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6,844 reviews

U.S. Air Force Employer Reviews

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Responsibility and Honor
Mission Director (Former Employee), San Antonio, TXFebruary 19, 2015
A typical day at work involved: Honor, Responsibility, Accountability, Customer Service, Respect, Dedication, Duty, Computer Software/Hardware, Training, Scheduling, Briefing, Reports, Physical Training, and General Labor.

There is no way for me to tell someone how much I learned from the military. They taught me how to be a better man. I would recommend it to anyone and everyone. If you allow them they can teach you everything you need to know to start your life off correctly. The things you will learn in the military will be carried with you the rest of your life.

Management is the best there is.

Co-workers have your life in their hands, and you have theirs in yours. There is not a stronger bond to be had. Brothers!

The hardest part of the job was the transition. When your life is being changed inside and out it can become stressful.

I loved everything about the job. I served six years in the military before I retired from it. I will carry it with me always.
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U.S. Air Force
Conventional Maintenance Crew Chief (Current Employee), Nellis AFB, NVFebruary 19, 2015
I worked for the US government for 6 years. Working there was very stressful and the work load was to much for the amount of people working. I did my duty and now im looking for a job.
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Professional workplace
Medical Technician Journeyman (Current Employee), Keesler AFB MSFebruary 19, 2015
Pros: benefits and steady pay.
Cons: short or no breaks and long hours.
Worked 13 to 14 hour days, caring for 4 to 5 patients in a ward setting. Learned life saving skills, human relations skills, and leadership/follower skills.

The hardest part of the job was losing a patient to a terminal disease.

The best part of the job was saving a life and improving a patients health.
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great experience
Medical records/ front desk clerk (Former Employee), Andrews AFB, MDFebruary 19, 2015
Typical work day is checking in patients and answering phones, filing medical records and paperwork and also scheduling and canceling medical appointments.
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Great job dealing with motivated people
Senior-Level Manager (Current Employee), Keesler AFB, MSFebruary 19, 2015
Day starts 0645 and usually ends around 1700 daily. Normal day consists of multiple levels of problem solving, personnel interactions and mentoring.
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US Air FORCE
Prior Active Duty Service Member (Former Employee), NCFebruary 19, 2015
Pros: always somthing to learn
Cons: can become dangerious but it is known
A great organization to be apart of to learn a trade, responsibility, and the importance of doing everything to the best of your abilities.
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The Air Force was awesome!
Superintendent, Human Resources (Former Employee), Marine Corps Base Quantico, VAFebruary 18, 2015
I loved being in the Air Force and I really miss it. It was nice working with people of different cultures and living and working in different states and countries. I had the best co-workers and the hardest part of my job was having to leave it.
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The best job I ever had
Airman First Class (Former Employee), Goodfellow AFBFebruary 18, 2015
Pros: healthcare, meals, lodging, equal footing with everyone
Cons: work hours subject to change, under constant scrutiny
The military experience is one that I will never again experience anywhere else. Most would tell you that the military is not for everyone, and they'd be correct. On top of physical and academic requirements, certain attitude and commitment is needed just to make the cut; to live for the team and the mission, and to die if needed.

Basic training is just the beginning, and the real work only starts after you finish that and technical training. A typical day at work would include physical training during the odd hours of the morning (or after work), and then going to the job you trained for. The people you work with are also the people you trained with, so finding friends is not a problem.

The most difficult part of the job is being on-call 24-7. Unless you were on leave, you had to be on-site within 24-hours to provide your services. Aside from that, the challenge and the camaraderie more than made up for any cons the job had.
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Dynamic work environment
Resource Advisor (Current Employee), Vandenberg AFB, CAFebruary 18, 2015
Our unit spans the globe with detachments in Hawaii, Kwajalein, Guam, and Diego Garcia. Our days are never dull. We also work intimately with the units at Schreiver AFB to maintain connectivity in space. My co-workers enjoy the uniqueness of our unit, and we work very well as a team. Management is very supportive and always represents us as a solid component of the space team.

