U.S. Marine Corps Employee Reviews

What people are saying about U.S. Marine Corps

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A great place for a career or a stepping stone for future career(s)
Captain, Communications (Current Employee) –  29 Palms, CASeptember 2, 2015
The Marine Corps is a great place to learn about yourself and grow as a person. Entry into the enlisted ranks is not too hard unless you got in trouble for poor decisions or you are not deemed fit to enter. Boot Camp will probably be the first time someone experiences a mental hardship and has to deal with it for three straight months. Entry into the officer ranks is a different matter. It requires a potential candidate to be extremely physically fit, have no legal issues and demonstrate good grades in college. Potential high schoolers can go through the officer ranks by attending the Naval Academy which is a demanding four year school.

It depends on your Military Occupational Speciality (MOS) for what you do at work. In the enlisted side, you start at the bottom and do jobs reserved for janitors besides doing basic MOS work. Keep in mind that the senior enlisted have had to do this when they started out. This eliminates the need to hire outside sources and instills the discipline to make things better than when you receive it. In the military police (MP) (not deployed), you have many different jobs: Sentry duty, dispatcher, patrol of the base and areas that need security checks, work at the passhouse which authorizes people entry into base, services (DARE, Traffic Court Bailiff, maintenance) along with other jobs that require competent individuals (Special Reaction Team, Traffic Investigation Division, Dog Handler). For most MPs a day consists of standing on gate, patrolling the base of dispatching working on shifts. They validate that people can go on case, enforce
  more... base regulations and state law, conduct security checks and answer and go on calls for base workers/residents. Sometimes days are slow, sometimes there is a crisis going on such as a bomb threat or some kind of security breach. There are additional duties such as formations and cleaning up living areas once a week or more if areas are dirty. You will attend physical fitness training everyday or every other day before or at the end of each shift.

On the officer side, there are more duties you have. Fortunately you generally have a senior enlisted Marine to advise and help you. Your days consist of meetings, managing and inspecting equipment, mentoring your Marines, writing awards and evaluations, working with your Commanding Officer (CO) and Operations Officer (Ops O) for operations, as well as holding additional duties such as completing investigations, or also take responsibility for a program that needs to be updated and followed such as a Safety Officer. Sometimes you will be relieved of all duties to focus on the additional billet outside of your MOS. This is a good thing since it shows that the unit is well-staffed and it's something different for a short time. The day may consist of getting accountability of your Marines when you conduct physical fitness training or at the start of the work day, then meeting with your key personnel to give tasks, receive updates, procure additional equipment and/or handle internal issues. Once you receive the documents or project you asked for, you will look over everything to ensure that everything makes sense, has correct grammar and meets all requirements. There will be meetings held by the CO and the Ops O at a time which works best for their schedules. You will attend these meeting to update the CO and Ops O and receive further guidance or provide a better course of action if possible. During certain times of the year, you will need to write up evaluations for all of your Marines. This will take up a lot of your time. Every quarter you will look over all of your equipment to ensure it is there and is being taken care of. This will take up a lot of your time if you are responsible for a lot of equipment.

The Marine Corps has many great leaders, along with bad ones. A good leaders will mentor you and allow you to grow to be a better leader. You will want to gain some the qualities you hold dear from your boss or even some of the squared away junior Marines. The poor leaders will not develop you to be a better leader, whether it's because they do not care or create unreasonable expectations. If you have a bad leader, you need to make it through since Marines transfer to other units in under three years. The CO generally has the final say for everything and will implement a plan for his or her unit. That is why leaders need to be engaged to implement plans for the best use of time and employee management. Your engagement with your boss and your subordinates will bring in good ideas and squash bad ideas with good intentions. I have been fortunate to have more great leaders than poor leaders.

Your fellow Marines know the struggle and this is why the military has a bond that no fraternity or sorority can match. A Marine does not have to be your friend to get a job done, you will do what it takes to ensure that the mission is a success. Poor performers sometimes get tasked with the jobs no one wants to do or get an easy job and gets his or her peers mad. But in the long run, they usually are not recommended for promotion. There are times when stellar performers don't get additional training since the unit "needs" that Marine for a job that needs to be done right. The best thing to do is to do the best you can, care about your duty and not worry about other people unless it affects the mission or degrades morale. The enlisted Marines have many peers in their workplace and it's easy to make friends and develop bonds that last a lifetime. The officer side is a little bit lonelier since there are fewer officers, but it's not as bad as it sounds. Either way, having a buddy makes things go by easier.

The hard part of the Marine Corps if the time you spend away from your family, death in combat (and not in combat), high stress situations and having to deal with your Marines that get in trouble if you are in a leadership role. Another factor is having a horrible boss. Marines are trained to handle pressure so this isn't too bad.

The great thing about the Marine Corps, is that we take care of our own. I said earlier that Marines are trained to handle pressure, but not every situation is easily solved. We have many resources to help out each Marine, whether it's stress at home, alcohol or drug abuse, or stress from a deployment. The benefits are great, and is well-deserved since military members do a job that the majority of the United States is afraid of. A poor person can join the Marine Corps and be successful inside and out as long as they work hard and make smart decisions. The comraderie from earning the title "Marine" and enduring the hardship while in, will provide friendships that last a lifetime. Especially with social media, I would trust a good friend living in Ohio to help me out if I needed it. The travel is great. With the exception of a few study stations, you will be close to a coast or be overseas. If overseas, it's easy and cheap to travel within southeast Asia, Australia (still can be expensive), Europe, Hawaii or stateside beaches. I know Marines that have lived and travelled in one state, and have been able able to travel all over the world.
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Pros
Earn 30 days of leave a year, great benefits, travel, develop to be a better leader (a better you), variety of jobs, retirement (for now)
Cons
Long hours, possible to experience loss, 4-5 year contract to fulfill
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Network Security
Sr. Network Security (Former Employee) –  Fort Washington, MDApril 15, 2012
Logistics Support Services-
Create, sustain and improve enterprise level logistics support program.
Work with customers and IT staff to ensure appropriate funding is available to meet logistics requirements.
Support transportation of classified and unclassified intelligence IT equipment and personnel throughout the world.

Capital Equipment Replacement Program and Commodity Management Services -
Support the sustainment of the DoD enterprise Capital Equipment Replacement Program (CERP) as well as Commodity Management strategies and schedules; research, analyze, and provide mid and long-term future hardware and software commodity and CERP recommendations.
Maintain lists of DIA approved hardware and software in an enterprise information database; coordinate provisioning actions with Government staff to ensure availability of funds, purchase methods, and acquisition timelines; plan and prioritize resources for near term replacement schedules for DoDIIS enterprise organizations.

