U.S. Army

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U.S. Army Employee Reviews

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Wow, talk about a career!
Healthcare Specialist (Former Employee) –  TerraMay 16, 2013
Typical days at work involve endless formations, waiting hours for commanders to arrive. Standing in lines for long periods of time while maintaining silence. Walking long distances while maintaining silence. Driving long distances while maintaining silence. Sitting long periods of time while maintaining silence. On the medical side you will find yourself knee deep in blood of your friends, animals, innocents, and manikins. Your hands will sometimes take days to wash clean, and you will be forced to clean your boots every day, and they just smell worse and worse from always being wet. In your downtime you will treat soldiers who didn't want to use their own socks for happy time, so they use their fellow team members socks, but they quickly realize their neighbor had a form of foot rot, and its now become their joysticks problem. If there is a cactus somewhere, somebody will find it. You will spend hours inspecting brown eyes, watching people urinate into cups, and listening to people complain about how bad THEIR day has been. You will hear people complain about how they have to get a vaccine, or how they are allergic to... whatever magic is in the tube. Ive even had people tell me they are allergic to mercury, uranium, and sarin... No kidding so is everyone else...

Tens of millions will be spent to train you, and employers typically won't actually value any of the skills you have learned. Every interview you will receive a generic, 'Thanks for your service' followed by the *don't hire this guy, smile at him and thank him for his time, he might be crazy* handshake. The majority
  more... of skills you learn will not transfer well over to civilian life, and you quickly realize working as a whopper flopper could have advanced you much further in the 4,6,10+ years you spent serving a nation that only values its ability to consume.

Co-workers are generally those who were unable to achieve whopper flopper greatness, and were unable to make it to college. On the medical side, people are generally intelligent to an extent... but quickly crack under any real pressure. Your supervisors will constantly look to you for a diagnosis and solution to any problems, using the slick 'I know whats wrong, but lets see what you think' style of covering up their ignorance. You will constantly have to train the FNGs, because of the stress of a militia with an increasing level of turn over means people graduate classes they don't remember attending.

Management is a story. I cant even tell the story, this box doesn't support a dissertation on failure. Top level generals are selected using the scientific good-ol-boy method. Trickle down leadership economics is then used to fill the officer ranks, and generally the higher enlisted ranks. Eventually you will find the lowest level leaders achieved the highest levels of leadership, and the rewards can be amazing. Anything from your supervisor writing about how great he is for creating such an outstanding leader, to a coin of no value that people yank from your pocket and throw on to bars forcing you to buy their beers because they bought their coins on ebay.

The most enjoyable part of my job was every time I received the results of my STD test, and understood I was clean. Being covered in so many bodily fluids, dirt, etc and constantly getting torn up no matter what your doing because your one of the only soldiers who understands what the evil four letter word WORK means really puts you at risk. Having to hear about who did who where and why, and then following the trail of high 5s back to the original pit was terrifying... you always think to yourself... If I had any free time, I could have been there.

The least enjoyable part of the job was the vegetarian omelet. Not the new one they made for these go happy go lucky no violence stress card children... The original one for adults. When that thing first came out, I remember crying for days. After my first bite I actually saw part of my soul descending to the first circle, I instantly lost 20lbs due to depression, and began to have horrible nightmares. Ultimately it led to my separation from service. A good medic always eats last, and that means they have to be the biggest strongest of the all, because they have to stomach that beast of entree.
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Pros
stress was provided free of charge
Cons
i only ever got one white rhaspberry chocolate chip cookie ever
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Upon Request
Community Life Non-Commissioned Officer (Current Employee) –  Fort Hood, TXOctober 21, 2014
PROS
1.Job Security. When you join the Army you are put in a certain job, if you tested well you are put into the job you wanted according to availability. Then you go through Basic Training and upon passing this you continue on to Advanced Individual Training (AIT). Upon completion of these two courses you become qualified for that job you were given. The job will be yours, there will be no lay-offs. Note: Only after completion of both Basic and AIT is the job yours. If failure of one or both of these training courses is a result, then you may lose your job and you would most likely be assigned with a less than desirable job. Transferring to another job is possible based on various and widely ranged circumstances. My fiance transferred to a different job just recently, and I can transfer to another job if I'm willing to give up the enlistment bonuses I was given. If I don't want to give up my bonus, I can pick another job when I enlist in a few years. There are options.
2.Income annually adjusted for inflation. Based on inflation we get a pay raise every year.
3.Dependable Retirement Benefits. It's not a question mark.
4.Learn and train in new skills. The Army prides on the constant and consistent learning of its soldiers. It's definitely a pride of mine, the Army assists me in my goal to always keep learning.
5.Stay in shape and Stay Healthy... and get paid doing it! It's a joke in the army, but a reality also, that we get paid for doing something we would do habitually even if we weren't in the Army.
6.Gain lasting friendship bonds. The Army is its own community and as a
  more... community it has its own experiences. It's a great thing to know when you can count on a buddy with your life.
7.Learn more about yourself. With the extreme training environments the Army puts you through you tend to learn a lot more about yourself than you would working at your local movie store or internship etc. The Army places its soldiers through extreme training so that the soldier will be ready for anything and thus more likely to come home unscathed. I learned more about myself and my abilities in six months of Army Training than I have in 10 years of my life.
8.Skip out on the Routine Life. Army Life is definitely different. Training is constantly changing, something different always needs to be done or learned. It's great for people who don't like to stand idle.
9.Take a break from school/work. With the choice of joining the military comes the outcome of your decision- if you're Active Army you have the life of a soldier on a base and possibly a deployment in the future, if you're Army Reserve you will have a deployment on your hands and if it's a break from school or work you want, then more power to ya, you'll get it. (side comment: debt free!)
10.Educational benefits. The Army promotes Learning. It may take you out of school or work for a year or two, but learning and becoming a better person is always #1 so that you can do your job to its utmost effectiveness. So take a break from school or work and work as a medic or intel analyst for the Army, and let the Army help you expand your mind and your life.
11.Full-Time Pride in the job that you do. One of the reasons why some join the Army, or just military in general, is because they are not interested in working in corporate offices. To them, and me, the 9-5 shift working in cubicles represents an empty, hollow, and meaningless way to live. By joining the Army we gain the meaning and the knowledge that we are serving our Country in a way that we can be proud of.

