The hardest -and yet most rewarding part of this job is in the challenge of determining where shortfalls exist in a store or individual's performance that has been falling off of their goals and/or expectations.
  less
Pros
having multiple opportunities to show-off one's talent and/or learned experience.
Cons
not having enough crayons to effectively color-in the level of understanding needed by some members.
Was this review helpful?Yes2No
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Fun for part time, but don't go in expecting a good career
Manager-in-Training (Current Employee) –  Pineville, LAMay 19, 2014
RadioShack is a good company to work for.. Provided you are part time and you don't really need the cash.

The company offers minimum wage to all, excluding the Assistant Manager and up. Even then, the Manager-in-Training still gets paid minimum wage. Though they do offer 2% sales commission on most sales, that 2% won't get you very far unless you live in a high-traffic area.

I understand their view of "You sell more, you make more," and in theory, it seems fair. However, they fail to keep in mind the stores that do not see enough customers to warrant more than maybe $5 commission per day. Additionally, since they announced the closing of 1,100 of their stores (now redacted with 200 planned closings), many customers have avoided coming into a RadioShack, and with good reason.

As assistant manager, I was bumped up to 8.70/hr plus that same 2% commission. However, my position title was changed to Manger-in-Training with reduced pay (back down to 7.25) without so much as a warning. I simply noticed on my next paycheck, 2 weeks later, and brought it up to be responded with an, "Oh, yeah, your store no longer qualifies for an Assistant Manger position," from the District Manager.
All while keeping the same responsibilities, I no longer find RadioShack a company I enjoy working for.

However, on a more positive note towards them..

Many items are quite pricey, but employees get a good discount on many of these items - up to 50% off on many RadioShack branded items. These items are generally pretty well built and worth the price at about half off.

My co-workers are among the best
  more... people I have met, and I would probably not mind staying as very part time just to continue my work interactions with them.

The people that come in are usually fantastic. They are generally understanding if an associate isn't quite knowledgable in one particular area, such as stereos or parts, and will help us learn. Their stories are rarely dul. It brings such a joyful feeling when you help someone else learn something new to them, or you hear a word of praise or gratitude.

Overall, if you are offered Manager-in-Training, Assistant Manager, or Store manager, BE VERY CAUTIOUS. Store mangers only get 1.5% of their sales commissions, and expecetd sales numbers aren't too uncommonly near-impossible.

If you are a Store Manager, you will be overworked, and underpaid for the amount of work you do. (And the store will be your new home.)

If you are an Assistant Manger, chances are you will be underworked for the amount of work you do.

If you are a Manager-in-Training, you will be overworked and underpaid.

If you are a Sales Associate, you may be underpaid depending on how much your store manager/ASM/MIT/DM expects of you.

Again, if you don't need the money, by all means, work for RadioShack if you like electronics. It is a fun environment. Much less so the higher up the ladder you get.
But if you have any bills, you better just keep on looking.
  less
Pros
good discounts, enjoyable coworkers and customers
Cons
pay, management, expectations from upper management, hours
Was this review helpful?Yes2No2
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
NOT a Company I would wish to work for again.
Senior Store Manager (Former Employee) –  Medford, ORSeptember 9, 2013
OK for Sales Associates, except that full time employees cannot expect more than 32 hours/week.

Store Managers are required to work 6 days a week, or 56-60 hours upwards. The Corporation emphasizes the value of Family Life/Work balance, then makes it near impossible to achieve.

The absolute worst part of working there was that both the District Manager, and his Secretary were the worst kind of Bullies that would lie, and threaten to get their way. Promises made are not kept. NOT a good management style, as it increases stress and amounts to nothing less than mental cruelty. (this may be different in another district).

Unrealistic and ever increasing targets are constantly being imposed, so that District Managers, and higher, can look good to their superiors.

Customers are getting increasingly angered by being pestered for protection plans, batteries, names, addresses, email addresses and telephone numbers.