Enterprise Inventory and Asset Management Services -
Maintain and improve the enterprise IT inventory and asset management program. Provide a capability to accurately account for and report on the location and configuration of all DoDIIS enterprise hardware, software, and related property in a real time asset management information system that supports service delivery, accountability, life cycle management, and acquisition planning.

Lead Network Security

Intrusion detection system monitoring and analysis security event identification and analysis Incident response and coordination activities System/application
  more... security log review maintain an understanding of the current vulnerabilities, response, and mitigation strategies used to support cyber security operations.
Provide trend analysis for correlated information sources and network data such as event logs, IDS, and network
captures. Support the development of incident handling, detection and threat mitigation procedures
Support customer direct investigation of cyber activity targeting customer information and its information infrastructure
Assist the customer training department in the education of staff on the cyber threat.

Writing all the cat 1 cat 2 cat 3 cat 4 reports

Thinking like a hacker to anticipate attack vectors and creating arcsight content to detect it

 Creating, Maintaining, and Troubleshooting ArcSight dynamic interface content including Dashboards, Data Monitors, Active Channels, Rules, Filters, Reports, Zones
• Coming up with innovative solutions to complex analytical and technical challenges
• Integrating numerous types of cyber security data feeds into ArcSight
• Researching Internet cyber security sites for information specific to customer system vulnerabilities
• Working collaboratively with other cyber analysts on research projects that involve event analysis to determine trends
• Writing error-free reports the first time
• Developing ad-hoc reports as required by the customer where a more in-depth analysis is required
with other members of the team when developing cyber security reports
• Assisting ArcSight account holders with product use
• Maintaining version control and document all changes per configuration management guidelines
• Assisting with the upgrade and maintainance to current supported version
• Sharing expertise with other members on the team

Duties and responsibilities shall include the software management of:
o Encase Enterprise
o Encase Cyber Security
o ArcSight Express
o NetWitness
o FireEye Email Protection
o FireEye Web Protection
o Jump Servier
.
Detection, response, mitigation, and/or reporting of cyber threats affecting client networks and one or more of the following: experience in computer intrusion analysis and incident response; intrusion detection; computer network surveillance/monitoring; knowledge and understanding of network protocols, network devices, multiple operating systems, and secure architectures; experience in computer evidence seizure, computer forensic analysis, and data recovery; or computer network forensics.

Reset Check Point password, VPN account and locked out accounts.
Successfully planned date security for new and modified software by discussing with computer user
Monitored over 5000 PCs and scanned daily for update/application assessments and penetration testing
Used Windows security center/windows automatic updating, anti-malware software settings, internet security settings, and using and user account control settings/ and resolve any identified security issues
Ensured compatibility of planned security measures with computer security systems software of the organization by reviewing plans.
Analyzed the system deeply to protect it from virus outbreaks and from hacker and cracker attacks.
Ensured compatibility of planned security measures with computer security systems software of the organization by reviewing plans.
Responsible for installation, maintenance and configuration of PCs and network operating systems.
Maintenance of the network backup systems and network’s authorization infrastructure.
Performed configuration of authorization, authentication and directory services.
Responsible for troubleshooting and debugging network related issues.
Assigned IP addresses to the devices that are connected to the network.
Handled the tasks of routing table configuration and routing protocols.
Maintained network servers including VPN gateways, file servers and intrusion detection systems.
Responsible for protecting stored data on the computer system of the organization.
Kept vital information from being stolen by installing various types of software as well as implementing policies.
Handled troubleshooting in case of system malfunctions as well as monitors inter office network of the organization.
Dealt with patching systems as well as locking down systems so that access was by authorized personnel only.
Maintained network facilities such as setting personnel computers, drivers and printers, and maintained the security regarding logical and physical access to system.
Responsible for the equipment monitor, data and voice networks.
Responsible for installation, maintenance and configuration of PCs and network operating systems and maintenance of the network backup systems and network’s authorization infrastructure.

Security Tools
Net Witness 9.5
Arc Sight Console 5.0
Fire Eye
Jump Server
Blue Coat
Source Fire
Foot Print
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A cultural and diverse institution guarenteed to breed loyalty morals and ethics
Machine Gunner (Current Employee) –  Jacksonville, NCSeptember 21, 2013
-a typical day at work can sometimes be frustrating due to the constant changing of plans and the many sprints and lulls that occure throughout the day. Although, few things can deter the sense of comradery that you share with the brothers to the left and right of you knowing everyone is in it together and together everyone will adapt and overcome and see it through to the end no matter if it is getting everyone accounted for at formation or a 5 click patrol in Afghanistan.

-Anyone is bound to learn a variety of things but the most usefull knowledge I have gained has been about myself. The Marine Corp has an uncanning ability to give you more information about yourself than you thought was possible. Strengths, weaknesses, limits and range of my abilities are unmistakenly evident. It has only added to my personal resume and I am better for it.

-Managment is a difficult topic. Their is a saying the Marine Corp has in relation to this topic. "The best plan is only good until first contact." So it is not the ability to manage that is notable. It is the ability of each individual to adapt and overcome that gives this orginization its versatility to thrive where others, who under the banner of 'managment', would surely perish. It is small unit managment that makes adaptation possible. If one were to ask "where does 'small unit managment' come from then?" Ultimately, at its deepest root, it is individual managment which is combined with other individuals who have been taught to govern themselves and think independently and at the same time think as part of the unit which is a tightly
  more... knit family of teams and squads.

-My 'co-workers', or, more accuratly defined, my 'brothers', can be described in a very similar context to that of biological brothers. At times we disagree, we fight, sometimes to the point of not wanting to spend another second around each other. But at the end of the day, like biological brothers, we converse, create and accomplish, along side each other, unimaginable feats. Its the friction we experience together that brings us that binds us together. It is a bitter-sweet experience that anyone whos ever had to work together and has experienced the friction between opposing goals, can appreciate.