CONS
1.If the Army's not for you, you'll hate it. Think carefully before you join, do your research. You always have time. The Army's maximum enlistment age is 42. Don't rush your decision.
2.Separation. My fiance is also in the Army and he's already been to Iraq and back. I had to endure the separation of that time and it's no small thing to ignore. Separation from your loved ones, whether you are in the military or you're a family member, is one of the aspects of military life that can make or break a person.
3.Political Party of the President. No matter what, you must be willing to follow the orders of the current President, no matter the political affiliation.
4.Early wake-up
5.Less predictable and controllable schedule
6.Army Food, depending on where you're stationed, will be either enjoyable or edible. Endure it and drive on.
7. From day one: no whining, no complaining and NO EXCUSES.
8.Possible injury or death. The risk is real, think before you act.
9.At times non-military personnel will be ignorant as to what you do in the Army and will act out against you with some sort of self-righteous display. Not everyone supports us, and every soldier needs to deal with that. Everyone is entitled to their opinions.
10.A lot of running. Deal with it soldier and drive on.
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Pros
stated below
Cons
stated below
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Hard working, productive, often fun, along with high-stress environments
Automated Logistical Specialist (Former Employee) –  Fort Carson, COMarch 25, 2014
There is no typical day while in the Army, but that does not mean that there is nothing going on. The following of which i am about to mention can happen in any particular order. There will always be physical education, which usually takes place at 6:30 in the morning, but many times in the afternoon instead. Fifteen minutes before 8:00 am is when the team and i, nine at the most, would be at work to turn on the computers, receive statuses, via satellite communication, from the warehouse on parts ordered, and then print out all other reports, which were four.

On Fort Carson, i would drive our materials hauling PLS to the warehouse daily to pick up ordered parts, transport them back to our motorpool to sort them out, and mark the items with the company they belong to and the destination within the company. The items order numbers would then be input into the database followed by the customers picking them up or by me transporting them to their respective unit destinations. The parts received would vary depending if i was in Fort Carson or in Iraq. Constant ordering and transportation of parts took place because of the constant combat missions.

Team leaders constantly came in to keep track of what vehicles are in the computer system and how much damage each vehicle has. All of the eight companies had a combined total each of eighty vehicles, trailers, and generators in the system. This is massive amounts of data input and record keeping. It was not uncommon to add and delete hundreds of lines of data over the course of a day in regards to ordering parts and closing out work
  more... orders while inputting new data such as serial and model numbers for vehicles. Although inventorying was done once every two weeks while being stationed in Fort Carson, our home base, it was done everyday during free time while in Iraq. 13 to 15 months for each of my Army tours, which i have three of and two while in the Marine Corps. Midway through the day, statuses would have to be received again from the warehouse and i would have to send them reports showing the statuses we received. Those same reports would be viewed in person by my chief or it would be sent to him. At the end of the day, the same reports would be sent out and others received in order to make sure sure that things run smoothly within the Army supply chain as a whole.

To work at such a record pace, and we did set records during the Army's version of competitive practices in Southern Arizona, we, with the exception of non-caring and untrustworthy non-commissioned officer, trusted each other both on and off the battlefield. We were friends, brothers and sisters in arms, and not just mere co-workers. Training together the way we did brought out the best of the best in all of us to the pint to where we often didn't need words to communicate in order to get something done. We each knew what to do. During the times where the outside temperature was 140 degrees, of course people will have bad days and stresses will flare up, but we worked through it and stayed together. Whenever one of us would mess up, somebody would be quick to point it out, sometimes rather bluntly, but it would be quickly rectified. These are the type of friends i could count on with my life on or off the job.
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Pros
great teamwork, got things done, good friends, and gained all sorts of work and cultural experiences from many parts of the world.
Cons
stress is a constant friend, went to war and got shot at, incoming mortar rounds while working, and gained a slight physical disability in my back.
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Don't join the Army unless you are doing it with the sole purpose of serving your country.
Senior IT Administrator (Former Employee) –  JBLM WA.March 20, 2013
A typical day at work: hurry up and wait; rush to one location and wait there for sometimes hours for orders. Most of the time depending on your position and rank you are going to be doing something unrelated to your job. If you are a counter intelligence guy for example that is not deployed you will probably be tasked to clean weapons, office work not pertaining to your field, pick up trash etc. I have herd in meeting before, "At formation put out that we'll be releasing them early to get them to do the job faster" when it was never the plan at all.

Management: Most of the management in the army aren't fit for the job at all. Once you make a certain rank you become somewhat of a manager in charge of a few people. A lot of these managers aren't college educated, high school educated and didn't learn managerial skill from anywhere else in life either. A lot of the managers look out for themselves and the good ones are few and far between. It's for the most part a buddy buddy system. If you find a good NCO you will know it and he will be talked about in a good light by you and others for years to come.

What I learned: I learned a lot of things in my time in the Army. I learned how to deal with and manage people from all walks of life (literally). I was able to complete some schooling and learn about different types of weapons, tactical maneuvers, chemicals agents and response, HAZMAT, IT stuff and the list goes on. You can learn some useful things in the army but you have to get the degrees and certificates to get hired when your contract ends. My co- workers like I said where
  more... from all walks of life, you will make some friends; most of them will not bother to stay in contact after you switch duty stations or become a Vet but a few will. Some people you will like and some you wont, some people aren't used to people from different areas or cultural backgrounds so it is a learning experience for all.

Hardest Part of the Job: The actual job is easy it's the people that make it hard. The hardest part about the job is being powerless in almost every situation. You do as your told and common since doesn't exist, if you have a better way you shouldn't give your input just stay quite or it will be looked at as defiance especially if you boss doesn't like you. Senses sessions "used to find out problems in the companies" are held by your supervisors supervisors are really used to weed out complainers and black ball them. Senses sessions are said to be confidential but they really aren't. The last hard part about the job is the Good O'l Boy system.

What I enjoyed most: learning of "new things"; a lot of filler training in the army. I enjoyed a lot of the people I got a chance to be around and work with. I enjoyed not having to worry about a pay check.I enjoyed sometimes not having to do anything at all and getting paid for it. I enjoyed being overseas. I enjoyed the closeness and friendship I had with some of my past friends, we all where away from family and it made us become family. I enjoyed the good sergeants that I had that took the time out to teach me how to be not only a good soldier but a great leader. Most people are young and immature when they sign that contract and they need a person like the few sergeants that I had to take them under their wings and teach them thing about life that would take them a lot longer in life to learn on their own.

