UPS

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UPS Employee Reviews

What people are saying about UPS

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Worst job ever. At UPS, "brown" stands for how they treat their employees...
Warehouse Worker (Current Employee) –  Shrewsbury, MAJanuary 30, 2015
Oh boy! Where to begin?! UPS treats their employees, um, very badly. Management is trained to harass you all day long and scream at you to go faster. Meanwhile, they let some people go home early on the same job because they wanted to save money. They see nothing wrong with expecting you to do the work of more than one person.

The mindset from the top down is very childish. Coworkers are very catty and play petty games that are really annoying and disruptive.

Management will use any excuse to intimidate you, belittle you, yell at you and will call you into the office for stupid things they make up. They will threaten to give you a warning letter or terminate you over and over. I have gotten Warning Letters for things I didn't even do. They are constantly bringing people into the office all day long for these "meetings." It is a colossal waste of everyone's time, and then they complain that their productivity numbers are off. They have every kind of dirty trick that you can think of. They fill your personnel file with all kinds of bogus information. The whole operation is VERY dysfunctional.

Don't expect the union to support you either. They effectively represent the company and will not raise a finger to help you when management plays their games.

They want us to unload trucks at the rate of 1,000 pieces an hour which is not humanly possible. The bulk packages can be extremely heavy. You have to be careful and look out for your safety or you will get injured. They will push you as hard as they can. They will drive you into the ground if you let them. I know of one fellow
  more... who died on the job, literally, last year after working a full shift in oppressively hot conditions and management says "oh, well, he had an underlying health problem." Another was criticized for taking time to attend his mother's funeral. Another fellow developed seizures, so he was fired. They fire people left and right. Sometimes they will fire you and then bring you back 3 weeks later. It is a game they play. You might have to wait 6 months. They like to hold that threat over your head. It is unbelievable.

You work really hard on your feet and then you get a whopping 10 minute break, but 2 min of that includes a mandatory meeting, so by the time you get somewhere you can sit down, you have to get back up again and get to your work station.

If you are considering a job at UPS, think VERY carefully! Save yourself A LOT of grief. I don't know of ANY hubs that treat their employees well. I read some of the other reviews that are super positive and I don't know where these people are coming from. It is not the UPS I know. I have been with the company for over 20 years. I am hanging on for retirement which should be soon. They are trying to find an excuse to fire me so that they won't have to pay my pension until I turn 64.

It is a thankless, miserable job that has caused me so many problems. If I had to do it all over again, I would never have worked for UPS. Twenty years ago, it was great. Not now. Not by a long shot. I don't know how I have made it this long. New hires chat with me and ask me how long I have been with the company and I tell them 20+ years. They look at me astonished and ask me HOW I did it. I tell them: Don't plan to stick around. I have seen senior coworkers receive their 20, 25, or 30-year service plaques from management and turn around and dump them in the trash right there. Yup. That says it all.
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Pros
leaving at the end of my shift
Cons
management is abusive, union reps and stewards are corrupt and support the employer, hostile work environment, need permission to use the bathroom, short breaks, will work you to death if you let them, ...and then step over your dead body, ...to declare you're fired for "stealing time" from the company, ....by laying on the floor
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Hard but fun and rewarding
Driver Helper (Former Employee) –  Englewood, COApril 13, 2014
I worked with UPS as a Driver Helper this past holiday season, and it was everything I had hoped for and more.

First off, your typical day as a driver helper can range from pretty simple to complicated.

You'll be called by either a coordinator from the center you're working out of, or a driver, and told when and where to meet your driver for that day. Most of the time you will be paired with the same driver, but as the season progresses, you could end up with someone else, and even be with multiple drivers in one day! I myself have had 2 different drivers on 2 separate occasions.

Your responsibilities as a helper look like one thing on paper, but may vary depending on what your driver(s) ask you to do. You won't have much contact with management, so they are your bosses. Typically, you'll be running packages to their destinations and operating the DIAD. Meanwhile, your driver will either run another package to a home or business nearby or, more likely, stay on the truck and sort/organize the packages in back. In some cases, or with some drivers, you may be asked to be the one to sort and organize the packages.

The work itself is simple but hard. The most complex part of the job is learning to operate the DIAD quickly and accurately. The hard work is actually handling and delivering packages, especially large and/or heavy ones. In the course of your work, you'll have to abide by the company's safety guidelines while manuevering around yard hazards, stairs, etc., and making your way back to the truck.

This is an EXTREMELY physical job, and if you're not in shape when you
  more... start it, you will be when you finish. Especially if you get a route with a lot of apartments.

As mentioned before, you don't get into contact with management very much. Occasionally a manager will ambush you out on the route, just to make sure you're following safety guidelines and working. This only happened to me twice, otherwise the closest contact I had with what might be called "management" was speaking with the coordinators in the morning when they called me.

Co-workers were great. I've got nothing bad to say about the drivers I was with. Some were a bit strict, but this is a time-sensitive job. You have to bring your A-game every day.

I loved working with UPS. I loved the drivers, I loved the customers, the wages weren't bad, and I loved the hours I got. It taught me more about myself and my own resilience than I could have learned at my previous job, and that knowledge will aid me greatly in searching for a new job as I am now more familiar with my limits than I ever could have been before.

RATINGS:
Work/Life Balance: 4/5
-This is a seasonal position that may require part time or full time hours depending on the needs of the company. You could have days where you're on the truck for 10-11 hours (I had at least one 11 hour day).
Compensation/Benefits: 4/5
-For a seasonal position, what they paid me was pretty good. Getting a 40-minute break on longer days, and being able to bring snacks along for the ride is great too. It's hard to ask for more in a seasonal job.
Job Security/Advancement: 1/5
-This is a seasonal job. There is no security; you will work only as needed by the company. No possibility of getting on part-time or otherwise--you have to reapply after the peak season.
Management: 4/5
-Everything is coordinated beautifully and the few times there was a mix up, it got straightened out very quickly.
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Pros
good pay, 40-min break, very physical or active, great co-workers
Cons
apartments, you feel rushed sometimes, management can be intimidating but they're just looking out for the company
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Auditor - Good starting labor job
Revenue Recovery Auditor (Current Employee) –  Harvey, ILOctober 23, 2015
At the point of writing this review, I have been employed with UPS as a Revenue Recovery Auditor for roughly 3 years. This job was the first one I ever had, so this is from the view of someone who otherwise has no other job experience.