-The hardest part of my job is to keep myself well oiled in all aspects of my responcibilities. The seemingly infinite amount of knowledge we are expected to retain that isnt even directly related to my job and to be the subject matter expert on Machine Guns is excrutiatingly difficult. In my past jobs, its easy to come into work everyday knowing what must be done and executing the same skills required to get the job done right everyday for 8 hours a day. Skills and techniques build on each other and with each confrontation of a real life situation you grow confidence in your ability to deal with future conflicts. The difference with my job in the Marine Corp is that I reside in the United States, in Camp Lejuene NC, having no actual reason to have to execute my skills as a Machine Gunner. We train by imagining scenarios or taking past scenarios and incorporating them with notional or stationary enemies at the range or in the field. Imagine being stuck in training for a job that you cannot utilize your skills and knowledge in real life scenarios. You understand your training but cannot utilize it in actual situations. This concept breathes life into the saying "if you dont use it, you loose it". This amplifies the necessity of self-initiative. You need to consistently train yourself in aspects where higher authority might have lossed focus. This is, in my opinion, the most difficult part of the job

-The most enjoyable part of the job has been, hands down, the sense of pride I have for serving our country. Civilians from all walks of life, regardless of their political stance or even national upbringing have consistently shown their undying support to our military. Cars have stopped out of turn in the middle of the street to allow me to cross, meals have been offered to be paid for, thanks and gratitude is abundant amongst stangers when they hear or see I am in the Marine Corp, veterans of wars of far greater autrocities than Ill see in my lifetime have expressed an inconceivable amount of debt to me for my service. It is to easy in my line of work to forget how much it means to civilians that we do what we do. It is unmeasurable how much these seemingly small tokens of appreciation go in reminding me that in all the mundane, the hardships and sacrifices, it is worth it.
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Pros
travel opportunities, sense of pride
Cons
mundane, constant changes, sacrifice
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Best decision was enlisting, second best decision was leaving.
Intelligence Specialist (Marines) (Former Employee) –  OverseasNovember 6, 2013
Pros:
-Pride of serving your country, contributing to an important mission that can't be quantified.
-Steady promotions if you enlist in a technical field, do your job and don't screw up.
-Extensive overseas travel - I was in the Marine Corps for 8.5 years, and during that time, spent most of it in Asia or the Middle East. Some of it was for combat purposes, but there was a lot of "fun time" after work...Thailand and the Philippines come to mind.
-Challenge, at no point would I have gone back in time to enlist in another branch; every Marine is a rifleman, and even as an intelligence specialist I went to the field and played with a weapons more than enough times in and out of training environments.
-Free college. Literally, free. If you don't take advantage of this while active or after an enlistment, you're wrong.
-Top Secret clearance, for certain jobs. Serving in the Marine Corps opened up many doors for me in the defense intelligence community.

Cons:
Long story short, I enlisted as an intelligence specialist and accepted a $50k reenlistment bonus to serve an additional 4 years after serving 5 to continue in the intelligence field. Not long after I reenlisted, I was ordered to recruiting duty. Most recruiters are not volunteers, and although I had a "successful" tour, the entire time I was made to work 14+ hours a day, 6, 7 days a week, no leave time ever, for the remainder of my enlistment being a salesperson. The command was toxic, constantly making recruiters work ridiculous hours for no reason, belittling and yelling at Marines if they didn't hit their quotas, made to
  more... work even longer hours, have their careers threatened daily, and be forced to do lengthy drives up to the HQ for 7 hours (with or without the required amount of sleep prior to operating a government vehicle). It was very common for marriages on recruiting to end up in divorce. The treatment was so poor that I volunteered almost a year out of my contract early, and accepted a job as a civilian intelligence officer for the private sector for much higher pay.
In summary:
-Uneven pay compensation; a forklift operator makes the same amount of money as an air traffic controller.
-Horrible working hours, work is never separate from your personal life, in or out of a combat environment. $50k a year is peanuts when you're putting in 80+ hour work weeks constantly with no ability to take time off because mission always comes first, family second.
-Toxic leadership; SNCOs and officers think it's okay to treat lower enlisted Marines less than human whenever they are in a bad mood, and there is little to no oversight for abuse of authority.
-Dictatorial management. Even tactful questioning of an order is culturally seen as disrespect met with yelling and punishment, resulting in younger Marines unable to communicate or take the initiative out of fear.
-You may be ordered to do a completely different job than what you signed up for numerous years, and you won't be able to quit or change orders. This kills morale and trying to attain experience in a specific field, which is touted as a perk by recruiters but doesn’t actually happen in practice.
-High stress, low reward. You really have to be a glutton for punishment to make a career out of it.
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Pros
see review
Cons
see review
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An Amazing Experience
Logistic Vehicle Systems/Marksmanship Instructor (Former Employee) –  Washington, DCFebruary 3, 2014
A typical day in the Marine Corp could be any number of things. As a Logistic Vehicle Systems Operator (3533), we were mostly in the motor-pool (truck lot) performing pre-maintenance checks on multiple vehicles. Other days we would get orders to go on runs (pick-up and delivery) to transport troops or cargo and would ensure proper loading and weight distribution. At one point I had a HAZMAT and explosives license and have delivered millions of dollars in TNT filled artillery rounds, grenades, AT4s (single shot rocket propelled grenades RPGs), C4, and thousand upon thousands of rounds for M16A2 Service Riffles, 50 Cal., 240 GOLF, and SAW machineguns. All my runs were performed safe and incident free. As a Primary Marksmanship Instructor (8532) and Marksmanship Unit Training Chief I would have to do all kinds of things in order to qualify over 300 Marines while I was stationed in Okinawa, Japan. As a part of the headquarters and Support Company of 3rd TSB, I would have to contact each of the 5 company training NCOs and request 5 Marines who needed to qualify on the riffle range. I had to get the Marine's name, rank, blood type, social security number, meal card number and previous range score. Once my roster was completed using Microsoft Excell, I would put in a vehicle request to transport Marines to the armory where they would check out their assigned M16A2 or M9mm. I then would record the weapon's serial number and add it to my roster and inspect all their weapons for cleanliness and proper functioning. I would then return with Marines and their weapons to the MTU (marksmanship  more... training unit) and either me or the Instructors placed under my charge would begin teaching the fundamentals of marksmanship and weapons safety. From there we would use the ISMT (indoor simulated marksmanship training) computer program to get them snapped in (used to prepare and get comfortable with shooting positions) and monitor their shooting habits and problem areas. After one week (5 business days at 8 hours/day) of classes and preparation I would put in for a range request and give the range all the Marines information. I also put in meal request and vehicle request in order for the Marines to have a bagged lunch prepared to take to the range. Once we picked up Marines, meals and weapons we would go to the riffle range and begin by setting up their BZO (battle sight zero) on the riffle, ensuring each weapon was sighted properly for each Marine. We would identify problem areas for Marines having trouble and assist all Marines down range keeping safety as a top priority. Once Marines were qualified (no later then the fourth day on the range), I would ensure proper recording of range scores to the Range Master, the company each Marine came from, and the Headquarter and Support Company. The last day of the second week, Friday, was reserved for gas chamber followed by suicide prevention, and domestic violence awareness classes also given by either me or one of the Marines placed under my charge. Some of the best leaders I've ever met were in the Marine Corps. I still have many friends that I keep in contact with that were my co-workers. The hardest part of the job is never knowing from one day to the next where you will be. I have saw and done things in the Marines that most people will never even dream about. I wouldn't exchange those experiences for anything.  less
Pros
travel, training, excitement, leadership, exercise, honor, respect and loyalty
Cons
away from loved ones, never know where you will be, sometimes poor leadership.
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A worthwhile investment of time.
Staff Sergeant (Current Employee) –  JPIOctober 23, 2015
In the Marine Corps, I gained valuable skills that I will carry with me for the rest of my life. Confidence, leadership, flexibility, adaptability, moral and ethical courage, and maturity are among the top skills I gained, but the overall number of skills any individual has the potential to gain is countless. Obviously, individual results vary based on which unit you are a part of, who your leadership is and how they were mentored, or a thousand other variables.
For most Marines, a typical day at work in the fleet begins with physical training (PT) first thing in the morning, i.e. before the sun rises. Cardiovascular endurance and upper body strength are highly valued. After PT, Marines are allotted a certain amount of time to eat, shower, and change into the uniform of the day, which depends on your training or maintenance schedule. Lunch hours run from 11:00 a.m. through 1:00 p.m., but that does not mean that you will get two full hours to eat. In the afternoon, you will continue with your training schedule until completion, which for most is between 4:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. unless otherwise specified. The items on the training schedule encompass everything you will need to accomplish to maintain readiness and currency, ranging from classroom instruction to field exercises, and the possibilities are endless. Most Marines have weekends and federal holidays off. There are great travel opportunities to be had, depending on your specific military occupational specialty (MOS) and obviously, deployments.
Your leadership will vary no matter where you go or what you do, which can
  more... be interesting and beneficial - developing new problem-solving skills is a must if you want to progress. Officers have the final say in nearly everything, but the enlisted leadership runs the show, and you will learn this along the way.
Your peers are perhaps the best reason to join. Nowhere else in any job will you find such a diverse group of men and women working together toward the same goal. You will learn to rely and trust on people you barely know, but you will develop a strong character judgment as well. Knowing who to trust with certain tasks will come easily to you.
There are, of course, many hardships. Prolonged separation from family, low pay, few incentives, and ever-changing doctrine/policy/orders/methods/training/leadership are among the worst, in my opinion. Hours spent in mass briefings (which are on common sense topics and are held annually) are a huge reason many choose to leave the service. You will have no choice but to overcome these obstacles if you want to be promoted and be retained during reenlistment.
For me, the most enjoyable part of my time as an enlisted Marine was brotherhood. You can always bond with coworkers and spend time at outings, but there is nothing quite comparable to enduring all hardships and benefits with the same people you work and live with everyday. You will build unbreakable relationships with people you meet throughout your service and many will continue to be a part of your life long after you separate or retire from the Marine Corps.
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Pros
Relationships, progressive work environment, streamlined administrative proceces, and opportunity for advancement.
Cons
Short notice for changes in schedule, long hours, not family oriented.
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Extremely motivating, highly stressful in nature, exciting, and very hardworking.
Field Radio Operator (Former Employee) –  Camp Lejeune, NCMarch 25, 2014
The Marine Corps is just like the Army in that there is no typical day. 6:00 am is physical fitness, which is longer and tougher then the Army's, and 8:00 am is the start of work. On days where there are no company exercises going on, my group and i would get out our radio equipment, examine them for broken areas, and then inventory them. Practice drills on setting up the antennas, radios, and wiring would last for nearly the whole day. Time after time these drills would be practiced in order to be the best at what we do. We had over 150 pieces of communication equipment that we had to know, use, and be accountable for.