I love America, but at the end of the day I wouldn't condone my kid joining.
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Pros
guaranteed check, free gym, no tax when deployed, gi bill, long breaks, lots of no work days
Cons
soldier 24/7 (can get called in any time), possibility of missing your own kid being born, death or loss of limb, horrible bosses
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Incredible balance between Having the Honor to serve our Country and working with some of the most high energy& motivated people
Non Commissioned Officer (Former Employee) –  Ft. Lewis WA.January 18, 2014
As the Operations Non Commissioned Officer in charge I was responsible for the accurate gathering of factual information through questioning, receiving back briefs and reviewing official daily logs, examining all documents every 12 hours for accuracy and ensuring each document was saved and accessible in the secure database, reviewed periodically for determining patterns or trends of enemy activity. Responsible for the security of two Joint security stations through the use of the raid tower fitted with fleer technology for night observation and zoom capabilities, and the use of secure radio communications to all four observation towers and the entry control point: valued at $6+ million in property, 65 U.S servicemen, and 150 Iraqi Army / Police with zero security incidents, loss of personnel or equipment.
Successfully supervised and coordinated with host Nation officials QRF (Quick Reaction Force) for over 60 combat missions with zero loss of friendly forces during high intensity missions during OIF 08-09. Escalation of force was strictly enforced with zero negligent discharges or weapons fired unless there was positive identification of a threat. Ensured detainees were treated with respect, searched, supervised and hydrated upon capture. Conducted tactical site exploitation and ensured proper handling of evidence which led to the conviction of two high value targets in court. Supervised six interpreters and ensured the information that they gathered was briefed and followed up by our interrogators and the Iraqi National police for further investigation. Primary instructor
  more... for M-16/M-4 qualification, raised the qualification rate from 27% to 95%, and qualified 68 out of 72 gunners as expert on the M-240B prior to deployment to Iraq. Tactical proficiency in close quarters combat and urban operations resulted in the flawless employment of B-Troop 5-4 Cav during cordon and search operations of over 100 homes, contraband was seized and one Soldier received a Bronze Star for apprehending an armed suspect when he was clearly a threat to his life.

During an attack on Joint security station 1 Baghdad Iraq, I observed indirect fires inside our perimeter within 100 meters of our Troop Headquarters/1st and 2nd platoons living quarters, I sent my Sr. medic SSG. Neves to the vehicle that had a Soldier down from critical wounds he had incurred during the attack, he was stabilized but later passed away. I immediately alerted the TOC and Soldiers in their Quarters, the First Sergeants driver and gunner to prep the vehicle for medevac of the wounded Soldier, and quickly made my way around the entire JSS for accountability of all personnel. Received a permanent award for actions in combat. (PERMANENT ORDER: 022-004 dated 22 January 2009)
Most Enjoyable: Serving with some of our Country's finest Americans, Training, encouraging, Counseling and Mentoring.
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Pros
the attitude, professionalism, excitement, travel, diversity, equal opportunity, career advancement.
Cons
trying to balance service-sacrifice between country and family.
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Fun and challenging place to work
Human Intelligence Collector (Current Employee) –  Fort Bragg, NCJuly 27, 2015
A normal work day for me in the Army started with physical training, either running or muscle failure exercises. After physical training I would head to my office where we would work on upcoming training exercises, which would usually consist of creating roles for some of the individuals participating in the exercises, create reports that would be used in the excise and if needed help develop the scenario. If there was not an exercise planned we would work on our report writing skills as well as our intelligence gathering skills. This would sometimes be in the form of a class taught by our non-commissioned officers or government contractors on the instillation.

The biggest thing that I learned during my time in the Army was how to work with people with all different personalities and how to adjust to changes quickly. Regularly during our preparation for training exercises the scenarios would change which would mean that we would have to change our reports or the roles that we had created. Being flexible is key when your working with people that are not always in the same office and that had differing ideas of what should or should not be in the exercise. My job as a human intelligence collector also gave me an opportunity to become a better public speaker and become more comfortable talking to not just my direct supervisors but non-commissioned officers and officers from other units that I would not normally talk with on a daily basis. We would have to brief people from outside of our office about our part in the exercise, some of which did may not have a solid understanding
  more... of my job. Being knowledgeable of the responsibilities of my job and how they effected other peoples jobs, gave me a better understanding of my own job.

My leaders changed a few times and with the changes in leaders came changes in personalities and how things would be done. My direct supervisors have always helped me and my co-works adjust to the ever changing environment that is the Army. They would also offer help outside of work. If someone in my family was sick they would always ask how they could help, or if I needed anything. My co-workers were the same way. Everyone looked out for each other. It didn't matter if it was something as easy as helping someone move or as difficult as someone's loved one passing away, we worked together to help each other get through the hard times in life.

The hardest part of the job was advancement. Moving up in the Army is based on your job and a points system. Points were earned through job specific schools, deployments, weapons ranges and physical training test scores. The highest amount of points that could be required is 798 points, which without deployments and multiple job specific schools is very hard to reach. For most of my time here promotion points have been at 798, which made it very difficult to move up in rank. The other hard part about the military is that you miss out on big events in your friend's and family's lives, like weddings, children being born or sometimes seeing loved ones before they pass. I have missed 3 or 4 weddings of real good friends, and seeing my family, due to training exercises.

The best part of my job is getting to talk with people and learning how to read people's body language. Being able to read people's body language and listening to what they are actually saying, instead of thinking about what your going to say back as allowed me to become better at defusing situations where someone was upset. I have learned that sometimes people want to feel like their issues are important even when we don't agree.
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Pros
Healthcare, training, seeing different parts of the country
Cons
Advancement, living where you would like
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Teaches you how to be responsible and be a good leader.
Material Management Supervisor (Former Employee) –  JBLM, WASeptember 5, 2012
IT MEANS YOU LIVE UP TO A HIGHER STANDARD
Many people know what the words Loyalty, Duty, Respect, Selfless Service, Honor, Integrity, and Personal Courage mean. But how often do you see someone actually live up to them? Soldiers learn these values in detail during Basic Combat Training (BCT), from then on they live them every day in everything they do — whether they’re on the job or off. In short, the Seven Core Army Values listed below are what being a Soldier is all about.