We auditors are allowed relative freedom on the job, so my viewpoint may not be indicative of the company as a whole. I come into work every day at about 4:30 and begin work immediately, usually weighing and measuring boxes for price accuracy as my job entails. It's easier to do weighing and measuring inside the UPS trucks (which come in from their routes anywhere from 4:00pm to 9:00pm), but once the belt starts, I must set up a personal work area in which to pull and suspicious boxes off of the belt. Boxes can weigh anywhere from 1 to 100 lbs or be as long as 110 inches, though, they're typically no bigger than 40 lbs and no longer/wider than 20 inches or smaller. Boxes come down the belt fast, so you must remain organized and always be thinking of your next move while initiating your current one.

Management is fine, usually un-intrusive, though they will notify you if you're not working safely. They also tend to move you around a lot. Being an auditor, i didn't suffer this much, but loaders, unloaders and small sort workers would typically do any and every job in the building if the supervisors need a spot filled.

Co-workers are fine. I've had a couple less-than-great encounters with a rather prideful individual who didn't like me touching the boxes before he unloaded him, but otherwise, they're generally friendly. UPS, being as open
  more... to applicants as they are, attracts all kinds, however. If you're not use to loudmouths/the outspoken, you may be in for culture shock. However, despite that, no one really "gets in your face" and co-workers are always willing to help a newblood out.

Hardest part of the job is keeping the work area as tidy as you can. Job can be fast paced, and you're constantly scanning boxes, and sometimes you don't have time to organize them neatly, which can lead to what's called "egress issues" (a fancy term for "fire hazard"). Also, equipment can be scarce, so if there aren't enough tools (usually scanners) to go around, you may get stuck either doing a job you aren't payed for or getting sent home. UPSs are also generally filthy workplaces, as are most labor jobs, so don't bring your best clothes. Also, you'll have to remember to prepare yourself for harsh cold or blisteringly hot weather. My facility was smaller than most, so it was essentially one big garage, with there being little difference between being inside or outside of the building.