Store Managers now have NO autonomy, they have been reduced to nothing more than Senior Sales Associates, everything is now micromanaged to the last detail. The Corporation gives lip service to being interested in what managers have to say, but never follow it up.

Shop-lifting is a huge problem, with the absence of meaningful Security equipment in the stores, despite Store Managers asking for it over the years, the losses then get blamed directly on the store managers.

Most of the tenured experienced staff, (the most expensive), are being let go and replaced by cheaper youngsters straight out of high school, with no experience.

A Full Time Store Manager can expect
  more... about $12.30/hour compared with the industry average for a Store Manager of about $19.50/hour. (source: Job Council)

Human Resources only exists to protect the Corporation from legal action.

RS has had multiple CEOs in a short period of time, who get paid considerably more than the President of the United States, despite their consistent failure to improve the Company.

Make no mistake, with the Competition from Online shopping, this is one Brick and Mortar Store who's days are numbered.

On the positive side, It used to be a good place to work, and I did enjoy working with the customers, I took great pride in my store, and the quality of my staff, all of whom have been promoted. I used to be proud to say I worked there, but no longer.
  less
Pros
it is a job
Cons
see below
Was this review helpful?Yes1No
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Always maintaining a positive attitude in my work environment.
store manager (Former Employee) –  Westbury, NYJune 16, 2014
A typical day would be me counting the cash register and reviewing daily reports from yesterdays refunds and sales. Identifying and problems or issues my employees might have encountered the night before. Then reviewing the profit and sales for the day/week/month and how far up/down we are in them. Then evaluating who needs my immediate attention on there metrics and addressing it before it becomes bigger issue in the future. I'm always looking over the store emails of my District or Regional manager has sent out for the day and setting up a schedule for those duties to get done for the day. Radioshack has taught me a lot about how important customer satisfaction is to it's customers and my team. As well as how to really understand how important it is to listen to the customers needs. Just by doing these two customer satisfaction needs, it opens up a wider range for you to be able to sell the customer anything. By asking the right questions you could easily find there needs, as well show them the other needs they originally didn't come in for. For an example, they walk in for a HDMI cord but after talking to you who asked open ended questions they realized they might need more then just a cord. It's not like your pushing sales onto your customers no not at all, your just keeping them aware of these amazing deals they might missing out on. My employees have monthly goals they I review with them daily. To keep them on track I set new daily goals so they can surpass there original goals and make the better at over achieving.In order to give my team the drive when I'm not around  more... we have these contest and even awards are given out to award the over achievers for their great performance. Sometimes my employees need that extra push if I'm not around so I set up these high expectations from to prove to me who I can count on and most of the time it works. They keep up with my high standards and in some case surpass my own goals.Through out the whole work day the most enjoyable part of my job is helping my customers. When they enter my store they know exactly who I am greet me with the same welcome back greeting I gave them when they first walked into my store. In some cases they decide to spread the word and bring back some friends to share similar experiences.  less
Pros
401k, heathcare, some stocks in the company
Cons
n/a
Was this review helpful?Yes1No
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Was never "a job", at least not until the final months
Sr. Laptop Technician (Former Employee) –  Fort Worth, TXNovember 14, 2013
It may seem like the same old thing, day in and day out, but it was much more nuanced. We were never just another number(s), or mind-numbed robots doing repetitive tasks. Most of the technical and support staff were really good people to know and often asked the personal advice of others.

My manager (name redacted) was where my primary loyalties lied. I always told him that he knows best for the company, to place me exactly where he needs me, and I never let him or the company down. He was always very supportive of me when I was going through some personal issues (Divorce and child custody hearings, emergency medical, and twice having to voluntarily leave work due to extreme personality conflicts with a coworker. It was far better that I leave early before getting official disciplinary action, he listened to my grievances, understood my position, and approved the early dismissal), and was equally as supportive when I was volunteered for some new assignments within the Depot.