In preparation for two week and month long skirmishes in the wetlands of our home base in Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, every vehicle would have to be fitted with the proper communications equipment. The amount of vehicles would vary between twelve to eighteen in total and all would have to be triple checked to make sure they are good to go. While out in the field after the initial secured area was chosen and setup with at least one of us there, everybody else in the company would be called in and full communications would be setup in a shelter. The shelter would in turn be wired to all the various artillery vehicles and gunners along with a checkup on wireless communication.

In order to keep a constant flow of communication without breakups, we had to constantly monitor the radios for in-bound messages as well as equipment failure. Paper and pencil were put to great use in writing down information such as the amount of rounds fired, where rounds landed, alerts
  more... for inbound vehicles or people from anywhere, and most importantly incoming fire along with wounded people. The knowledge of what to do in regards to injured personnel were of great importance because of the potential complexity of what has to be sent to their leaders and the medical evacuation team. Writing down and reciprocating over the radio was practiced on a nearly daily basis in order to keep ourselves in perfection.

For the days while on deployment to Africa and Iraq, the procedures of operations would be very much the same with the practices done at home base in Carolina along with incoming fire from enemy forces. It was not uncommon while on guard to call in about suspicious people closing in too much. We constantly had to pack up our equipment and vehicles so that we would become mobile and move to the next location and setup once again. To keep our minds from going crazy, friendships and laughter pave the way. Our bonds were strengthened by what we had gone through and without those guys, life would've been extremely harder in those environments. Just goes to show that teamwork, along with the occasional hard attitudes from some, can go such a long way when combined with the right friendly relationships.
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Pros
confidence builder to the extreme, exhilarating, challenging, and can it be fun.
Cons
extreme over-confident culture, many egos, go to war, and harsh environments.
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Productive and Motivating work place
Administrative Specialist (Former Employee) –  Camp Pendleton, CADecember 26, 2013
I worked in the Permanent Change of Station section. This section of the building helps each Marine who have orders to move to a different duty station.

A typical day of work would be checkin into work, going over the what needs to be done during the day by reading over a checklist and making sure each task on the checklist has been completed. As a supervisor you make sure each Marine you are in charge of is where they need to be. Then you make sure after you check what needs to be done during the day, those Marines know what needs to be done. The usual task that needs to be are printing out web orders, which is a paper that shows all the Marines information and where they are being relocated to. Then you are to type a document which becomes there original orders, those documents are to be carried with the Marine to there next duty station. They cannot check into there next duty station without them. Another task during the day would be making sure that all the proper information and paperwork for the Marines who are coming into the office during that day or the week is all there and properly filled out. Sometimes Marines would like to ask for financial help because they do not have the proper funds to relocate there family. If this is the case we would help each Marine fill out the proper information and papers to receive an advance on funds. Each paper work you submit in order for the funds to be given to the Marine needs to be submitted to another section called disbursing as soon as possible because funding takes time, so it was our job to make sure that information was
  more... taken care of right away.