LOYALTY

Bear true faith and allegiance to the U.S. Constitution, the Army, your unit and other Soldiers. Bearing true faith and allegiance is a matter of believing in and devoting yourself to something or someone. A loyal Soldier is one who supports the leadership and stands up for fellow Soldiers. By wearing the uniform of the U.S. Army you are expressing your loyalty. And by doing your share, you show your loyalty to your unit.

DUTY

Fulfill your obligations. Doing your duty means more than carrying out your assigned tasks. Duty means being able to accomplish tasks as part of a team. The work of the U.S. Army is a complex combination of missions, tasks and responsibilities — all in constant motion. Our work entails building one assignment onto another. You fulfill your obligations as a part of your unit every time you resist the temptation to take “shortcuts” that might undermine the integrity of the final product.

RESPECT

Treat people as they should be treated. In the Soldier’s Code, we pledge to “treat others with dignity and respect while expecting others to do the same.” Respect is what allows
  more... us to appreciate the best in other people. Respect is trusting that all people have done their jobs and fulfilled their duty. And self-respect is a vital ingredient with the Army value of respect, which results from knowing you have put forth your best effort. The Army is one team and each of us has something to contribute.

SELFLESS SERVICE

Put the welfare of the Nation, the Army and your subordinates before your own. Selfless service is larger than just one person. In serving your country, you are doing your duty loyally without thought of recognition or gain. The basic building block of selfless service is the commitment of each team member to go a little further, endure a little longer, and look a little closer to see how he or she can add to the effort.

HONOR

Live up to Army values. The Nation’s highest military award is The Medal of Honor. This award goes to Soldiers who make honor a matter of daily living — Soldiers who develop the habit of being honorable, and solidify that habit with every value choice they make. Honor is a matter of carrying out, acting, and living the values of respect, duty, loyalty, selfless service, integrity and personal courage in everything you do.

INTEGRITY

Do what’s right, legally and morally. Integrity is a quality you develop by adhering to moral principles. It requires that you do and say nothing that deceives others. As your integrity grows, so does the trust others place in you. The more choices you make based on integrity, the more this highly prized value will affect your relationships with family and friends, and, finally, the fundamental acceptance of yourself.

PERSONAL COURAGE

Face fear, danger or adversity (physical or moral). Personal courage has long been associated with our Army. With physical courage, it is a matter of enduring physical duress and at times risking personal safety. Facing moral fear or adversity may be a long, slow process of continuing forward on the right path, especially if taking those actions is not popular with others. You can build your personal courage by daily standing up for and acting upon the things that you know are honorable.
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Wonderful experience and great life lessons
UNITED STATES ARMY ENGINEER - SPECIALIST - 12W (Former Employee) –  Fort Benning, GAJanuary 21, 2013
-A typical day at work would involve waking up and being in accountability formation 10 minutes prior to when accountability is made at 06:30 A.M. every morning. Physical training (PT) is held from 06:30 A.M. to 07:30 A.M. Following PT, personal hygiene is conducted, breakfast follows after, and duty day will start at 09:00 A.M. At 09:00 A.M. is when tasks are delegated from the squad leader to the squad. Entire inspection is conducted on military vehicles by either a private or a private first class while under the supervision of a specialist, paperwork on the vehicle is reviewed by a specialist and then turned into the squad leader when completed. After this is completed, the duty day will vary from conducting inventories of military gear, cleaning weapons, training, or various classes ranging from cold/hot weather training to terroristic threat prevention.
-In the military, I first learned to instill discipline into my life. Getting up to go to work every day at such early times with little sleep and even when you do not feel well, keeping a calm mind when faced with high level stress situations, being on time at all designated times during the work day, maintaining a professional appearance, obeying all orders and regulations even if no one is there to see you. I learned how to work with various different people from all types of different backgrounds and from different places throughout the world. And most importantly, I learned personal responsibility. You are responsible for yourself and your actions alone.
-My squad leader is whom I would consider my manager and I looked
  more... up to my squad leader. I looked to him as a mentor and attempted to follow and do the things that he did because of how professional and respected he was by every individual in my platoon. I tried to learn as much about life in the military and life outside of the military as I could from him and in the end, after my military service was over and he was no longer considered my boss, I gained a friend whom I consider to be like a father to me.
-My brothers and sisters in arms will always be very important people to me in my life. I was highly respected among my peers for the accomplishments I had achieved in the military and for the motivation that I always tried to put forth. Being in the military and away from families can be a tough situation to deal with so I constantly tried to remain positive and lift everyone's spirits each day.
-The hardest part of my job would have to be the distance that it set between my family and I. Due to the long hours I worked each day, I wasn't able to remain as close to them as I was used to. I eventually was able to get over that feeling and realize that they were always going to be there for me and understood how busy the military kept me.
-The most enjoyable part of the job would have to be the friends that I made through the military and all the people that I had the opportunity to meet. I consider myself to be a people person and I enjoy meeting others from different walks of life and also learning about other peoples cultures.
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Pros
clothing allowance, healthcare, structured, community, travel, training.
Cons
possible deployments, stressful at times.
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High Intensity Environment, Hard Work, Good Benefits
Cavalry Scout - Team Leader/Section Leader (Former Employee) –  Fort Campbell, KYNovember 5, 2014
A typical day at work varied from day to day. Normally everyone would show up between 5:15am, and could be off anywhere between 3pm and 6pm. That is not including time spent in the field training, which could last anywhere between overnight, to a month. Year long deployment rotations meant a lot of time spent away from home, in a high stress environment as well.

I learned a lot from the military, and not all of it is professional development. The military instills a sense of pride, integrity, honor, and good character into people. From a personal standpoint, I believe I've developed a commendable work ethic, good communication between superiors, peers, and subordinates, as well as the desire to succeed and excel. Professionally wise, I've learned leadership and mentoring skills, as well as accountability for high dollar amounts of equipment, and the ability to effectively manage time, resources, and team members.

Management and Co-workers go hand in hand to an extent. The military lifestyle is a sense of controlled chaos, where tasks are constantly being given, and changing, and soldiers are running around getting everything done and reporting back. In the end though, all the required tasks are completed, in a safe and expedient manner. The management does its best to take care of the people underneath them, who in turn take care of their soldiers. Everyone has a specific position and role to play in the military, and when things go well, it's as if we were a well oiled machine. If things change, we're very flexible and adaptive, and can accept a challenge to overcome it.
  more... Majority of my co-workers were very hard working individuals, though sometimes a trouble maker arises. Generally those are the newer soldiers who haven't adapted the military lifestyle completely yet. In time though, they learn to accept the military life and find their position in the team and keep the machine running smoothly.