The best part of working there was I loved what I did, and was exceptional at it. Early on, I devised and streamlined a very effective method of conducting needed repairs on the laptops and all-in-one desktops, I was always ahead of the 40 units per week work requirements, and oftentimes was helping others with technical tasks or questions. Simply put, if you love what you do, you'll never work a day in your life. That has been me for a very long time, spanning multiple employers, up until the last couple of months at Radioshack.

Nature truly abhors a vacuum, and while my days at Radioshack have long
  more... since ended my passions and desires to further my knowledge haven't subsided. I took this "time off", if you will, to complete my Cisco studies and earn my CCENT and CCNA certifications over the summer. Tarrant County College beckons me again in January, this time for some CCNP skills. While I hope for the same successes I had there last year, I am really just having fun doing what I love to do, and let the chips fall where they may.  less
Pros
lots of diverse people and lifestyles to work with
Cons
sometimes the bureacracy gets in the way of productivity
Was this review helpful?YesNo
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
You Will Do A Lot of Price Changes
Assistant Manager (Current Employee) –  Macedonia, OHDecember 2, 2012
On a typical day at work, you will process almost as many returns as you do sales. With each sale, you are tasked with badgering customers with several offers which include offering service plans on every item they purchase, collecting email addresses to send customers a coupon, asking customers to check their upgrade eligibility on their cell service in order to later contact them several times when it is time for their upgrade, trying to upsell the customer on the current battery special and finally asking the customer if they would like to donate to the Livestrong foundation. After awhile you can tell the customers are more irritated than anything because they start to just cut you off as you start asking a question.

The rest of your day will be spent scanning merchandise, rearranging displays for no apparent reason, and printing new price tags off on a regular basis. There will not be a day in which you will not have to print out and put up price tags.

The majority of your time will be spent trying to upsell customers on things that relate to what they are buying. For example, you would want to upsell extra cables or handsets for home phones, along with extra batteries for cordless phones. Half the time, people just want that one part that is $1.25 and don't want anything else. The bad thing is, small sales hurt your performance rating. You will probably end up having one great sale and then 20 small sales that will basically ruin your great sale.

The district management team spends more time degrading associate performance than actually praising and congratulating employees.
  more... This makes you not want to work harder because the hard work you already do in trying to close a quality sale goes unnoticed. On top of all the extra things they want you to do, they have very poor benefits and pay. Expect to have minimum wage plus small commission payouts if you decide to work here. If you are lucky to get part time, you will notice it is not worth it as you can make more money by working part time and having fewer sales. THe more sales you make the worse your performance becomes. A part timer who works 20 hours a week and has $1,000 in sales will have better performance than a full time employee who works 40 hours a week and has $20,000 worth of sales at the end of the month, and it is all because the part timers are less likely to get several small sales that will ruin their bigger sales.  less
Pros
two 15 minute breaks, a half decent discount program
Cons
a lot of work for poor pay and poor health benefits, upper management that talks down upon everyone
Was this review helpful?YesNo
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
It's a Job...
Store Manager (Current Employee) –  IndianaMarch 16, 2014
The work/life balance is horrible. They expect you to live for the Company and nothing more. The compensation is not on par with the level of commitment they ask. The advancement is non-existent due to unrealistic expectations to more forward. The sales expectations themselves are unrealistic; transition to every sale providing a customer a cellular phone.

Management seems to constantly be changing its mind; it is a very bi-polar culture. There is not on steady path at the Regional level, probably because out RSD leaves and goes home at 3:00 everyday.

The only thing positive about the job is that inside your own store you can effect whatever you want. You can choose to push cell phones on people or not. You create the dog and pony show for your boss when they come in but outside of that it's very hands off. Unless they tell you to roll over for a customer which is pretty much all the time.

There is a 48-hour+ a week minimum for store managers. If your store is not open from 10-9 almost everyday then you will be stuck working back to back open to closes if you want 2 days off, which will likely not be in a row either. I have worked 6 days a week for almost a year now. I don't know if I should laugh or cry.