Another part of the job was making sure that we reported all new information about the Marines into the Marine Corps Total Force System (MCTFS) There would be a special database for this with different transaction codes, because you only had until a certain amount of time to report this information it was important to memorize as many codes as possible and remember them in order. You would have to make sure to report all information in the order of each transaction code of the system would count that transaction as a failure to report.

While doing your duties through out the day you also have Marines coming into the office to as for help. Those Marines were made top priority because they are your customers and customers come first.

Later in my career in the Marines I was placed as a personal assistant for the Director of the building, along with supervising the other Marines who were there to help me with all the task that were being given to me. While doing this job, you would have to make sure to check in with the Director first thing in the morning. During this time you would have a meeting on what he would like to get done during the day. He would set up projects that need to be done on powerpoint or excel and sometimes on Microsoft access and give you a deadline for them, so he could present those projects to his boss. There would be times where he had you write letters and type out certain things on Microsoft word as well. All with these task he had to make sure the building was taken care of, this would mean making sure supplies were ordered for the building, if the landscaped needed to be fixed, we would make sure it was fixed.

I learned a lot while working in each section. I learned that you need to be proficient in the work that you do. Make sure to be organized and priorities everything so that all the really important things get done first. Customer service is very important because you want to make sure that those who are coming in for help are getting the proper information and are being taken care of. Paying attention to detail is a very big key in the work that you do as well. You want to make sure everything is done correctly. Being able to work well with others is very important because have the help of others can help you reach a deadline that you may not be able to do on your own. Its always good to ask for help. If you take care of those you work for they will take care of you.

The hardest part of the job would have to be dealing with other sections. It was difficult because you may have a certain deadline but they may have a different one. There priorities might be different from yours so you have to be able to be flexable and know how to be able to accomplish your task while working with them.

The most enjoyable part of the job is being able to accomplish all task on time and being able to take care of each customer with no problems.
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Pros
housing, benefits, food
Cons
midnight work nights, no over pay
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A chapter in life for growing
ALIMS (Current Employee) –  San Diego, CAJanuary 11, 2016
The Marine Corps is a place that is not for the weak of the faint of heart. There is no real way to discribe the Marine Corps in a short story, or a few short lines. There are only a few constants that you can count on in the Marine Corps, that being, PT at 0600 and chow at 1200. Each day is different, the workload is always changing, and you learn so much it is almost unbeliveable. Normally for work I would get to work at 0730 and begin doing my daily tasks. My job in the Marine Corps is Aviation Logistics Information Management and Support Administration NCOIC (Non-Commissioned Officer In Charge). I am directly responsable for all paperwork, presentations, awards, and publications that go in and out of the office and in the preperation, correcting, and routing of all the above listed. When I am not doing any of the Administration tasks, I am troubleshooting over the phone, helping end users fix their problems with their workstations, working on servers, switches, virtural networks, and physical netwroks to include all of the cableing and configurations. I will have to say that i learned quite a bit during my time in the Marine Corps. The Marine Corps not only teaches you a trade but also teaches you very important life skills as well. The Marine Corps instills Judgement, Justice, Dependability, Integrity, Decisiveness, Tact, Initiative, Endurance, Bearing, Unselfishness, Courage, Knowledge, Loyalty, and Enthusiasm. I am very proud that I joined the Marine Corps, however, I feel that there could be better management. Alot of the decisions that are made on the higherup end that  more... trickles down is not based on a performance or statiscal level, it is made on a personal level; weither or not a person likes you or not. A lot of the leadership will actually make decisions that benifit them versus making a decision that effects the unit as a whole. Another really big issue I feel is in the Marine Corps is that you do not have a voice tword anyone that out ranks you. For example, if a situation arises, and a higher ranking person asks what happened, you are expected to say nothing and anything that you do say, you will be viewed as your lieing about it. I would have to say that is the hardest part of the job, dealing with that and all of the different demands of everyother person around you. My co-works are great. Very easy to get along with, dependable and honest. Honestly, the most enjoyable part of the job is knowing that there is job security. Knowing that you have a job for a set amount of time is a real comfut and an aid all in one because you know that you need to start planning for anything that is going to come up after that pre-determined amount of time.  less
Pros
Free Medical Coverage, Free Dental Coverage, Free Optomitry care. Non Taxable income. Predicable pay. Annual Leave/Vacation
Cons
Everyone that out ranks you, is your boss. Un-predicatble hours. Pointless orders and regulations. No Voice.
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Very fun and intense environment with lots of intelligent, diverse people
Legal Assistance Clerk (Former Employee) –  Beaufort, SCDecember 22, 2014
On a typical work week, I would wake up at 0530 and head over to the PT field. Depending on what kind of exercises we would end up doing, we would either show up at work between 0730 or 0800. Then work started.
When I worked in the Military Justice Section, I would sometimes skip meals to compensate for the work that the office fell behind on. The atmosphere of the work was high tempo-ed and very intense. If you did not meet the deadline of a certain step to prepare for the court, the whole court would be set back for either two to three weeks depending on the availability on the court docket. The people made the Military Justice Section, or as we call it, MOJO, very fun. We would lighten up the whole job process by making jokes with the attorneys or within the clerks.
The hardest part of that job was this one day where everyone had to be at the office by 0530 for this General Court Martial going on. Then from 0530 to 1700, I did not leave the office not even for chow, none of the clerks did. Once 1700 hit, we all went to the convenient store on base and came right back until the court was adjourned at 0130.
When I got moved from the Military Justice Section to the Legal Assistance Section, everything from being high tempo to intense became almost non-existent. The work was still there but not as ridiculously high tempo-ed as MOJO.
As a Legal Assistant Clerk, I worked on both estate planning questionnaires (wills), and legal separations. I sometimes got to be work on some parts of custody hearings. A lot of complexity were inputted in those documents. From my whole entire time
  more... working in Legal Assistance, 2 years, the hardest part of that job was both trying to maintain a very professional office while more paper work and files were to get dropped on your desk as you managed the customer service window as well.
The most enjoyable times in Legal Assistance were the jokes we would make about everything and anything, to lighten the mood of the depressing things we had to see everyday.
The management for both of these sections were amazing, I learned a lot and taught a lot of life and professional lessons to and from my peers.
I also was part of the Augmented Security Team, which got activated only when the threat level rose and or when a calamity, i.e. Typhoons, or Tropical Storms, struck the land. My responsibilities as being part of the A.S.F. team was to make sure no illegal substances, bombs or any foreign and illegal weapons were to be brought on base. I got certified to carry O.C. Spray, retractable baton, handcuffs and 12 gauge shotgun. Whilst going through the training, I also got qualified to become court security during General Courts Martial or high grade Special Courts Martial.
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Pros
free food, free lodging, healthcare, steady paychecks.
Cons
more output meant same income, bad management at company/battalion levels.
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Adventurous and Discovery
Active Duty Corporal of Marines (Former Employee) –  Kaneohe, HIOctober 2, 2014
A regular day at work would be based on what your MOS (Military Occupation Specialty) is; for me it was driving tactical vehicles and conducting reports and maintenance on them.