As I stated before, there's a fair bit of freedom. You need to work fast, but never feel like you're being OVER worked. You're free to go at your own pace, granted you're being productive at all times. Health benefits are among the best you can get, general and dental insurance with low deductibles. Local or small sort positions are part time, so it's good for students, especially since there's a program in place that helps pay for college. However, if you ever want to increase your wages, you either have to become a supervisor or a driver. Full-time in-house positions are scarce and usually go to the person with the most seniority. You're also not allowed to double shift, which blows my mind, but whatever.
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Pros
consistent hours, easy to move up, relatively free work environment, great healthcare
Cons
tiresome, at-times iffy management, loud, generally understaffed
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productive work environment, factory
Preloader (Former Employee) –  Virginia Beach, VAJanuary 15, 2014
Well, a typical work day for UPS started around one am in the morning long after the sun had been down and the stars burned bright and I would sleep all day just to get into the right set of mind for the long, laborious hours that awaited me. I would drive there, park my car, walk to the factory in between the yellow walk path and you must walk on that yellow walk path otherwise you'll get fired or run over by a eighteen-wheeling semi-truck containing loads and loads of boxes which make the truck weigh even more to make it that much easier to turn your bones into dust when you got squished. Thank God no one got squished when I worked there, but I've heard stories. Then I would walk into the factory and the fun began. Noise. Loud noise, everywhere. Beeping noises. Gaunt, grunting, breaded, red-eyed figures talking about last night's football game, who won, who lost money. Just union workers standing around drinking a cup o' joe waiting for the typical (and always you must go) health meetings before the work day started.
So I learned some things at those health meetings like never drink energy drinks during the summer season because you'll have a heart attack or heat stroke and it's happened before I was told, stay away from that rotten stuff and always drink water to ease the muscles. Always stay hydrated. Now as pre-loader and just beginning and starting out in this union business I was stuck at the bottom of the barrel, naturally. I knew this was going to happen. I accepted it and continued my fate with the company. I met good bright people that worked beside me and I've also
  more... met dim-witted retards that you could call the management who watched over us. Some people were good humored, others not so much but sometimes they had a good day and enjoyed a laugh here and there. Anything to take your mind off the same movement and action you've been doing now for eight hours sometimes ten. Now as the pre-loader gig went I would stand in this one spot with another co-worker to help me and these big white bags maybe four feet wide five feet in height filled with boxes sometimes heavy lottery tickets would mosey on down the conveyer belt line and sometimes the bags would avalanche over each other or got stuck and you had rip them away with all your might while hands aching to the point of no return and no kidding, I couldn't even turn a door handle, or wipe my rear end. Well, I could, and did, but didn't enjoy it through that pain I would feel opening and unzipping and dumping and repeating and repeating and repeating. My back almost went out being careless by not bending with the ol' achy knees one time. And the musty dusty air that I would be breathing in the whole time did not set well with my allergies. I would walk out after a hard mornings labor to the bright rising sun burning yellowish-white and drive to the nearest Wawa to get some food or a coffee or pack of smokes and the next thing I know I have a random stranger telling me I have black soot-like stuff seeping from my nostrils. So I would wipe it off all embarrassed like and pay for whatever I had to pay for. Now don't get me wrong the pay was all worth the work. UPS treated there employees royally when it came to the funding of paychecks. They pay every week too. I would pay my car insurance, give the folks some rent money, and still have some scratch for long lost nights in downtown Norfolk or New York City. - R. Howard  less
Pros
paid well
Cons
bathroom breaks only
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A place where you feel alive and joyful
PT Operations Manager (Former Employee) –  Longview, TXOctober 23, 2013
A typical day at ups is where you:
• Prepare and review operational reports and schedules to ensure accuracy and efficiency.
• Resolve problems concerning transportation, logistics systems, imports or exports, or customer issues.
• Maintain metrics, reports, process documentation, customer service logs, or training or safety records.
• Direct inbound or outbound logistics operations, such as transportation or warehouse activities, safety performance and logistics quality management.
• Analyze internal processes and recommend and implement procedural or policy changes to improve operations, such as supply changes or the disposal of records.
• Plan, administer and control budgets for contracts, equipment and supplies.
• Direct or coordinate the supportive services department
What I have learned?
At our local UPS facility we view success in terms of fulfillment and gratification – not just promotions and money. Sure everyone wants to be promoted. Everyone wants to earn more.
I definitely feel that way too… but somewhere along the way my job has come to mean a lot more to me than just a paycheck. And if you left this job, even if for a lot higher salary… you would still miss it
At our facility You leave work with items on your to-do list because you’re excited about tackling the opportunities tomorrow.
Many people cross the “fun” tasks off their to-do lists within the first hour or two.
At my location, i see my manager as a person iWork with, not for. I feel valued. I feel respected. I feel trusted. I don’t think about surviving another day, I think about winning. I don't worry
  more... much about losing my job. I am more worried about not achieving my potential. Not being as impactful as i can especially given all the tools and resources available to me.
Job Satisfaction
At my local UPS facility you enjoy attending meetings because it’s fun to be at the center of thoughtful, challenging discussions that lead to decisions, initiatives, and changes – changes you get to be a part of.
At my local UPS facility you don't worry much about losing your job. You're more worried about not achieving your potential. Not being as impactful as you can.
You often have cool stuff at my job – new initiatives, side projects, hunches you want to confirm with data, people you want to talk to – left over when it’s time to go home.
The favorite parts of my job include the ability to work independently (trust from employers) & the people I work with. It’s great to work with people that care about their company and doing a good job. It’s hard to find that environment today because so many people just don’t care about honesty, hard work & integrity.
Connecting the dots
I love Logistics Finance and Analysis – the cost analyst parts of my job allow me to pour over data (what is) and see patterns and opportunities for improvement (what can/should be). I don’t think there’s anything more satisfying than solving the puzzle and then using the solution to increase efficiency.
Coworkers
I like seeing my employer and colleagues succeed, so it’s second nature to help out and do my best without reservations. We all pitch in automatically- Assist each other as a team without hesitation
It is a place where you feel alive and joyful
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Pros
chance to develop effective processes and directing complex logistics functions for customers
Cons
not enough time in the day
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Terrible First Job
Package Handler (Former Employee) –  Hodgkins, ILMay 6, 2015
For anyone who would like to know whether UPS is a good start up job, the answer is somewhat but not quite. Yes UPS pays on a weekly basis and the average pay for new employees is around $110 maybe $130 on a good week. However if your struggling and just looking for any job UPS is the place mainly because they will gladly hire anyone. On the same token UPS package handler employees have the most work to do year round and the lowest payout. Package handlers are honestly the most important line of workers, despite the fact that they do not receive any official uniform. The most package handlers get is a small UPS badge after 4-6 months. Pay raises happen about every 6 months as well maybe a few dollars more. I happened to work the worst shift. In the Night Sort I worked from 10pm-3am, not terrible hours, but I'm sure you could imagine how irritated and tired you could be. I wont throw all of the staff and management under the bus, however my personal supervisors were terrible. If you planned on going to work and doing a half assed job loading and unloading extremely heavy freight then i actually recommend this job to you. However if you are naturally a hard worker who will put in the most effort you possibly can to get the job done, it is sad to say that you will be abused and over worked. On paper the end of my shift was 3:00 am. I never was able to actually leave on time because someone would always beg me to stay or stay until 4-5 am, even though I took the bus to work. There were even instances where it had been 20-30 minutes past 3:00 am and other employees were allowed to  more... leave. (No exaggeration) I actually watched other new employees leave on time and because I took my job more seriously my boss constantly tried to force me to stay. My supervisor would even go as far as waiting until its 2:55 am to go into my trailer and give me a new time consuming task. My boss even walked to the bus area to harass employees, which I believe is against the rules in the UPS handbook, My boss even found out the exact time my bus left which was 3:50 meaning I personally would never leave at 3 am ever again. Mind you at 3 am the last thing i want to do is have a argument with anyone, by the end of the night I would be sweaty,dirty,dusty, and honestly exhausted. I hardly ever went home on time and I missed my bus all the time. I even had a incident where it was 3:20 and I approached my boss who was standing at the card swipe desk could I leave after watching plenty of other people swipe out. My boss denied my permission to leave and at the moment I felt I was being treated unfairly. I told him politely I'm still leaving and as I went to swipe my card he places his hand over the swipe so I couldn't clock out and I had to physically move him to do so. Shortly after he threatened to fire me, however I wasn't fired. Although ever since that day the management began hiding the clock out cards from the employees so that we would have no choice but to wait til a supervisor walks in or trailer and discretely hands us our cards one by one. Long story short UPS will hire anyone its just not the best job to have at all.I have worked a other warehouse facilities that pay triple what UPS does with half the labor.  less
Pros
Communication Skills, Union
Cons
Work in all weather conditions, Disrespectful Staff Members (May Vary), Hard work goes unrewarded
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Ok place to work for students
Package Handler (Former Employee) –  Pontiac, MIMay 16, 2013
This is an ok place to work if you are a student and only trying to save some money during school. Only work maybe 15-20 hours per week (Monday-Friday) with no weekends and you get paid $115 weekly (however, the first of the month checks will be shorter because of monthly dues) and the package handlers are on an on-call basis only.