The hardest part of the job, in my opinion, was also the most enjoyable part of the job, which was deployments. The cons of it were the 9-12 months spent away from family and friends, halfway across the world, in a generally hostile environment. That amount of stress can be tough to handle, but the military does a good job providing resilience training and building up strong characters of their soldiers. The pros about deployments however, is that life was simplified, especially for myself, a single soldier. There were never many surprises on deployment, and typically we followed a very specific routine. We performed our jobs daily, and performed them well. The next day, we'd wake up and do it again. While the specifics of our job varied slightly from day to day, overall it was the same concept.

Overall, in my own personal opinion, I truly enjoyed being a part of the military. I wouldn't be the strong individual I am today, had I not gone through the struggles I had. The military takes care of their service members as best as they can, providing housing, food, insurance and other benefits, all on top of a paycheck. I decided to leave for personal reasons, but if I had the opportunity to do it all over again, I would.
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A great life experience with plenty of opportunties to learn and grow
Signal Support Systems Specialist (Former Employee) –  Fort DrumMarch 25, 2013
A typical day at work would start at 0700 in the morning with PT (Physical Training), which would either be a four mile run or some fashion of muscle building and strengthening workout routines. Afterward, at 0800, it would be dismissal for hygiene then work resumes again at 0930. Mostly, in garrison, my shop was just a help desk for other soldiers. We would receive calls and troubleshoot networking issues or hardware issues such as hard drive failure. If a task could not be completed over the phone, we would send a soldier out to physically fix the problem, the soldier to be sent is usually the one who answered the phone since he or she has attained the most information about the situation immediately after the call has ended.
Deployments, there was a lot more work involved because we had to create our own networks from the ground up, which involved running CAT-5 cable from routers to switches, then switches to computers. We had teams for different jobs, such as a team of soldiers would program the switches and routers. a team to run the cables, and a team to reimage the computers to the standard Operating Systems for the mission area. After everything is initialized and set in place, it's just routine troubleshooting and daily maintenance of the network to ensure that problems are minimized and efficieny is maximized. Other standard help desk procedures are creating accounts and e-mail for soldiers who arrive, and for those that leave, we have to transfer their accounts across our massive database of users to different administrators for different server permissions.
I have
  more... learned much about my job in the military, from creating accounts, to operating various military type radios, to troubleshooting computer hardware and software. I have also learned a lot about growing up. I joined the military when I was straight out of high school, I did not know much about anything, did not have much confidence in myself. After the military, it really showed me the limits I can reach, and just how much I can really do. It proved to me that I have much more potential than I gave myself credit for which boosted my confidence and helped me grow up to be a true adult.
The hardest part of the job is when technology doesn't seem to want to work the way you want it to and after you have applied the routine troubleshooting procedures with no success, you have to spend, sometimes, a considerable amount of time digging down to the roots of the system to understand the source of the issue.
The greatest thing, however, is that when you do overcome difficult situations, it gives a considerable amount of satisfaction in oneself because it proves just how much a person can do or how much has been learned. It really puts the skills and knowledge acquired to the test, and that's what motivates me to work harder and learn more about my job, so I can overcome those problems with confidence.
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Pros
great benefits, job security
Cons
deployments, risk of loss of limb or death
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The Army will allow you to grow in all ways.
Safety Manager (Current Employee) –  Mesa, AZJanuary 21, 2013
At the 82nd Airborne, which is where I spent the most of my time, the typical day would start at 0430 or 0500 when we would, in group, do Physical Training (PT) for one and a half to two hours. Then you have until 0900 to eat, shower and dress and get back to hold formation and give out new daily assignments along with ongoing taskings. Then I would meet with my Superiors and then move on to my taskings. Which I always exceeded at all of the time with the help of the other soldiers at rank, above rank and below rank.
The hardest part of the job is the things that they do not tell you about until you are boots on the ground. things like when you deploy, the Army has by far, the longest deployments. That it is not 12 months, it is 15 months, period. and the "12 month time home" was more like 4 or so months home, if you were lucky..
With the Army, managment was great. You would, once in the while get a guy who was not made for dealing with the troops and was better placed in a better fitting job for all involved.
The by far, hardest part of the job would be to stand there and take responsibility for someone else's personal time, out of your control like Domestic Abuse or DUI/DWI or drugs in a younger soldier, or older that only pop up when these people get caught. There is no fraternization between the ranks and other things. There was and is no concept anymore of personal responsibility. So where was the integrity?
I did not like learning exactly how evil some people could be, killing villages and then fouling wells, strapping explosives to a 3 year old to send her to stand in
  more... front of a convoy and knowing in my mind, how many of our people had to be killed, including the innocent children and then the SOPs that followed. Most of the informed world would know this, but do not want to find out some cultures value their little girls so little. I learned about how ugly that people can be to each other for no reason.
I loved my boys, the ones above me, below me, same rank as I was. I loved the bigh AAAHH that we would give in boot camp, AIT, many trainings and of course re-entering the FOBs and COBs.
The army showed me the world for all of its beauty and for the worst, it took me from a young guy who was from the wrong part of the south part of Phoenix, if there was any good there at all. But the Army made me the man I am today. I am very proud of that man.
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Pros
wonderful insurance, travel, educational benefits, strong on base communities, starting new programs for both the service member and their family.
Cons
no concern during a home medical crisis, leaving family for extended periods, the bad seeds, gang infilitration
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There is always room for achievement in your goals if you have a dream to succeed at life.
Supply Chain Logistics Manager (Former Employee) –  Fort Lee, VAOctober 17, 2014
To work in the United State Army, one must have a well-articulated attitude of discipline, with a mannerly, professional, appearance at all times.
One must be willing to work hard as a Supervisor/team leader, while leading Soldiers, with a positive, mental attitude, while being understanding. One must be also willing to compromise with others, in a positive, influential, win, win situation, while not compromising one' standards and values.
One must be on top of his/her game, while creating room for improvement, by mentoring, subordinates in a timely manner monthly, while encourage them to excel, above and beyond their least expectations of limitations.
One must be also willing to establish a collective way of thinking, informal and formal, while articulating positive vibes, with an outstanding way of verbally communicating or negotiate, amount one', peers, business colleagues, customers and distributors alike. The Army is a very busy, time consuming, professional entity, and establishment, which can make you or break you as an individual. One' must never allow tough decisions making, within a job to break you, as an employee/employer.
One must always learn to seek knowledge from other professionals and learn how to work around tough decisions by asking questions and taking initiative to accomplish the mission with all the support you made have.
Never quite even if the heavens are falling from the sky. There will always be a better day after the storm, heavy rains with it very strong winds after they all subside... Just clean up your damage and learn to move onward by faith.
  more...
Crying over spilled milk does not make the problem any better than it normally is. Learn to bounce back, after the storm is subside! Failure always lead to success in the end.
Success is often not measure by how many time you fell down before you learn to walk, it is measure by how many time you get up, while trying, without quitting, to achieve your goal, to walk alone without any support.