There is no job security. It you do not hit your sales plan you will find yourself out on your bottom in nothing flat. There is no understanding of people-factors..i.e..not every wants to buy a 90+ a month cell phone plan.

It's a paycheck. I haven't checked out because the one thing my parents instilled in me was a set of blue-collar morals and work ethics.

Truthfully,
  more... as a re-read this and thing about it, don't go to work for this company. It's not that they will be out of business; they will never go away. It's just a bad company to work for. They cloud the expectations in the interview with the promise of oodles of riches but in return they take your life, your happiness, your family life, in some cases your marriage and in return you get high blood pressure, unrealistic expectations, hostile work culture and a paycheck that is actually on par with a cab driver.

Which is why I am on Indeed trying to find a new job.
  less
Pros
technology.
Cons
idiotic upper management, lousy pay, little possibility of advancement, once of those silly jobs where they ask "how much do you want to make?"
Was this review helpful?Yes3No
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Great place to work!!! Watch out for certain management
Assistant Store Manager (Former Employee) –  Lapeer, MIFebruary 2, 2013
I loved working here, I sold more contracts than anyone else in my store, I made great money, had a great time with helping the customers, made my store look fabulous, and worked very well with other employees. I was promoted three times in a five month period of time and was literally a month into my training to be a Store Manager. Then my Store Manager actually came into work one day and handed me his keys and walked out, quit right there on spot, another two employees followed him that week, and it was me "a Manager in Training" and two sales employees. I was told to "act as Store Manager" until the position was filled. Meanwhile I was not able to make sales, phones or general products, I handled all returns, shipping, repairs, customer issues, conference calls, stocked store, updated planograms when neccesary and still assisted sales personnel when needed. I never obtained the title of Store Manager although I did the job, I was never compensated for the managerial tasks I had undertaken. As a matter of fact, my pay rate while I was selling contracts was approx. $13.30/hr, that's Minimum wage (7.40)+Commission. While I took on "acting Store Manager" my pay decreased to my base pay of 7.40/hr due to being unable to be out on the floor with customers. I did this for about a month, and asked my District Manager when the new Store Manager was going to be hired and manage the store so I could continue my training. I was told it could be three more months before someone took over. Within the week I asked for a demotion back to a sales only position and was denied. If I had been  more... a single guy with no kids I may have just hung in there, but I was single and have sole custody of my two children who were 4 and 6 at the time and could not afford to work and pay day care off a purely minimum wage job, not only i was at my store literally from open to close (9am-9pm) daily. I eventually could not afford to drive to work anymore and was fired. I really enjoyed this job and still would like to work there, I have nothing against the company whatsoever and would rate them higher had the District Manager been more serious about his job and cared more for the company than to let good employees go. I am happy and proud to say I worked there at one time.  less
Pros
great environment, good commission rates, amazing products and companies to sell for.
Cons
very poor dm managing, and no good backup plan for when employees bail on co-workers and company.
Was this review helpful?YesNo1
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
The age old saying, "Never again".
Senior Store Manager (Former Employee) –  Richmond, VAMay 5, 2013
I was at RadioShack for just shy of 10 years. During that time I went from being excited to finally be working to dreading seeing the store. When I started I was just a lowly sales associate. My manager saw that I was able to get results. I was promoted to store manager within a year. My first store was pretty nice. Good neighborhood, decent staff, and a bump in pay. But the hours got LONG. I nearly double the number of hours I was working. This was not a good thing for the wife.

I was lucky to have been promoted when I was. At that time the company had a deal that new managers were given a "tenure raise" every year for the first five years. When the last raise came I was in my fifth year as a manager. I got all five raises. Then the company offered another raise that they called "merit pay". This was based on all the activity you personally did outside your store for the district. But your store also had to be producing results. My store was getting the numbers and I was out helping other managers and associates every other week. I earned the merit pay increases both year that was around.