A typical day during the evening shift (6 p.m.-8:30 p.m.) at this branch is as soon as you arrive everyone waits in the managers office before going to their stations (I was a loader/unloader). The typical shift lasts about 2.5-3 hours (or until the semi-trucks are full). When the belt starts, for un-loaders they typically have to unload all of the brown trucks as fast as possible. Management at this branch usually wants each truck done within 5-8 minutes or they will begin to say something negative. If you go to slow co-workers will get mad because the faster the brown trucks are unloaded the faster the shift is over. As a loader, I was in the back of a semi and had to load it at a rate of about 300-500 packages per hour on average or until the truck was completely full (except Fridays since those are usually the lightest days and Mondays are the heaviest during the summer months). For holidays such as Christmas that package count WILL double.

The hardest part about this job is the HEAT in the factory and you only get a 10 minute break. Water breaks are few and far between especially while in the semi-trucks because their are no water fountains near the truck ports and you must stay in that enclosed space for the entire shift (except breaks). While
  more... unloading the brown trucks that can be a bit better since you can take second to feel a cool breeze from outside and the mist from the truck washers washing the trucks as you unload them. The pace is also very tiring since it is a factory and the belts only stop if there is a problem. I suggest bring a very large water bottle during the shift. Another hard part of this job is that the branch is full of dust and mosquitoes so if you have bad allergies do not apply because you will be very miserable and make sure to have plenty of bug spray. Also, they do not offer gloves or facial masks at this branch so you have to purchase your own.

The most enjoyable part of the job is that if you work hard you will lose weight (I lost 30lbs in 3 months before I went back to school) and you will get plenty of exercise. Advancement can happen as fast as 1-4 years of working as a package handler, and after 2 years eligibility opens to become a driver. Also, you could be asked to work in another station as soon as 3-6 months. Mostly the trucks here are loaded and unloaded by individuals between the ages of 18-30 years old and the other stations are done by usually older individuals or the most experienced. Job security is excellent as well if you are a hard worker because there is such a high turnover rate.
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Pros
lose weight, get paid weekly, early advancement within company, easy company to get into with no experience
Cons
very short breaks, must buy own materials, lifting packages anywhere from 5 lbs. to 200 lbs. or more, no water fountains near stations
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Terrible place to work.
Package Handler (Former Employee) –  Hodgkins illinois CACHNovember 19, 2013
-Full time workload in a part time shift for 8.50/hr for first 40 days then $9 an hour afterwards for a year
-Management will lie to you repeatedly if they feel they can get more work out of you
-Rules only exist until management decides they want to break them
-You are expected to never lie
-Most who people work there are ego-tripping jerks
-They will go to extreme lengths to make sure that if you get hurt, you will be the one at fault and not them (they run a huge "safety" program to get reduced premiums from their insurance company and try to pass it off like they care about you
-If you work hard you will be abused by management allowing other workers to slack off while you do their work as well
-The union is WEAK. UPS management is so in bed with the teamsters union that alot of higher up managers go out to dinner/golfing/vacations/etc. with Teamster business agents
-They do offer money for school but its only $2000 a semester with a life time cap of $16000, which is nice for maybe 2 years at a community college. So even though it is offered only about a quarter of what is offered is actually usable
-In order to go full-time you will probably have to wait 14+ years
-They do not respect the fact you only work for them part-time and cannot afford to live on just your wage there. I myself have been threatened with "job abandonment" if I do not stay AFTER THE END OF MY SHIFT to help clean up the gigantic mess that is left at the end of the day to go to another job. Over the course of a year UPS got me fired from 3 different jobs which all started atleast an hour after my shift
  more... at UPS was supposed to end. I only stayed there because the benefits are GREAT but benefits dont pay the bills. It took me 5 years to realize that.
-To meet their numbers dock supervisors will intentionally forget your hours and pay you ALOT less than what you are supposed to be payed, you can appeal it but it takes several weeks and it gets done by the full-time supervisor who is usually the one who told the dock supervisor to cut your hours in the first place.
-I was expected to load 2000+ packages an hour for 5 hours a day plus picking up the 1000's of over 70lb packages which they let pile up next to your trailer all day.

This is a terrible company that will lie to you and abuse you. A co-worker of mine asked to go home once, he said he wasn't feeling well. My full-time supervisor told him sure he could go, if he wouldnt mind looking for a new job tomorrow. Well my coworker stayed, finished his shift and got to the guard shack. He suffered a major heart attack and died about 5 feet infront of me. All because some A**HOLE on a power-trip wanted to keep his own numbers up.

DO NOT WORK HERE (UPS IN HODGKINS ILLIONS, CACH) YOU WILL SUFFER MULTIPLE INJURIES AND YOU WILL DO PERMANENT DAMAGE TO YOUR BODY THAT YOU MIGHT NOT NOTICE UNTIL IT IS TOO LATE AND UPS IS NO LONGER LIABLE FOR. THE BENEFITS ARE GREAT DONT GET ME WRONG BUT YOU DONT NEED THEM THAT BAD TRUST ME.

Oh and one last thing, I worked there for 5 years and never once hit $12000 a year. Just let that sink in.
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Cons
the pay, people, management, workload, hours all suck
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The best dead end job you'll ever have.
Front Line / Part-Time Supervisor (Current Employee) –  I'll just say IllinoisJune 16, 2014
I'm 15 year veteran of Big Brown and worked for the union and management. This is what I know...

In order to go forth and prosper in this company, you must accept belittlement, be part of the proper social circle and be willing to set integrity aside for better numbers. In fact, they will expect you to commit to unrealistic expectations. If you don't commit, you're not a team player. If you do and don't make it, you're not dependable. This 'abuse' happens because founder Jim Casey uttered the words 'remain constructively dis-satisfied'. I like the essence of this phrase. These people have abused it expecting blood from stones.

This is not what they will sell to you.

They will sell 'community' and 'service'. As long as you make your numbers. Lay people off wantonly, send hourly people home so a supervisor can do their job as to not have the reported man hours (meaning you look more productive than you really are) and pencil whip paper work. Dear GOD the paperwork. Lots of overlapping and redundant paperwork so IF there is an issue, the upper management has plausible deniability AND the super who signed off is now painted themselves into a corner. 'We'll give you the opportunity to resign' has been spoken more than once and over little mistakes.

IF you are not willing to play by these rules, you wont get past part-time supervisor. IF you want to do it 'the right way' you will be passed up or seen as not committed to the management team. Thus becoming a dead-end job.