The United State Army, has its' many time limitations and deadlines, which are requirements, that must be met and carry out in a timely and professional manner and to the fullest of completion toward the mission as number one goal.
One bad choice in decision making, can cause delayed in an entire operations which may demand, speedy recovery, in order to complete the task at hand.
Having a well balance, establish, timely layout plan/schedule for meeting deadline is the most important infrastructure for success in the United State Army, while accomplishing one' job/mission and task at a speedy rate.
The hardest part of the job, is not being able to meet a deadline or fulfilled the accomplishment of a mission, due to lack of support, lack of bodies/help and equipment, when not present or at hand. To do be hurting in the above mention while done to any entity/mission is to sabotage the success of the mission accomplishment, with poor planning in any situation on management part.
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Pros
never quick
Cons
failure is not an option to succeed.
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Productive, Fast Paced Environment
Automated Logistics Specialist (Current Employee) –  Schofield Barracks, HINovember 10, 2013
A typical day at work in a motorpool shop office is never typical. Priorities are always shifting as to what tasks should be accomplished first. As a soldier and a logistics specialist, it is my duty to adapt to the priority shift quickly and efficiently. Daily processes of receiving reports and pushing updated information up the chain of command (supervisor chain) quickly and without error. I must ensure all information being sent out is correct and true. If parts are awaiting pick up according to the reports received from the source of supply, I must receive the parts in, in-process them through our supply management system, then allocate parts according to the requisition. I also deal daily with vehicle operators, mechanics, and administrators, therefore I must be able to communicate well with others both junior and senior to my position.

Through my four years of military experience, I have learned vital skills necessary for success. I have learned to be adaptable, detail oriented, dead-line driven, and result motivated. I am a self-starter. It is ingrained in me to be early to work. I am more inclined to make sacrifices of my life and my time to make sure dead-lines are met, standards are upheld, and tasks are finished efficiently. I have learned to treat customers as individual cases, not just "another face". Accountability for myself, my actions, and any product in my control is yet another skill the military teaches.

Management for the military is never an easy task. My supervisors are each their own level of hierarchy. Often in the flow of information from top to bottom
  more... crucial pieces of information would get lost in translation. So from that, I have learned the vital importance of accurate and timely information output.

My co-workers all come from a wide range of back-grounds. Each with their own stories, their own strengths, their own weaknesses. In the military I learned to help my co-workers transition into the military mind-set and feed off their strengths while building their weaknesses up. I have learned to not only task junior co-workers out, but also work along side them. I am also a mentor to the in-coming personnel so they know what standards they are to adhere to and become proficient at their job.

The hardest part of my job are the odd hours. I like consistency and the task of being both soldier and logistical specialist does not provide a consistent schedule. Work hours vary from day to day and often with no forewarning, so it's hard to make time for family and friends, hobbies, or personal errands. So through that, I am better at time management and have learned to be flexible with schedules.

The most enjoyable part of my job is my service to my customers. I enjoy helping people. I enjoy knowing my customers by name and face and being able to interact with them as individuals, not just as "another face".
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Pros
healthcare benefits, retirement opportunities, travel to new places, meet new people, close-knit family-like environment.
Cons
odd hours, minimal opportunity for advancement, family separation
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19+ years of military service
Soldier/Officer (Current Employee) –  Ft Huachuca, AZJanuary 28, 2015
I entered the Army fresh out of high school with the goal to have them pay for college after a two year enlistment. I loved it so much, I re-enlisted for three more years. During that five years, I lived in Germany, North Carolina, Kentucky and Puerto Rico (Humanitarian Mission). It was something for a kid from Peoria, IL. I learned how to lead small teams when given a task, direction and purpose. From being lead to being a small group leader, was a moving experience. I learned from hands-on training and wonderful leadership, who over the years trusted me to perform at higher levels and encourage my advancement in rank to Sergeant. I still made a promise to myself to get a college degree as a full time student, so I got out of the Army to reach that milestone. If it were not for the Army and my leadership to instill the discipline and motivation to see things through to the end, I would not have been prepared to college. I was able to work 30 hours a week, while going to school full time, as a married father of two small children. The Army taught me how to manage and prioritize effectively. During college, I missed the Army and the lifestyle and numerous options to support my family. I joined ROTC and commissioned in 2000 as an Ordnance Officer (Logistics). During the next 14 years, I served as a officer in various and challenging positions. Because the Army had me change jobs every year, I was able to learn a broad spectrum of logistics- from maintenance management, warehousing, transportation, distribution and budgeting/ forecasting. A typical day at work would include a leader's  more... meeting at 5:30 am, physical training at 6:30 am, and daily operational and training meetings from 9:00 am to 7:00 pm. Days may have been long, but they were worthwhile and I always learned something new. The hardest part of the job was the 41 months total I spent deployed in either Iraq and Afghanistan; however, this is also viewed as my most enjoyable. I was part of a team that made a difference everyday, using our months and years of training towards a real mission. I commanded for 15 months in Afghanistan, and the 200+ men and women I led where the only reason I came back home successful. We bonded as a close knit family- picking up each other if times were tough; motivating and praising each other during times of great happiness. I was able to promote young Soldiers to leaders (Sergeant) and present achievement awards for their bravery and over success. These times for me and my family were memorable- the Army was a most enjoyable ride.  less
Pros
excellent pay; medical and dental for families; travel
Cons
deployments; moving family every year to two years
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Former 68R
Military Food Inspector (Former Employee) –  Fort Leavenworth, KSFebruary 12, 2013
The Army is truly what you make it and really comes down to how your command and leaders want to run your organization.
My job in the Army was Veterinarian food inspector, the most unheard of job in the army. The training I received was sub par yet enough to obtain a basic understanding of how to my job. I was supposed to be groomed at my first duty station in the actual aspects of my duties, however I had a NCOIC who was extremely selfish and exploited his rank and position into the least amount of work possible. Myself and my coworker however became proficient a tour work through our own research and with the help of knowledgeable DeCA employees such as the produce manager and an extremely wise meat department manager.