I've learned alot from this job. Coming in out of high school I was super young and naive about the world and now I have more confidence and realize that if you truly want to be successful in life then you have to work hard and want it. No one cares more about you than yourself.

Management could be tough to deal with if you're not familiar with the military lifestyle. You don't always get treated and talked to the best. The Marine Corps is not for everyone and not so much for the soft hearted if you get offended very easily.

The co-workers that I met... I felt like I've known them my whole life when I've actually only known them for 3 years. Going through struggles together builds camaraderie. All of us arent together anymore but we still stay in touch. You'll meet people that you'll never forget.

The hardest part of this career was being flexible. Sometimes you're gonna be laying in bed sleeping at 3 in the morning and someone is going to come and wake you up saying that you have to go into work because someone needs you too. Being deployed can be hard too. I'm a single guy so it's not so tough for me but if you have family (wife and children) it's gonna be alot tougher. Most people work though it though. I've talked to alot of married men and some say its good for both the wife and husband to spend a little time away from each other.

The most enjoyable part for me was getting to travel... FOR
  more... FREE!
You may not get to go where you want but if you're open-minded you'll really get some enjoyment out of visiting other countries and learning new ways of life. I myself have been to Japan in Okinawa, Tokyo, and I've even hiked Mt. Fuji! I've also been to South Korea as well and would love to go back there again someday. Another enjoyable part was getting stationed in Hawaii. I couldn't have asked for a better place. I'm transitioning out of the Marine Corps soon and I'm from West Virginia but have decided to stay here because this is my new home. Everyday here makes me happy!

I hope maybe reading all of this has inspired/informed you in some way. MAHALO!
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Pros
job security, weekends off mostly, meeting great people and having alot in common with them
Cons
flexibility, deployments
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Everyday something new and exciting.
Canvassing Recruiter (Former Employee) –  Santa Barbara CAFebruary 24, 2014
In recruiting duty there is no typical day, every day was always different. It depended on if we had reached our mission/quota and were able to meet the demands the command or upper management had placed on our team for the month. If we were not at mission then mornings began at 8am with in brief of who we had working to reach mission and if we didn't what was our plan to get there. We stayed no later than 9pm however there were times when it was needed to stay later if we needed to build an enlistment package. If we were at our mission for the month then the morning in brief still started at 8am but we were in no rush to get out of the office. Usually we were done for the day by 2-3pm. What I learned out of recruiting duty is if you work hard as hard as you possibly can for a year straight the next 2 years will be much easier. I learned time management is key. There are simply not enough hours in the day to complete all the tasks required of you if you're not on your game. When it came to management essentially you had your one boss and he/she would leave you alone for the most part with daily updates if you were on your game and, but if you weren't the boss made sure you got there quick and efficiently. My co-workers came from every walk of life. Different personalities, different job training skills. We were a team though. If one person didn't have what was needed to make the mission then someone else would step up and help out. The person who didn't have mission was required not by the boss but by a common courtesy between the team members to make up an extra contract the  more... next month. It kept it fair and even. The hardest part of the job is not dealing with 17-29 year-old, it was their parents. The area I was located at is well known for having money and class and all the parents thought that their kids were destined for college and that's it. The applicants however had a different course for themselves in mind. They wanted to serve their country. They wanted to be apart of the best fighting organization that America has to offer. The Elite of the 4 branches of military. The applicants did listen to a lot of what their parents had to say. Some committed to the Marine Corps and some did not. I don't hold it against those who did not. My personal feeling is that not everyone is cut out mentally or physically to be apart of the Marine Corps. The most enjoyable part of the job was when an applicant would return back from bootcamp no longer as a civilian but as a United States Marine and would come up and shake my hand and tell me "Thank you for all you have done to get me to where I am"  less
Pros
making marines, getting out into the community, guaranteed paycheck, living quarters and meals, serving your country
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Stable work environment with many opportunities for self-improvement
Communication Electronics Technician (Former Employee) –  JPIOctober 11, 2012
A typical day at work consisted of waking up at around 4:30am to hold a formation (meeting) for accountability of all employees before commencing physical training. Upon completion of physical training, we were given time to shower and have breakfast if desired before reporting to our respective shops. I then proceeded to check GCCS-MC, an oracle application, for all work orders that were open and/or current, to ensure that all employees I was in charge of were gainfully employed for the day and that all equipment with an open work order was either being worked on or in a non-workable status (awaiting parts, awaiting evacuation to a higher echelon of maintenance, etc.). I would prepare a list of all tasks for the day and a list of tasks that needed to be accomplished by the end of the work week and assign all these tasks to individual employees. When equipment work orders were completed I would perform Quality Control checks on them to ensure that all standards were met or exceeded so that all customers would be satisfied and there would be no reason to turn them back into maintenance unless negligently used by the operators (customers).

I learned many valuable skills such as time management and efficiency to meet all deadlines, how to troubleshoot, diagnose and repair electronic equipment to the circuit board level, component level if necessary and how to manage subordinates placed under me.

Management changed all to frequently, sometimes there would be one manager for 6 months and sometimes we would have 6 different managers in period of 3 months. Sometimes this caused delays
  more... in maintenance due to one manager wanting to change the Standard Operating Procedures of the last manager and all employees had to learn new routines to meet the new managers expectations.

My co-workers were the same as management. Some of them were there for years while others were shuffled around numerous times. I had some great co-workers at times, and some not-so-great co-workers at other times. I learned to have to adjust and move daily tasks to other employees sometimes due to a level of incompetence in other co-workers. All in all it was a positive experience.

The hardest part of the job was constantly having to change procedures or routines due to the fluctuation of management. The second hardest part of the job was writing and establishing all the Quality Control Procedures to ensure that there was a methodical, standardized process for equipment repair. Once that was completed there was no longer a need to do it again though, and it was no longer a "hard part" of the job.