If you're hourly and working for big brown, every injury is your fault. You may still get workman's comp. blah
  more... blah blah, but its NEVER because the job is unsafe. Its because you worked unsafe.

If you're management, watch you back. There are a lot of spotlight rangers that will go out of their way to show your mistake to make themselves look better.

Also note, they push United Way on their people to the point of harassment, and for the management IT IS harassment.

With all this said, there are bright spots. Earn and Learn can help pay for college. Its a decent resume builder if you're management. If you can wait around on the hourly side of the house the full-time union people make bank. (waiting list is usually 2-15 years, depending on the building location.) The company has a good deal of vacation time when starting and it gets much better as you stay. (not that you can use it during Thanksgiving or Christmas...)

I know this has come across as demonization, but what I'm trying to iterate is be informed. This isn't an ALL BAD company, but it does have its warts. (All companies do...) If you are willing to work with the above mentioned warts, then more power to you. If you cant, then this isn't the place for you.

Regardless of your decision, you're not wrong.
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Pros
'pay' for college, decent amount of vacation, decent resume builder.
Cons
almost impossible to get fulltime, draconian management expecting draconian results.
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Busy environment with social atmosphere
PSC (Current Employee) –  Louisville, KYJuly 16, 2013
On a regular day, one badges in at the guard shack and rides a transport vehicle for about 10-15 minutes until they get to their work area. Once at the work area, one must badge in again to start pay, and everyone meets in a designated area to receive the details of the day, which include (but are not limited to): the final flight arriving for the day, safety tips, weather advisories, etc. You are then prompted to go to your work area and start working when your supervisor gives you the "green-light". You usually work for about 3-4 hours until it's time to go home receiving 10 minute breaks sometime during those hours. When the day is over, there is about a 10-15 minute ride back to the guard shack, or one as the option to walk if so chosen.

I've learned that it is best to make it to the transport waiting area (guard shack) as early as possible to avoid being late to your work area. That would generally mean arriving at the guard shack about 25-30 minutes before your given start time considering there is approximately a 7-10 minute wait between each transport's arrival to the guard shack.

The management tries to be as helpful as possible when it comes to issues and concerns. They also try to provide things such Gatorade, popsicles, and wet towels on hot summer days whenever they are able to. They try to help out with discussed injuries and ways to minimize and prevent further injury by providing tips as to how to take it easy or by simply putting an employee on light-duty jobs. They even try to work with employees that may have issues elsewhere but are still trying to remain
  more... dedicated to the job.

The co-workers enjoy socializing and having their own groups.

The hardest part of the job would be the changing weather conditions. During summer months, it can get extremely hot having to constantly move to keep up with the work flow. One would need to find ways to remain cool and still do their job. During the winter months, it can get cold enough to a point where constantly moving will not help in keeping you warm in many cases. It is best to bundle up just the right amount to find a balance between getting too warm or still remaining cold while working during winter months. There are also times where the work flow is heavier on some days than others, but the work usually gets finished around the same time every day.

The most enjoyable part of the job is the flexibility. If you need to be out at a certain time, you can inform your supervisor and they can arrange things to where you can work for the amount of time they need you, but still get out early enough to take care of something at home whether it is: picking up your children after school, having to go to school, a second job, or anything else that is of importance to you.
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Pros
benefits, flexibility
Cons
weather conditions
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The UPS Store
Sales Associate (Former Employee) –  Walnut, CADecember 5, 2015
The UPS Store
From my experience from The UPS Store, there were total of five workers including the manager who was also the owner of the Store. There were two stores, Walnut store and La Habra store. I mostly worked in the Walnut store. My main responsibility for Walnut store was opening. I would arrived at the store 10 minutes before the business hour start to prepare everything. I would start the UPS shipping system, check if the starting cash balance is correct, and unlock the gate. During business hours, I would process the shipments for the customers, recommend merchandises and services that we provide and answer phone calls regarding shipments and mailboxes. I learned some sales techniques when I was working there. Up Sale for example, when I saw a customer seem to be urgent with their shipments, I would recommend the next day air guaranteed service and if they worried about the price, I would recommend the next level which is 2nd day guaranteed shipping service. Sometimes, when customers came in with packages that seemed to be packed not secured, I would recommend them with a packaging service or an insurance. Some other responsibilities I had are sorting out mails and packages for mailbox holders who rented our business or private mailboxes; packing returned devices such as iphones or at&t uverse devices; and filling out retails when there were a downtime. When I needed to close the store which was not very often, I need to first balance the cash, then, let the ups driver signed for the packages we received, performed End of Day for UPS system, poste every transactions
  more... to Quickbook and close out the gate. Specific things regarding shipments and the store are, price was determined by size, weight and location, all ups packages were tracked and 1st day, 2nd day packages were guaranteed if not, ups would give all money back, and manager work as an owner for the store so he could generate profit by getting commissions.
Some suggestions to the UPS store that I worked: First, the manager did not hire enough people for two stores. There were only total of 4 employees and only one full-time. During business hours, most of the time, the store was very busy and there would be 5-6 customers waiting in line that needed help so I would suggest him to hire at least one more full-time since the sales for each stores was increasing every month. Second, manager did not provide employees with stable schedule which cause the employees to get confused all the time and miss out on shifts. I would suggest a stabilized schedule or hire full-time workers in case of emergency because when no one is working in the store, the store won’t generate money by itself.
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Physically demanding, fast-paced environment with rewarding pay
DRIVER (Former Employee) –  Brooklyn, NYOctober 7, 2014
The day started with the driver punching in for the work day on the DIAD board. Then a pre-work meeting was held by management regarding the previous day's stats and the current day's expected stats. Drivers proceeded to their assigned trucks to assess the package count for the day by the vehicle loader. Packages were then delivered according to the order of the planned route design. During the course of the day, packages were picked up from the assigned pickup customers in that area. After the last pickup or delivery was made, drivers returned to the building. All paperwork collected during the day was turned in for processing. Drivers punched out on the DIAD board and returned it to the docking station for recharge and for upload of the day's information.