The real key to the military is too constantly do what you are told and whatever you can do to please your supervisors. Shoot expert at your qualifications, obtain a 290+ PT score, and have an outstanding uniform. These three things will generally be more important than how well you can perform your actual job.

Management in the Army has too much potential for abuse as their seems to be no accountability as soon as a soldier hits even first line supervisor status. As an enlisted soldier, regardless of your job you are expected to be a do-er not a thinker and you will be called on to all of the jobs that anyone else with any amount of rank chooses to not to do. I will say while I served under a pathetically incompetent command, I did meet many leaders of other organizations that were true credits to the Army such as the NCOIC of the Veterinarian clinic and
  more... the Military police force that was located on our post.

My coworker were extremely varied but overall bright, fit and driven. Those equal or below me and rank were hardworking individuals who excelled on and off their jobs. I along with many of my coworkers obtained collegiate education while serving in the Army and left with better opportunities.

Honestly the hardest part of my job was my former supervisor treatment of myself and my coworkers. We were constantly blamed for his screw ups and he would never recognize any achievements regardless of scale. Feeling worthless for 3+ years will really take a toll on a person. Other than that you get used to early morning PT, dressing your class a's, and giving up many of your freedoms.

The most enjoyable part of the job was the ridiculously easy workload, job stability, and benefits. I loved meeting good hard working people from all walks of life and getting to really know myself better.
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Pros
gi bill, giving back to your country, great building block for your future
Cons
shitbag leadership, total loss of control over your life.
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ARMY LIFE
Administration, Operations & Logistics Specialist (Former Employee) –  Fort Bragg, NCApril 13, 2013
Loyalty

Bear true faith and allegiance to the U.S. Constitution, the Army, your unit and other Soldiers. Bearing true faith and allegiance is a matter of believing in and devoting yourself to something or someone. A loyal Soldier is one who supports the leadership and stands up for fellow Soldiers. By wearing the uniform of the U.S. Army you are expressing your loyalty. And by doing your share, you show your loyalty to your unit.

Duty

Fulfill your obligations. Doing your duty means more than carrying out your assigned tasks. Duty means being able to accomplish tasks as part of a team. The work of the U.S. Army is a complex combination of missions, tasks and responsibilities — all in constant motion. Our work entails building one assignment onto another. You fulfill your obligations as a part of your unit every time you resist the temptation to take “shortcuts” that might undermine the integrity of the final product.

Respect

Treat people as they should be treated. In the Soldier’s Code, we pledge to “treat others with dignity and respect while expecting others to do the same.” Respect is what allows us to appreciate the best in other people. Respect is trusting that all people have done their jobs and fulfilled their duty. And self-respect is a vital ingredient with the Army value of respect, which results from knowing you have put forth your best effort. The Army is one team and each of us has something to contribute.

Selfless Service

Put the welfare of the nation, the Army and your subordinates before your own. Selfless service is larger than just one person. In serving
  more... your country, you are doing your duty loyally without thought of recognition or gain. The basic building block of selfless service is the commitment of each team member to go a little further, endure a little longer, and look a little closer to see how he or she can add to the effort.

Honor

Live up to Army values. The nation’s highest military award is The Medal of Honor. This award goes to Soldiers who make honor a matter of daily living — Soldiers who develop the habit of being honorable, and solidify that habit with every value choice they make. Honor is a matter of carrying out, acting, and living the values of respect, duty, loyalty, selfless service, integrity and personal courage in everything you do.

Integrity

Do what’s right, legally and morally. Integrity is a quality you develop by adhering to moral principles. It requires that you do and say nothing that deceives others. As your integrity grows, so does the trust others place in you. The more choices you make based on integrity, the more this highly prized value will affect your relationships with family and friends, and, finally, the fundamental acceptance of yourself.

Personal Courage

Face fear, danger or adversity (physical or moral). Personal courage has long been associated with our Army. With physical courage, it is a matter of enduring physical duress and at times risking personal safety. Facing moral fear or adversity may be a long, slow process of continuing forward on the right path, especially if taking those actions is not popular with others. You can build your personal courage by daily standing up for and acting upon the things that you know are honorable.
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Pros
everything
Cons
nothing
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Hobbies and likes: Travel, Culture, Hiking, Climbing, Camping, and Long range rifle shooting.
None Commissioned Officer, Supply (Former Employee) –  FT Hood texasNovember 4, 2014
Goal oriented professional with outstanding interpersonal and First-Line Supervisor skills. Dedicated team-player; able to multi-task and work independently. Possess exceptional clerical skills and technically proficient in all Microsoft applications to include Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, and Outlook. Extensive experience managing difficult issues in intense, difficult circumstances. Highly motivated, results oriented individual with a tenacious, positive attitude that does what it takes to get the job done with no excuses.

A typical day at work I would:
Plan work schedules and assign duties to maintain adequate staff for effective performance of activities and response to fluctuating workloads. Collaborate with workers and managers to solve work-related problems. Review work throughout the work process and at completion to ensure that it has been performed properly. Transmit and explain work orders to Soldiers. Check specifications of materials loaded or unloaded against information contained in work orders. Inform designated employees or departments of items loaded or problems encountered. Examine freight to determine loading sequences. Evaluate employee performance and prepare performance appraisals. Perform the same work duties as those supervised or perform more difficult or skilled tasks or assist in their performance. Prepare and maintain work records and reports of information such as employee time, daily receipts, or inspection results
Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking
  more... questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Coordination — Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.

Management of Personnel Resources — Motivating, developing, and directing people as they work, identifying the best people for the job.

Complex Problem Solving — Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.

Judgment and Decision Making — Considering the relative costs

and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

Reading Comprehension — Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

Instructing — Teaching others how to do something.