The most enjoyable part of the job was the hardest part. It was fulfilling to be able to write and implement the new procedures and was also fulfilling to know that as a whole we were flexible as a team no matter who was managing us. I also enjoyed meeting a variety of people and co-workers from all over the country over the 6 years I was employed there.
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Pros
stability, benefits
Cons
occasionally extremely long days (up to full 24 hours), constant change in management
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Very highly structured, demanding, detail oriented workplace.
Lance Corporal/Engineer Equipment Repair (Current Employee) –  Brooklyn, NYJanuary 6, 2015
A typical day begins on Saturday at 6am with an accountability muster to ensure all personnel are accounted for. After this muster we begin preforming limited technical inspections on all of the military vehicles in our motor pool to ensure their operational readiness. We generally work through 1:30 pm where we take lunch for an hour. Afterwards, we are assigned various administrative tasks and professional military education courses. Our day generally ends at 8pm. We come in Sunday morning at 6am and repeat the same routine. Since I am in the reserves, this is done once a month, always on a weekend.

I have learned how to operate both independantly and as part of a team in a more efficient manner than I did previously. I also learned how to manage my time in order to complete essential tasks assigned to us. I have been placed in leadership roles as well as roles where I follow another leader; I have excelled at both. Our leaders and managers are excellent at their job and provide us with a "leadership by example" method of management. My co workers are highly mortivated and shoulder the burden of the work equally without breaking under pressure or failing to uphold their share of the workload.

The long hours on our feet standing outside in the cold working on the vehicles make this job difficult. In addition, the amount of work we must accomplish within strict timeframes often seems overwhelming. However, we alway accomplish our mission and achieve the best results. At the end of our drill period, we recieve the praises and appreciation of our commanding officer. The most
  more... enjoyable portion of this job is the fact that we are constantly learning new skills and techniques and constantly improving our ability to function as leaders. The Marine Corps prides itself on decentralized leadership and this allows us all to gain much experience as leaders. We can take these skills, apply them to any career in the civilian world, and excel past our peers who may not have this same training and experience. Due to our motto of "one team, one effort" we also excel as members of a team whose goal is to accomplish a common task.  less
Pros
leadership experience, long lunch break, demanding, high friction enviroment
Cons
12+ hour work days, strict time constraints to accomplish given tasks
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An organization that develops individuals personally and professionally.
Administrative Instructor/Equipment Manager (Former Employee) –  Oceanside, CAApril 16, 2014
Being a United States Marine was one of the best things that has ever happened to me. It has aided me to grow on so many levels and teaches the importance of working as a team.

A typical day at work may vary, but usually consists of performing low level preventive maintenance on heavy equipment, operating load lifting equipment such as cranes, forklifts, and container handlers in support of logistical operations. There is always administrative requirements that go hand and hand with the job, and as I've climbed the ladder of success I assumed more of a managerial role consisting of organizing planned maintenance on equipment, managing dispatch logs and records, and ensure the quality standards are met in conjunction with technical manuals.

I have learned the importance of hard work and how to accomplish tasks in a timely manner in order meet deadlines. I've learned the importance of caring for your fellow employees and how lifting one another up can lead to increased productivity for one's company. I have literally given the shirt off of my back for one of my fellow employees.

Management can vary, because of relocation or re-assigment but overall the managers are familiar with the operations and logistical requirements that go into accomplishing tasks and assign jobs to personnel accordingly. The managers pass along what they know to their subordinates and afford them the opportunity to take charge in certain situations in order to familiarize themselves with the logistics that go into upper level management.

Co-workers may not always see eye to eye, however they never let
  more... their personal differences interfere with the fact that a job must get done in a timely manner. Overall, you can meet some of the best co-workers you've ever met in your life in the U.S. Marine Corps.

The most difficult part of the job is being tasked with assigments that you've never done before or have no clue how to do, yet it ties into one of the best parts of the job because one is truly tested and realizes their true potential by overcoming adversity and developing a network in the process. The most enjoyable part of the job is the self satisfaction you receive for a job well done because you attain so much experience along the way to take along with you onto the next assigment.
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Pros
self-satisfaction of a job well done, opportunities to lead, networking, familiarization with logistics.
Cons
long hours, eating on the go, time away from familiy.
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Deploy with the best. You will be grateful you did once you have your first joint forces exercise with the rest.
E-5 / SGT (Former Employee) –  Jacksonville NC.May 27, 2014
You want to guarantee yourself the best Leadership, Training, and best chance of survival in combat then look no further.
Things to remember.
1) Its a Rifle... Not a Gun
2) A DUI will get you the electric chair
3) Its an Ink Stick... Not a Pen
4) We are not the Army. So you don't wear your utility uniform to church while on boot leave, you don't get fat, you don't salute indoors unless your wearing a cover, you don't wear a cover indoors unless on duty.
5) By the way its a cover... not a hat.
6) It goes on your Grape... not your head. The head is where you make number 1 in a cup for your SACO (Substance Abuse Control Officer) after returning from a 96.
7) 96 is a 4 day weekend and they are your new best friend. aka free leave. 72 is a 3 day and for some reason no where near as exciting... not sure why.
8) Prior to anytime you get 3 or more consecutive days off for any occasion you can about guarantee that you and all the rest of the leathernecks in your Battalion or Squadron will be piled into the base movie theater for a "Safety Brief" or "Safety Stand Down". This is basically 4+ hours of STD education from a Navy Corpsman that drew the short straw and would rather be shot in the face than leading that briefing. WARNING!!! About an hour consists of slides showcasing some of the worst looking Genitalia ever captured on film and all of it will be badly riddled with every type of infestation imaginable. I recommend not eating till after its over.

That's pretty much the important stuff. The rest you can figure out on your own. Semper FI!