But then pay plans changed. And they changed for the worse. THis became an annual event. From the time I had earned the highest I had till I left the company I had lost a substantial amount of income. I would not have been able to afford another round of pay decreases.

The company also shifted into a different mind set. This change began long before the pay plans began to go downhill. The CEO had once delivered a speech that "...before a company can become the best place to shop it has
  more... to become the best place to work." This initiative died a quick and silent death. After this message was delivered you never heard a peep about "Best company to work for" ever again.

Before I left the company tried bringing in Julian Day, the famed "turn-around king" who rescued K-Mart. He tried. He left. He could not get the company to recover from all that had happened in the previous years.

I knew that it was time to go. So I found another job to land into and left. When I did leave the amount of tenure in the distract was severely lower compared to when I was first promoted to manager. When I was a new store manager there were a lot more 'senior managers' than there were new managers. By the time I left we were meeting new managers every month at the monthly manager meetings. Loyalty counted for nothing it seemed.

I gave the "Compensation and Benefits" 3 stars only because they once had a nice pay plan.
  less
Pros
good discounts on batteries.
Cons
the mentality of "what have you done for me today."
Was this review helpful?Yes1No
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
long hours at low pay, demanding upper management, enjoyable crew and teams, teaches good customer service skills, good for experience.
Store Manager (Former Employee) –  Suffolk, VAAugust 7, 2015
A typical day consisted of selling items and having conversation with customers about how to use the items and what us that was in the store that will compliment it. Review of associate progress and helping them break their barriers. Maintain store appearances. Review contracts and file away. Writing e-mails and communicating with district/regional. Setting daily goals for store associates and filling everyone in on the hot items. Handling customer complaints and satisfaction in store. Budget store expenses and review profit & loss statements. Order merchandise for the store. Complete inventory of stores in district.

I learned how to sale, handle customer issues, encourage team members through positive motivation, and manage a store in day to day business.

Management often times felt like they were playing games and not very forth coming. Often times I believe my district manager was trying to shield the store members from disaster that was happening above our heads and I somewhat feel thankful for that. In the end Radioshack has bankrupt itself with risky upper management and a bad sales model. There was a constant churn of management from District and up. My district manager kept hold for 4 years before moving on and in that time he taught me much and had an overall positive influence in store business.

Coworkers were the life of the business and as such we all kept a tight arm around each other especially when emergencies struck. Teams started falling apart as associate and manager pay began to decrease.

Hardest part of the job was handling overly emotional customers
  more... when I was the only one at the store.

Most enjoyable part were the great customers that you would talk to on a regular basis and help time and time again. Their trust was invaluable and the conversations would give you a second wind on a long day.
  less
Pros
Contests and prize incentives. Team atmosphere in district.
Cons
Long hours for low pay, difficulty maintaining a healthy family life as store manager, management wants high sales but items lost demand and devalued, Sometimes working all day solo, robbed at gunpoint, controlling theft means lots of police reports
Was this review helpful?Yes1No
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Probably the worst experience of my life.
Assistant Manager, Interrim Manager (Former Employee) –  Eldersburg, MDApril 30, 2014
During my three years with Radio Shack, our district went through 7 different district managers, each one wanting to completely overhaul and change everything just for the sake of changing something. To add to the stress of the lack of managerial stability, I was personally shuffled around to 6 different retail stores due to a lack of replacement managers being hired to replace the 8-10 managers who were either terminated or quit during that period.

At one point I was put in charge of a store which only had two part-time employees working at it, and I was forced to either work all day every day, or have the location closed down for parts of the day and lose my job. This routine went on for several weeks. I was, of course, paid overtime, which earned me a stern talking-to from our district manager who was requiring every store, as part of the changes he made, to completely cut overtime for everyone except for store managers which were paid salary rather than hourly. I of course was ACTING store manager, and thus not salary, but the job requirements were the same.