The experience at UPS is one that requires strong mental and physical ability to be productive. The workload per vehicle was physically challenging. There were many occasions where the trucks were fully loaded to maximum capacity. The day consisted of many trips up and down, and in and out of the truck. The job demanded someone who is physically fit. The mental challenge of the job sometimes involved dealing with the traffic or irate customers.

The management team provided the employees with the expectations for the day. However, there times when the demands made by the management team were questioned. It may have been a decision as to whether safety protocols had to be compromised or satisfy a supervisor's demands. There were occasions where a union representative had to become involved in disputes between a driver and
  more... a supervisor.

The co-workers worked as a team to get the job done. They didn't just halted the relationship at co-workers. They at many times became great friends.

The hardest part of the job was trying to keep up with the pace of the amount of work for the day in the time allotted for the route. Another hard part of the job was being with the family as much as possible during the week. The job required that you work at least 2 hours overtime every day. Depending on the situation in your personal life, that demand for family was sometimes difficult to meet.

The most enjoyable part of the job was that your co-workers were your best friends those 5 days of the week. We all met for lunch every day and just that one hour we spent together leaving the job out of our break time was enough to get us through the rest of the day. Then, depending on what time we finished after work together, we all were able to kick back and reflect on the day we had.
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Pros
excellent pay, great benefits
Cons
demands made by management at times
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Your just another number in their system
Part-time Preload Supervisor (Former Employee) –  Oklahoma City, OKSeptember 27, 2014
Although I was probably in best shape of my life, UPS (management and HR) doesn't care about you as an individual or your overall well-being. All they care about is that you show up to work your butt off, and never make mistakes because not only will you be criticized by every manager that looks your way, but it will go in your employee file, just so they look good on paper to corporate. I'm sure my situation is different from everyone else, but my ex-fiancé is in management, and even though I had several supervisors tell me and members of the HR department that they felt I was qualified to take the part-time management assessment, HR would not allow me to take the test until I agreed to move out of my ex's house. However, even after I moved out and we continued to be friends, HR still limited me to the positions I could work because they felt it was a conflict of interest for my ex and I to work in departments that might have to share "air" at some point in time. They didn't seem to care when I was just a customer counter associate and he trained me to be his backup for when he was on vacation. Like I said, I'm sure my situation is different than others, but they do frown upon employee's seeing other employee's, management or not.
Honestly, this job is for the young and energetic, that just needs a part-time job and wants to save on a gym membership. Anyone that stays with UPS for anything longer than a few years is going to find that job is not only one of the dirtiest jobs, but one that will do more damage to your ankles, knees, elbows, shoulders and back in the long run.
  more... Their expectations are computer-based and not logical nor realistic if they cared anything about you as an individual instead of a number.
In all, what did I enjoy best about the job, the customers! It was rewarding to me to know that I could make a difference to the customers and try to go above and beyond the UPS standard for them. Although I couldn't fix every mistake the UPS system made, most customers knew that I took the time to listen to their issue/complaint and try to make it right. Isn't that how it should be? Shouldn't we all put ourselves in the customer's shoes and ask how would we want to be treated? I'm not saying the customer is always right and they are always honest, but for the customer's willing to give me a chance, I at least tried to make a difference. Isn't that UPS' saying "What can BROWN do for you?"
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Pros
great exercise, decent pay for management, opportunities for advancement
Cons
most positions are part-time, company lacks overall care of your well-being, unrealistic expectations
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Good part-time job if you have thick skin and don't mind hard work.
Package Handler (Former Employee) –  Edison, NJMay 21, 2015
Working for UPS as a package handler is hard work. HR will direct you to a working location in the hub and give you title, you will either work in the unload, loading, sorting, or air building (small sort). Sorting requires you to take and pass a sort test, you will need to know zip codes, and you will get a 1.00$ raise. If you are in the unload to can expect to unload 5-10+ trailers a shift depending on the work load. There is not much you need to know as a unloader you just get everything out of the trailer and onto the extendo belt as fast and safe as you can and move to the next trailer, its hard work and you will get a work out and sweat. Sorting is self explanatory you stand and sort packages all shift nothing else to it. If you are a loader like I was you can expect to constantly lifting and loading trailers for 5 to 6 hours a day. Packages can weigh from 5 ounces- 100 pounds+. You are required to scan each package, build strong and solid walls with packages, handle hazmats, and pick up irregular freight packages that drivers drop off outside your trailer. Management wants you to work fast and have at least a (200 package per hour load rate) so that trailers can get out on time. Management can be annoying sometimes but they are just doing their job. They won't bother you if you are doing your work. Starting pay is 10.00$ i believe now that the new contract is negotiated. pay increase after 90 days and another increase after 1 year. Union dues start at 25.00$ a month. Good benefits with tuition assistance if you are a college student they will pay for books and help with  more... tuition. Room for advancement you can become a supervisor if you work hard, pass the test, and management likes you. Supervisors are non-union, about $15.00 a hourly/salary i believe. You will loose weight and gain muscle within the 3 months of work if you are a loader or in the unload and if you work hard. It is not a bad job just work hard, don't be lazy, and have thick skin and you will be fine.

When you start work make sure you bring:
- A gallon of water
-Steel toe boots
- A light snack
- your ID
- gloves
and a handkerchief or a rag.
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Pros
Benefits/tuition assistance, decent pay, safe lifting techniques, room for advancement (supervisor or driver), overtime and time and a half, decent coworkers, payed vacation, sick days, willing to work with you, the longer you stay with the company the more money you will make
Cons
Hard work if you are not use to it, management can be annoying, very short break, fast turn over people quit constantly, work environment can be dirty, work environment can be stressful
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No legitimate opprotunity for advancement
Driver-Helper, Seasonal (Former Employee) –  Romoland, CADecember 18, 2014
2008, 2009, 2010, and 2013 peaks under my belt (somehow got lost in the shuffle for 2011 and 2012).