Sgt. Hobbs
Pros
free food, free room and board, world travel, proud history and culture, best leadership, friendly drill instructors, relaxing recruit training program at 1 of 2 exotic locations, plenty of ammo
Cons
no hair, ugly woman, random long walks with everything you own and some other stuff on your back
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Memorable experience
Corporal (Former Employee) –  Cherry Point, NCFebruary 18, 2015
-We would wake up and do our morning PT (physical training) and then go to our respective radio shops. We would inventory our radio gear once a month, or as many times as needed, and induct broken gear to the maintenance shop. Typically, a 1 hour lunch break was given and upon return, we'd complete any tasks given by our superiors. Everyday was different in the sense we couldn't plan ahead.
-I learned a variety of skills. I learned how to use a variety of radio equipment, encrypted devices, an M16 A-4 service rifle, and martial arts designed by the Marine Corps. Most importantly, I learned the value of leadership, both good and bad, and how to improve on a daily basis.
-We had a rank structure. E-1 (private) to E-9 (sergeant major) and O-1 (2nd lieutenant) to O-10 (general). The E is for enlisted and O is for officer. This structure was the best way to work and conduct business because you only dealt with your pay grade who were often your peers.
-My co-workers were the best group of men and women I've known to this date. All were hard working, had a sense of humor, embraced negative situations, and had a common trait.
-The hardest part about the job would probably have to be staying motivated in tough times. There were times where you and your Marines are tasked with doing a task over and over again for what seems to be for no reason. One person can easily become distraught when this happens and it spreads through the platoon and even company.
-The best part about the job was the people and experiences you get to have. I've made great friends, seen some cool places, gotten
  more... the best training, learned a lot about communication, and above all, the camaraderie is something you can't explain. Best job I've had so far.  less
Pros
health care benefits, payed vacation, promotions, living quarters, life experience
Cons
long days for no apparent reason, fraternization, political, injustices often take place
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Experience that is diverse in technical and logistics that widens and expands as career moves forward.
Communications Systems Project Manager (Former Employee) –  Camp Lejeune, NC; 29 Palms, CA; Norfolk, VAAugust 22, 2012
Life in the Marine Corps can be broken down into projects. From routine field exercises to minor and major deployments, each demands a degree of operational and logistic planning that encompasses equipment knowledge, its maintenance, and its limitations and capabilities. Planning also involves personnel which encompasses welfare, movement and knowledge of individual talents. A typical work day caters to the aforementioned through continual training and preparation.

Leadership and management are learned young in the Marine Corps. One's first tast of leadership comes with the Corporal rank (junior NCO). From here and through promotions, the leadership and management skills blossom and assume more roles and responsibilities. What also grows is technical knowledge. What a junior Marine starts out as eventually grows into a wider aspect of the discipline. For example; a Field Wireman who lays cable and installs switchboards will one day grow beyond and develop plans that interfaces tactical and commercial switchboards, routers and servers, multiple types of radios, TDM and ATM mulitplexers, and microwave or satellite transmission pieces.

Of course, it is demanding. Physical Fitness is a must and exercises/deployment often have to take priority over family (3 daughters - missed the birth of 2). Continually keeping up with the latest technological advances, especially in the communications field, can also be time consuming. However, such is the life in the Marines. Without it, I would not have been to multiple countries spanning from Europe to Africa through the Middle East and onto
  more... Asia. It has definately given me worldy experience and introduced me to a wider world of cultures. My career in the U.S. Marine Corps has prepared me to be a highly flexible person with an ability to handle pressure with ease. My technical knowledge is diverse and leadership abilities is sound. This allows me to persue mulitple positions in the civilian world.  less
Pros
travel, adventure, stable pay, government holiday routines, health care and retirement benefits, education assistance, & team/family work environment
Cons
rate of deployment, physically demanding on body
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Marine Corps
Tactical Air Defense Technician (Former Employee) –  Cherry Point, NCOctober 1, 2014
Accomplished U.S. Marine with five years experience of increasingly higher leadership and management responsibilities ready to transfer versatile skills and specialized training. Proven success at project and operational management, staff management, and recruitment, training, and mentorship.

Served guard duty and acted as security detail many times while serving in the Marine Corps, both in the States and while deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

Skills

• Prepared and submitted operation reports, forms, and logs
• Created a stable warranty program for Marine Air Control Group Twenty Eight, saving over $50,000.00 of unit spending within a six month time span
• Provided leadership and guidance to 14 Marines regarding personal and family issues while deployed in Afghanistan
• Completed a daily report of all equipment statuses, recording all maintenance completed as well as up to date statuses and current capabilities

Education

• Associates of Applied Arts in Motion Picture Production from KD College Conservatory of Film and Dramatic Arts (2013-2014)
• Received the award of honor graduate due scoring above the competition on tests and assignments during two courses at the Marine Corps Communication and Electronic School (2008-2009)

Leadership Activities

• Appointed Class Non-Commissioned Officer as Private First Class and Lance Corporal for one year while attending courses at MCCES in recognition for high levels of physical fitness and an exceptional work ethic
• Maintained and accounted for over $55,350,000 worth of equipment and supervised and lead over
  more... 600 Marines.
• Served as Platoon Sergeant for four years at various duty stations and multiple field operations
• Prepared embarkation of equipment for multiple deployments with gear worth over $40,000,000

Volunteer Activities

• Participated in the Young Marine Program for six months, planning events for young children, both military dependents and civilians, to promote mental and physical strength
• Hosted five Marine family days at Marine Air Squarden 2, teaching Marine families the Squarden functions and stressing the importance of the Marine in their family to the Marine Corps and the United States
• Participated in three student orientations at KD College, heading the photography section for student identification cards
• Volunteered for three industry nights while attending KD College, responsible for set up, greeting of guests, and tear down
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United States Marine Corps Aviation
Waste Manager (Current Employee) –  Fort Dix NJJuly 14, 2014
-The typical work day starts with accounting for your Marines by submitting a daily report and preparing the shop prior to determining the daily priorities. This includes accounting for all tools, performing pre operational check for equipments, and performing hydraulic sampling for any ground support equipment.
-Attend a daily meeting to communicate priorities, aircraft statuses and pass any pertinent information about training, or or other information.
- The rest of the day revolves around the aircraft maintenance and establishes the operational tempo for the work center, this includes delegating task, supervising employees, and teaching in experienced personnel.
- The Marine Corps is a great organization the has many opportunities for learning, with many different schools, however the most important aspect i learned is how to communicate with other, manage shops, maintenance, and personnel.
-The hardest part of management is getting someone to do something not because you want them to, but because they want to do it especially because of their respect and loyalty to their leader.
-The hazardous material management consist of conducing inventories, safety inspections, training of personnel, developing procedures, filing reports, complying with laws and regulations, communicating with the host hazmat center, and establishing an overall safe environment to use the hazardous materials, and control waste.
- Management is a large portion of Marine Corps aviations that is driven by Non commissioned officers and solely relies on that person. The success of the squadron heavily weights
  more... on the supervision of employees to ensure the maintenance is completed correctly the first time.
- The co-workers vary from the newly joined marines to the senior personnel with 20 plus years on the job. The chain of command is used at all times, however qualification, experience, and work ethic also reflect the way individuals are treated. Respect is earned not given.
- The hardest part of the job is limited assets due to budget cuts, and man power limitations also due to sequestration.
- The most enjoyable part of the job is working with other Marines, to include all Marines from all over the US that gives you an opportunity to learn about vast cultures and different walks of life.
- I also enjoy teaching, personnel about the aircraft, and hazmat as i honestly believe it is pertinent in protecting the environment.
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Pros
endless learning, and room for growth
Cons
limited family life, due to deployments and detachments
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4.6
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