Upon being relieved of my position at that particular store, I returned to my home store, only to find out that the existing manager had hired an assistant manager to completely replace me, which had caused me to not have a position with that store anymore, and sparked a time in my employment lasting about a year where I was without a stable position at any store.

Upon complaint, I was placed in what was widely considered in the district to be the worst store, due to an extreme lack of customer traffic in a job that
  more... is heavily commission-based.

After having been injured on the job, my store manager at the time had gotten "tired of having to deal with doctors notes" and informed me that I would not be scheduled at all until I could return to work without any limitations. Two weeks after this I got a letter from the existing district manager stating that I had "no-call no-showed" for two weeks straight and due to a complaint of this from my manager I was being asked to come back to work with no restrictions or find a new job.

Due to my injury, I chose the latter option, finished out my physical therapy, and I have not looked back since.
  less
Pros
commission during the holiday season
Cons
awful management, zero job security, low pay, next to no viable advancement options
Was this review helpful?Yes1No
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
fun environment to work in as it was the PEOPLE that made the difference!
Manager (Former Employee) –  Hutchinson, KSJuly 20, 2015
Show up early, update planner, check sales from the day before, check our up against sales and assign goals for those working that day, check company memos, check email, load cash in drawer, make sure registers are working, walk through the store and look for anomalies, follow up with previous days tasks and make sure all are done. Now, open the store for the customers. Sell what we can and the rest of the day play tech support. Help customers with what they need and offer our deals to them as well. Attempt to take a lunch break if we aren't busy so we don't have to leave the one other person vulnerable in the store. Usually an afternoon conference call (put the phone on mute and listen as best you can with customers in the store trying to talk to you). Assign tasks for the evening to the associates that will be closing the store. Try to leave at 6 when the schedule says but something will keep me there. Phone call, customer, DM, play catch up on paperwork from a vacation or day off, typing up employee reviews are just a few things that would keep me from going home on time.
Don't get me wrong, I LOVED working for RadioShack! There were alot of things to do and I think we as Managers needed alot more help to run the store the best we could. Sure, I could spend the day entirely in the backroom doing all the reviews and paperwork and finding things that needed to be done. But, on the Salesfloor there was a sales associate that was getting bombarded with customers left and right and needed alot of help to do the job correctly so that each customer would receive stellar
  more... customer service. It was imperative to me to make sure each person had a good experience in my store. The hardest part of this job was seeing the company change things before they would give their ideas a chance to work. Also, seeing our advertisements go away and watching the stores close.  less
Pros
High tech Gadgetry!!, Fun smart people to talk to on a regular basis!
Cons
pay was not enough for all that was truly expected of us, closed my store and left 2 open in a town an hour away!
Was this review helpful?YesNo
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
I was thankful for a job but I need room for advancement with higher pay
Phone sales, assist customers, sell an average (Current Employee) –  Redlands, CAAugust 15, 2013
I was very thankful for this company to hire me, but i do look to move up and make more money when I start working for a company. I feel that there is a stalemate once you become assistant manager. I also seen assistant managers pushed aside for a manager from an outside company, and I never understood that, but it happens with Radioshack a lot. I started off as a bottom tear employee making min. wage and working 18hours a week. I did well with sales and proved I can be a leader and I was placed in a Manager in training program (MIT) but that program was later removed. I emailed a top boss for Radioshack and asked if I could switch from Radioshack to Target Mobile. I was approved and asked to cover the Victor-ville store. I did very well at that store so I was promoted to a Managers position in Diamond Bar inside of the Target, (Radioshack and Target had started a business called Bulls-eye Mobile), that side of Radioshack was not doing well and Radioshack decided to pull out and I was offered a severance package. I did not accept and my wife and I were moving to Oregon, and in order for me to stay with the company I had to take a demotion and become an assistant manager again, I did this as it was better than not holding a job. I worked in Oregon for a year and was never looked at to be promoted even though I was previously a manager. After our one year lease we moved back to California and I almost had to do a "voluntary quit' because there were no openings in California. Two days before I moved I received a call from the District Manager in the Inland Empire and was told that  more... there is a position as an assistant manager open. I took the job only to now find out that they are not going to have any assistant manager positions unless it is a top store. I am now looking for a new job, I am a very hard worker and do my job everyday. I am a father of two and a husband as I mentioned earlier. I am looking for advancement and I have only back tracked in this company. I am having to prove myself over and over again with this company and I can't keep doing this if I am going to have a future.  less
Pros
great job for keeping up with technology
Cons
difficult to move up in the company and not much compensation when you do move up
Was this review helpful?Yes1No
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
It could have been worse
Assistant Manager/Store Manager in Training (Current Employee) –  Muncie, INMarch 10, 2014
On a typical day I will come in, get the cash drawer and daily paperwork in order, and ensure the store is in a condition to open up. Afterwards I go through the routine order of items that must be completed in the morning and throughout the day (Check email, sales metrics, appointments, company memos, etc.).