Basically, they tell you whatever they need to get you to follow through for seasonal, string you along, and then promptly throw you away. They always drive hard about "if you do good, we'll rehire"... but it never happens.

Your performance doesn't matter. Your punctuality doesn't matter. Going the extra mile counts for nothing. There is absolutely not a thing you can do or even have done for them, that will matter. You will get exactly nowhere with UPS as a seasonal hire hoping to advance. There are ZERO opportunities to advance into a permanent part-time (let alone permanent full-time) position.

This, of course, doesn't apply if you are a friend or family member of an upper-manager. They get right in (unseasoned and all). "Off-the-street", or even returning seasonal hires, get absolutely nowhere. The ONLY reason to work seasonally for them, is for their touted opportunity for advancement. Well, I'm telling you, there is none. It's all smoke. They need you to make rate for peak (they literally couldn't manage it without a whole slew of us) and that's IT. You mean nothing to them otherwise. The pay, and especially the severely depreciated average hours worked, is not worth even getting out of bed for. That's not why people go for seasonal with UPS.

When I was last doing it, compensation was still $8.50/hr. And if the center or hub was using EDD/PAS, you got MAYBE 3.5 hours (last time I ever netted more than 4 hours a day was back in 2009). So a whopping $29.75 a day gross
  more... before taxes and your fuel expense, for literally busting your rump to maximum (which was actually something I enjoyed, but regardless, that's not the point).

So my seasoned advice here, would be don't even think about it. Be smart and look elsewhere - ANYWHERE ELSE. Don't get stuck like I did. I now, apparently, can't get hired anywhere because I wasted too much time trying to get into UPS (if only I knew then what I know now...). Biggest mistake of my life thus far. I deeply regret it now. The 'experience' counts for nothing to prospective employers in my experience.

You cannot get ANYBODY on the phone, so don't even think this will do ANYTHING for your resume as far as experience. Your prospective employer will NOT be able to reach anybody to find out about you. You won't even have been remembered at all, anyway. No matter what. Rehire-status 1, or not. Top of the team rankings, or not. Driving WAY out of "your neighborhood" or not. I stress again, NOTHING will get you inside UPS after a season (or four).
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Pros
the work is fun
Cons
dead-end
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Good entry management job with genuine upper management potential
Part-Time Operations Supervisor, UPS (Former Employee) –  Sedalia, MONovember 29, 2012
I worked at UPS for 8 1/2 years, 5 1/2+ of which were in the operations management sector. My typical day, and it was a part-time job, involved collecting data for the upcoming day, such as performance metrics, scanning equipment, trailer identification, sealing tags and it's associated record sheet. Other days involved similar duties but for aircraft shipping containers. I was also responsible for scanning equipment, their set-up, maintenance and data processing. After performing these duties, I organized my personnel (anywhere from 1-12 persons depending on the area), briefed them on previous day results, todays expectations and most importantly our daily safety briefings. Every day was a learning experience for personnel, data and equipment management. Our day, performance and length of duty for the day was entirely dependent on incoming shipping volume. Getting experience with multiple personnel, different sections, and job descriptions allowed a great increase in practical knowledge, not only for the company, but my development as well. Management at UPS varied, depending on location. From my experience, at the larger facilities, tended to function better and have a greater sense of camaraderie, rather than at the smaller facilities which tended to be more "every man for himself". One thing can be said about the adjacent and upper management is that they do really care a great deal, among an intensity for success for their position. Many of whom which had advanced further up within the company. Coworkers at the company also varied, however, an unfortunate majority, in my  more... opinion, of the unionized employees (anyone non-management), tended to behave in a manor that would limit their section of potential and growth in favor of putting others at risk for another dollar. Management peers tended to be on the same level as myself, with many looking for ways to make our sections grow and perform better. The most difficult part of the job was the interaction between management and union during extraordinarily high volume days. Personnel restrictions and union mandates prevented our areas from performance at their peak potential. My most enjoyable part of the day was the interaction and fellowship I gained with my management peers. We worked together on a level that I didn't experience until I entered into the Army.  less
Pros
part-time hours, with full-time benefits, strong physical activity
Cons
union labor restrictions, union greed and favoritism
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Driver Assistant Review of Company
Seasonal Driver Assistant (Former Employee) –  Gardena, CAJanuary 2, 2015
December is UPS's busiest time of the year, and in this case, Christmas. Every year the number of parcels delivered increases, and the demand for help becomes evident, as the days start from 8-9am and reach 10-12pm. Each truck can have between 200-500 stops, with many of the drivers continuing delivering on another truck after completion of their own.

As a seasonal helper with the ambition, drive and commitment to prove ones self in hopes of a acquiring long term employment, I sought this position out. After orientation meetings that showcased managers and employees who painted a picture of honor, punctuality, and unwavering dedication to it's clients in the most demanding of times, I immediately felt I was in the right place.

During that time I worked for a few drivers responsible for an area of southern California, where every driveway was a hill or an extended staircase. My shoes were lopsided because there wasn't a single landing of flat pavement; everything on foot was either a downhill or uphill venture. Not once did my driver ever leave the confines of his truck: for this I felt the beginning of a flawed system.

Prior to the week of Christmas my driver kept me for 12+ hours a day, only to have a 30 minute lunch and never a break. I definitely didn't feel expressing a 15 minute break would be beneficial to my position. That Friday my Grandmother, widower and 92, fell down and her rib punctured her lung. I immediately called HQ, 6am in the morning, in hopes that would find another runner in time.

The following week, the week of Christmas, I was given a total of 7 hours.
  more... With nothing to buy my family presents with and no money even for public transportation, I felt something was amiss.

The week after Christmas I received no hours for work, no explanation or indication of my employment status, no paycheck for the previous week, and no correspondence to my inquiries as to what was going on.

For a company that threatens you with a Terrorist status from the Department of Homeland Security for not returning a uniform, I was troubled. For a company that prides itself on loyalty and hard work, I was deeply confused. For a company with many double standards, I started to feel grossly tossed aside. Suddenly I was less than a line on their bottom dollar printout.