The hardest part of my job is the time zone issues with our detachments. Beyond that, I enjoy being a sound steward of taxpayer dollars.
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Very busy with jets
Fuels Distribution Operator (Former Employee), Mcguire AFB NJFebruary 18, 2015
Pros: good pay good benefits
Cons: miss family, managers treat u like dirt.
go in to work in the morning go down and do checkpoint on all of our trucks make sure theyre all inspected properly running fine. After thats done on a normal day wed have training to do or something. So we do that until a plane calls in requesting fuel so then we drive out fueling up that aircraft in a timely and professional manner, not even including all the paperwork u had to do with it. We all would just keep taking fuel runs out to jets helicopters planes hummers, u name it, whatever needed fuel ive refueled it. then id go to pt after work and go home.
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Top notch experience
Aircraft Engine Mechanic/ (Current Employee), ColoradoFebruary 18, 2015
Fulfilled support section Non-Commissioned Officer in Charged position; maintained 6K tools valued at $2.1M
Managed 180 hazmat items; $10K of chemicals safely stored/maintained
I supervised & coordinated aircraft maintenance during isochronal/routine inspections on 12 C-130H3 aircrafts valued at $444 Million
I was routinely tasked with the inspection of both organizational and intermediate level maintenance. This includes: Inspecting, maintaining, repairing, aligning, troubleshooting, and testing T-56 engines, 54H60-117 propellers, and auxiliary power units
Removes/replaces engine and propeller accessories; tests components using bench mock-ups & test equipment
Documented and maintained aircraft forms, status, and timely/accurate computer based historical documentation for tracking analysis/trends
Training Manager for over 45 maintainers, which include the different personnel from Active Duty, Reservist, and Air Force Reserve Technicians
My supervisory duties require me to plan the work assignment of day to day tasks in which I am the lead technician; organizing personnel, tools, diagnostic equipment and maintenance documentation.
My duties also require that I inspect, certify, and approve the completed maintenance actions of other propulsion maintainers; ensuring quality is of the highest standard I am also tasked with the disassembly and assembly of engines and propellers adhering to prescribed procedures and regulations.
I interpret and implement directives and publications pertaining to maintenance functions, including environmental and safety regulations and good practices. I determine resource requirements, including facilities, equipment, and supplies that are needed in support of aerospace maintenance.
I am called upon to advise senior staff on maintenance decisions, perform troubleshooting, and determines repair procedures on aircraft engines.
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enjoyable so far
Explosive Ordnance Disposal Team Member (Current Employee), Andrews Air Force BaseFebruary 18, 2015
I haven't been a part of the air force very long, but so far I must say that I'm impressed and enjoying the new atmosphere as a member of the Air Force Reserve.
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All factions of transportation and maintenance
NCOIC Special Vehicle Maintenance (Former Employee), World WideFebruary 18, 2015
Pros: training
Cons: combat
As with any military organization, one is exposed to many cultures involving personnel and the countries one lives in... great experience. You are developing experience that will be beneficial to any community once you transition to civilian life.
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Great opportunity
In-flight Refueler Journeyman (Former Employee), Ricetown, NJFebruary 17, 2015
Serving in the United States Air Force was a great opportunity. The best part of my job as an in-flight refueler was the overall mission of the kc-10 aircraft. The Kc-10 was used to fly cargo worldwide, and refuel coalition aircrafts, while carrying maintenance and command personnel.
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Air Force
Cardiopulmonary Technician/Respiratory Therapist (Former Employee), Eglin AFB, FLFebruary 17, 2015
A typical day would include covering emergency rooms, intensive care units, pulmonary and/or cardiology, being in charge of pulmonary, etc.
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learning experience
Warehouse Facilities Specialist (Former Employee), Warner Robins, GAFebruary 17, 2015
i was only 18 years old when I left home. I enjoyed my time at my duty base. Interesting people from all over the world. I would sign up again
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Great Opportunity, Hard Work.
Cargo Handling Specialist (Former Employee), Montgomery AL, Tokyo Japan, Jacksonville ARFebruary 17, 2015
Pros: benefits, vacation, pay, advancement
Cons: separated from loved ones, intense environment
Working for the U.S. Military, whatever branch you choose, is a hard decision. You are often separated from your loved ones, and there are times that you may not see them for years. Supervisors and Upper Management will push you to promote even if you are comfortable at the level you are at. There's no such thing as 'getting comfortable.' Once you are in, however, its hard to deny the benefits. You have free health care, dental care, and you pay a low rate for life insurance. Housing is supplied on base, and when you meet the qualifications, you can move off base with extra pay. You are given 30 days a year for vacation, and maternity leave when needed.
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Amazing overall experience. Yes, I'd do it again.
Avionics Systems Specialist (Former Employee), Joint Base Lewis-McChord WAFebruary 17, 2015
Pros: fruits of your labor are easily seen, high-valued technical equipment, unique opportunities and places not seen anywhere else
Cons: long hours, austere environments, safety not always guaranteed
A typical day would start with a quick employee meeting. Priorities would be reviewed and after the meeting ended, if I happened to be the highest ranking member, I would break up the team into smaller groups and assign tasks. These tasks ranged from periodic inspections, initial training/retraining, troubleshooting aircraft components, processing files/paperwork, evaluating employees for annual performance reports, and performing the non-specialty related duties of a Non-Commissioned Officer.

The Air Force provided me with a structured learning environment. With each rank came a new promotion. With each promotion came more responsibility and a higher expectation of specific avionic systems knowledge. I thrived in this environment and appreciated being connected to a large team working together so effectively.

The Air Force is in some ways incredibly diverse. The people you work with can be from all different walks of life. The military though, is still a lifestyle; it can be thought of as more than just a job. Despite so much diversity, my co-workers and I always had something in common, a similar lifestyle. Finding simple similarities and using those to strengthen my relationships with my co-workers is something the Air Force taught me.

The hardest part of my job had to be deploying to unique environments and performing my duties under extremely stressful conditions. Twelve-hour shifts, six days a week and often being called in on your one day off for months at a time can take it's toll on a person. Coupled with harsh weather conditions, like grueling 120+ degree days and – more... freezing nights while working on sensitive aircraft components and having significantly less resources available than in domestic locations made deployments the hardest part of working for the Air Force.

One of my most enjoyable experiences in the Air Force had to be when I was selected for a special team supporting the National Science Foundation. There, I had the opportunity to visit two very unique places, New Zealand and Antarctica. Truly unforgettable experiences, just like serving in the military. – less
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A stable and challenging job
Software Engineer (Current Employee), Midwest City, OKFebruary 17, 2015
My group is an excellent bunch of computer scientists and software engineers. Using the Agile scrum methodology, we work together as a very cohesive unit. Every 2 weeks, we would complete a mini release and demo our product to our customer which happens to be the Air Force. The work is challenging and fun. The only thing that I want to see improved is in advancement. There is not much room to grow.
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Great Military branch to work for
Security Forces (Current Employee), Clovis, NMFebruary 17, 2015
I have gained more knowledge than I could have imagined while serving in the Air Force. I have became a great leader and an even harder worker.

About U.S. Air Force

The mission of the United States Air Force is to fly, fight and win...in air, space and cyberspace. To achieve that mission, the – Read more