Then you begin helping customers as they come and hope to find an opening in which you can offer them another service. Unfortunately, sales plans can only be met by selling cell-phones and their services in a RadioShack store. The company also provides and eye opening look into the corporate retail industry and the unfortunate qualities that plague the system.

Many sales associates and managers are tempted to cheat and break policies in manners that show huge sales growth. The methods used, however, hurt the company overall with massive charge backs or by destroying customer relationships with the company. Unfortunately, it is rather often that those with questionable ethics get promoted through the ranks rather quickly.

There are bright sides to the job. There are many "regulars" that my store has that really make the job fun. Then there are instances when you are able to help a customer solve an issue and you can tell you really lifted a weight off of their stress level.

My coworkers are hit and miss in reliability to either perform their job or do their share of the work. Most days spent are rather laid back and slow, so it's easy to fall into a boredom slump. A few part time employees should have been cut long before they finally were, while a couple left for other
  more... employment too soon.  less
Pros
easy to learn, difficult to master (ethically). opportunity to learn the retail and wireless industry
Cons
pushy sales, failing brand, bad upper management style
Was this review helpful?Yes1No
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
A Company Sliding Towards Skid Row.....
Assistant Manager (Current Employee) –  Shaker Heights, OHAugust 23, 2012
Radio Shack Is A Company Now Putting All Of Their Money In Wireless Since That Honestly Is What's Keeping Them In Business Right Now. The Higher Ups In This Company Are Obviously Out of Touch With Reality On How Their Pricing Tiers Are And How They Treat Their Employees. One Of The Hardest Aspects Of The Job For Me Was Dealing With Irate Customers Who Had Issues With Their Cell Phones, And Those Older Customers Who Couldn't Wrap Their Head Around The Fact That Radio Shack Is Different Than It Was In The 1960's, 70's, and 80's As Far As What They Sell And How Much They Sell It For. They Constantly Change The Way They Things Every 2-3 Months And Are Huge Into Micro Managing Things. They Also Give You An Insane Amount Of Tasks While Cutting The Hours At The Same Time To The Point Where You Start To Question What's More Important Between Helping The Customers Of Hearing Somebody Scream About A Count Not Getting Done Because You're The Only One Working In The Store For The First 3-4 Hours It's Open. The Only Thing Good Was Having The Possibility To Control How Much Money You Could Make Depending On How Many Phones And Other Wireless Accessories You Could Sell And With Warranties On Many Items In The Store.....Notice How I Said That In Past Tense? Right! Because Starting In July Radio Shack Lower Their Phone Commissions From $30-45 Per Cell Phone You Sell To $12-16 Per Cell Phone Along With Completely Getting Rid Of Our Commissions On Warranties. They Replaced It With What They Call "Team Incentive Pay" Where You, Your Manager, And All Your Co-Workers Have To Be At Certain Percentages  more... To Get The Pay Which Almost Never Happens. If You Can Get Past All Of What I've Said, Just Remember That Your Possible Success With This Company Will Depend On Your Location, And Your Manager. If One Or Especially If Both Those Things Are Questionable.....So Will Your Money.  less
Pros
possible phone commission
Cons
everything i said in the review along with low pay, low hours
Was this review helpful?YesNo
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Radio Shack is a great stepping stone for anyone trying to get into retail management
Acting Manager (Current Employee) –  Mentor, OHJanuary 16, 2015
The company is falling on some hard times right now, and some serious reconfiguration. A lot of changes are starting with mid level management, and as such its a bit chaotic right now on the lower level side of said management, but still it's a company that has a great atmosphere and tries to have fun and keep a uplifting spirit. I would say its a great way to get your feet wet in management.