I have yet to hear back from anyone, including the union.
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Pros
excersize, exercise, exercise.
Cons
lack of breaks, incompetent hr, missing pay, strong workplace politics
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Not necessarily terrible, but there are better jobs.
Seasonal Driver Helper (Former Employee) –  Maspeth, NYDecember 13, 2014
A typical day began with a phone call notifying you that you were needed, typically giving you an hour and a half to arrive there. Though, if you know how long your commute is, chances are that you will already be gone. After waiting in the garage with the other drivers and helpers, you and your driver will leave, arrive at the first stop of the driver's route and begin. Aside from a few deliveries that only the driver can do, you will be delivering packages with the driver, and by delivering, I mean as the drivers typically do. You will scan the package, receive signatures and post absence stickers if required.

The main downside to this is that you will learn how to use the scanning device (DIAD) on the job because despite there being an orientation that will inform you of ethical and safety guidelines, there is nothing that prepares you for the use of the DIAD, which while user-friendly, is not something that should ideally be learned on-the-job, especially when it's a job that requires you to be fast.

What I mean by fast, is that you will be doing this job at a time when drivers are overwhelmed by the large amount of packages, since it's during the holiday season, so depending on the driver you get, you could be constantly told to hurry up despite the lack of training you are given prior to being paired with the driver.

Another downside, depending on whether or not you want to call it one are the hours. Despite what the website may tell you, you will be working around 10 hours a day Monday-Friday, though it does mean that you will get overtime pay, you won't get home until
  more... late at night, So you will end up waking up early and getting home late, and at the amount that you are paid, unless you absolutely need it, I don't think it's worth it. Also you need to bundle up because the jacket and pants that UPS provides do not do much in the cold.

If I were to give a positive, it's that you are given the opportunity to see how well you can learn new things on-the-job.

I'm sorry that this review is wordy, but I wanted to give as accurate a description as I could, bottom line, if you need money, go ahead, but if you have room to negotiate, look for something else.
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Pros
positions seem to be in constant demand, so if you apply, you should get hired quickly, it is a good opportunity to see what you can do and how much you can handle
Cons
long hours, relatively low pay, the driver may get on your nerves, your training will be on-the-job
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Best company I have ever worked for!!
Systems Manager (Former Employee) –  Paramus NJ, Louisville KY, Chicago IL, Dallas TXApril 26, 2015
The culture and management philosophy of UPS was a 100% fit to my way of thinking. You say what you're going to do and then you do what you said!! Every manager and employee is accountable to this approach. We worked together as partners, management by consensus, you speak your mind and then support the final decision. We tried to treat people fairly and equally, man, woman, black or white. The review process was always being reviewed and improved. People were frequently moved around to experience different aspects of the business. When I first joined UPS I was assigned to the Airline Group in New Jersey as a Project Leader. UPS had decided to become an airline and replace the six different airline companies operating as contractors for UPS. I had no airline experience. I was sent to Sweden for one month to learn the Flight Following software of SAS (Scandinavian Airline System). My job was to modify that software to accommodate the business philosophy and operating practices of UPS. We had nine months to complete that project and it was implemented on time and without a hitch. I was then promoted to Project Manager and relocated to Louisville, where the air hub is located, to take on more airline project development efforts. When I started with UPS there were a total of about 350 IT folks. Now, there are about 6,000. I was part of that massive expansion of IT. We had to hire a great number of application developers in a very short period. We created interview teams to help select the right people for the right jobs. We then had to introduce the new people  more... to the UPS culture. What a wonderful experience this was for me. Two years later I was promoted to Systems Manager. My biggest challenge at UPS was when I was asked if I could integrate seven newly purchased companies on the northern border of the US into a single operating entity. I said yes, but had no idea how I was going to do that. I found this to be very scary because I have never done anything like this before. I brought in a few good people and we got it done. UPS was extremely supportive and helped us in every way they could.  less
Pros
The culture of the company and the breadth and challenge of the project efforts.
Cons
UPS placed top managers from purchased companies into key positions, Those managers did not share the UPS culture, those same managers brought in their own people at the expense of UPSers.
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Not for the Faint of Heart, but the Goal-Oriented
Operations Supervisor (Current Employee) –  Doraville, GAAugust 29, 2013
UPS has been one of the largest catalysts in my life. Previous to working here, I had no definitive goals in mind as far my future was concerned. Working at UPS has taught me a discipline I wasn't aware of; the ability to do what has to be done 100% of the time regardless the obstacles; extreme punctuality; the ability to take a situation at face value and break it down into manageable pieces. A typical day for me is to wake up at 2:15 am to be ready and at work by 3:30. I then set up my work area by ensuring the proper trucks are placed in the proper areas, that each truck has its own identifying placard, that all previous discrepancy and missed-delivery packages from the previous shift are removed and run back through the system, followed by a short pre-sort meeting with my employees discussing yesterday's numbers with planned verse actual and where and what disconnects may have hindered us, followed by recognition of employees that may have hit milestones in their career or just safe behavior in general. Afterwards, I start our operation and packages begin to be processed through my area, being loaded by my loaders. I follow behind these employees, performing method and behavior certifications, OSHA OJH observation forms, as well as picking through the trucks of loaders with a poor performance record to assist in reducing packages being put on the wrong trucks. After four hours of this process in a few various manners, I begin to reduce my staffing and wrap up my work area. After 9 o'clock EST, drivers are dispatched once my Dispatch, On-Road, and Center Managers are satisfied  more... with load qualities. Upon dispatch, I remove myself to my bosses office, where I proceed to do as much of his paperwork as I may before he takes himself to a meeting with his peers, at which point I leave and go home.

Our management teams are great at getting the most of us, and incentivize us well. The hardest part of the job specifically is working around the Teamsters Union Contract all of our part-timers are protected under. The most enjoyable part of my job is seeing the end result of my planning and hard work come to fruition when those drivers leave the Hub and knowing that not only myself but all those under me did the best we could to make it happen this day.
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Pros
advancement opportunity, competitive salary, tuition reimbursement
Cons
union
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