Monitoring — Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
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Pros
good pay
Cons
long distance/travel to and from work.
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Experiences in Korea
Sergeant First Class (Former Employee) –  Uijeongbu, South KoreaApril 30, 2013
Typical day at work
I was a head of HR department
I led 4 privates and 1 elementary officer co-work who is just work for 1 year or less. I had to be a head because of just only my specialty adjutant. Korea Army discriminates only less than 50 adjutant a year

The hardest part of the job, co-workers, and management
I had no problem with my job but I didn't like tax-return service for 40 staffs. It wasn't necessary duty but some of they are so lazy, some of they are not good at computer so didn't input their information in the system. I should help them and that case causes every body loves me especially I work for them something related money like a applying family allowance, removal expenses. It takes so long time to do it for so many people. Sometimes I had to search for Korean law to make them happy but I liked it too because of the feeling that I'm very useful even it's not related work. I think I enjoyed it too, it made me smart and gave me confidences.

I can tell first one year was my one of the hardest period. The main reason was it was so different work and what I learned. My senior who was working at my position was not adjutant, his specialty was Signalman but he has been working for 5 years and good at work the only thing is he didn't like me because of the nothing that I'm going to take his position. Army a manpower supply and demand plan problem caused a hard time for me and him but eventually we are fine, he moved to upper base as different position but he didn't hate me. It was harder when the relationship had some issue with my junior than senior because of I
  more... really didn't have a big trouble with seniors. He was a new guy who was behaves bad I lectured him being lazy, idleness, etiquette and one day I was exploded by his mistakes. I shouldn't but I was so mad it was serious situation of laxity of discipline but my boss couldn't care because they were so busy. We were under a state of emergency in 2010 by North Korea bombards. I request him reconciliation and I told him that I reflect on my words I did to him and he reflect on his behave as well so it was fine after dine. But eventually he had to leave department by disciplinary action. The reason he behaved so badly was he had a issue with his girlfriend and the fortune he had before he came to serve from his parents. That made me partially understand him.

The most enjoyable part of the job
I think it was hanging out with co-workers after work. As you know relationship is sometimes really hard and sometimes really easy I think it's up to the way expression, communication, and it makes understanding for each others and develops relationship. Sometimes my followers are disappointed by me and they disappoint me but after its happens just drank a beer and talk to each other and try to fix it each other.
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Challenging
Battalion Operations Officer (Current Employee) –  HawaiiFebruary 19, 2014
I learned a great deal from the Army. I learned how to push myself to the limits, maybe a little too much. I learned great management skills that now I can use in the civilian sector. My typical day consisted of physical fitness, followed by motor pool operations, warehouse operations, SSA operations (Supply support activity). I was in charge or over-seeing my Platoon and making sure everything ran smoothly and in a timely fashion. It was my job to ensure parts and equipment made it to their destination on time. The SSA was comprised of receiving/issuing/storage/turn-in/stock control. If one section falls behind it could impact the whole operation and all of the Soldiers within the warehouse. In addition to these duties, it was my job to run the property books, ensuring that all inventory was accounted for on a monthly basis. I also gave briefs, attended daily meetings, counseling Soldiers, mentored non-commissioned officers, put together and trained a sling load team, trained Soldiers in the field, and prepared for future deployments. I managed all Soldiers files as well to include any issues, medical appointments, promotions, training needed, etc.The hardest part of my job was when I saw Soldiers in other Platoons who were over-weight and out of shape, but full of potential and not being able to do much about it because they were already being kicked out of the Army. I wanted to be able to help them, and pull them aside and work with them after duty hours, put them on an exercise plan, work-out with them to get them back on track so they could stay in the military. I had some  more... of my own Soldiers in the same situation and I was able to help them get out of trouble to the point where they were able to stay in the military. The most enjoyable part of the job was when my Soldiers would come up to me and say, ma'am, I don't ever want another Platoon Leader, or when I would give a brief in front of my chain of command and afterwards be told that I did an outstanding job with my presentation. It was extremely enjoyable when I knew I made a difference, when I was able to impact a Soldier's life positively. I had 16 Soldiers ask me to re-enlist them while I was Platoon Leader within a nine month time frame and that is pretty much unheard of and to me, that is better than any medal that I could ever receive. To know that I have impacted that many Soldiers (from different Platoon's) during their re-enlistment period, for them to ask me to swear them back in for another term is an honor in itself.  less
Pros
serving my country, benefits
Cons
long hours, away from home
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Professional work place, caring and fun
Food Service Specialist (Former Employee) –  Fort Sill, OKNovember 20, 2014
A typical day at work would be coming in to work at 5am, standing in a single line facing our manager so he can inspect us on our clean hygiene and work supply for the job. our manger then chooses a supervisor for that day and gives the names of each person that will be working in each section. After the inspection is done each person in that section looks for the product he or she has to prepare for that day and looks for the recipe card to make that product. after all recipe cards are gather for that section each person in that section choose which product they will prepare and start gathering everything they need to make that product. we start cooking the product base on the recipe card. After the meals are all ready we place them in the warmer to keep warm until we open to eat. We also sever the food while backing the food up so we don't run out of food. we continue to do this from breakfast (7:30am -9:00), lunch (11:30am -1pm), and until the end of dinner (5pm-6:30pm). After lunch is done we clean up and our supervisor inspects the all the areas. once we given the ok from the supervisor that each area is clean the manager tell us what time to come in the next morning and we are then release to go.
I have learned how to become a team player and also a team leader. I have learned how to inspect food, people, and equipment to make sure that all things as within the safety food limits so we don't get people sick from eating the food we cook. learned how to supervise, be professional at the work place, but more over I leaned how to do my job well and how to do my supervisor
  more... job.
Management was always good and bad. some people wouldn't tolerate mistakes and wrote people up for them, and some would help you to correct your mistake and showed you the right way to do things.
I love each and everyone of my co-worker they work hard to get the job done and so did I. we learned together, ate together, even helped those who were behind in their work load. we banded together and became a family.
The hardest part of the job was trying to get days off. it was stressful working 15 hours every day from 5am to 7pm. we were not like other soldiers getting weekends, and holidays off . we worked harder on holidays to feed people and keep them happy. Just having time off was a blessing.
The most enjoyable part is two parts. the first part was seeing people enjoy the food you made for them and them telling you how much they love your food. and the second is meeting new people from far away land and making friend and family ties with them, people you never would have meet if not for the U.S Army.
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Pros
take old food home, worked to our music
Cons
almost no time for lunch break, rare off days, hard to advance, not enough people
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Overall rating

4.5
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