I learned quite a bit here, everyday has a new obstacle, and everyday there's something else to overcome. All these challenges, although tough, have giving me the tools of knowledge that I can use in any field I choose to pursue. One of the biggest things I have learnt here was about people, not just customers, but fellow coworkers. I have watched them grow, move on to new jobs, or stick with it here and continue to move on in the company in other stores.

The hardest part of this job is the fact of the unknown, and the constant shift of focus. I love working for Radio Shack, but somedays It's really tough watching the web of management fall apart over a week, or watching your mentors laid off, or leave one by one. So the hardest part of this job is just staying hopeful, for myself, and my employees.

On the flipside when we have, boy do we have fun. Everyone I work with is interesting, goofy, and are never short of a few jokes that put a smile on my face. We make fun contests, competitions, and always find a way to cheer each other up. The people who you work for, or with are the best part of this job, not the money, not the pitiful commission, not the benefits, it's the people, and not
  more... just the employees, the customers are a blast too. We always try to turn our customers visits into fun, funny, and valuable experiences, and we've made some seriously committed, and loyal customers in the past year that won't work with anyone but our store.  less
Pros
the people, and customers
Cons
low commission, chaotic management, lack of communication.
Was this review helpful?Yes1No
Job Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Job Culture
Somewhat enjoyable company with poor reputation among customers
Store Manager (Former Employee) –  Carrollton, TXMarch 31, 2015
Upper management made some poor decisions in the past 2 years or so that caused many of the stores to be forced to close. Other than that the experience was good. Had a good relationship at my store with my employees and customers.
A typical day at work would start with myself going over the previous day's sales, double checking any returns/exchanges, filing said paperwork, opening the store, taking care of any customers (helping them find items, answering any questions they had about the product, and checking them out at the cash register) or if there were no customers in the store, I would fill any empty pegs with the corresponding items from the back-stock, train new employees, process cash deposit and take it to the bank, have a conference call, and when it came time to close we would vacuum the sales floor, sweep the stockroom, empty the trashcans, wipe down counters, count the money in the registers and then lock up the store.
In my time at Radioshack I learned a lot about people. Some people come in with a bad attitude and it was my job to help them find what they came in for and try to help repair the bad image they associate our store with. When I took over my store, this happened often. The previous manager was extremely rude to customers and associates in front of customers, so many of our local customers would stay away from our store. I had to repair that image and I honestly enjoyed showing our customers that I was not the same type of person as the old manager.
The hardest part of the job was probably getting useful information from the corporate office.
  more... Specifically when they would announce anything to the press before they would announce it to the employees. We would have customers come in asking when our store was closing before we ever heard anything about it from the corporate office ourselves.
My favorite part of the job was definitely the people I met during my near 5 year stay with Radioshack. I met some great customers and also great friends and roommates through working with them at Radioshack.
  less
Pros
People (customers and coworkers)
Cons
Short breaks, high hours/low pay (toward the end of my stay)
Was this review helpful?YesNo

Overall rating

3.5
Based on 3,216 reviews
5 stars
4 stars
3 stars
2 stars
1 star

Ratings by category

Work/Life Balance
Compensation/Benefits
Job Security/Advancement
Management
Culture