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Victoria55 in Hendersonville, Tennessee

68 months ago

Am I wrong about this?

Aren't there laws about FALSE ADVERTISEMENT?

The phony jobs that Apple One and other employment agenceis post appears to me as false advertisement.

Maybe they should be reported to the Better Business Bureau!!

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Victoria55 in Hendersonville, Tennessee

68 months ago

Am I wrong about this?

Aren't there laws about FALSE ADVERTISEMENT?

The phony jobs that Apple One and other employment agencies post appears to me as false advertisement.

Maybe they should be reported to the Better Business Bureau!!

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mimushen in Beverly, New Jersey

67 months ago

Just to follow up, I got a job last week for a position THAT I APPLIED FOR MYSELF. Do the footwork, and you will see results, DO NOT USE STAFFING COMPANIES!!!

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Lupe Gonzalez in Plano, Texas

67 months ago

Congratulations on the new job.
Actually, I think its a lot easier to get a job by applying to the company directly, rather than using a recruiter or agency.

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Lupe Gonzalez in Plano, Texas

67 months ago

Yes, headhunter often are not good at figuring out whether or not someone is suitable for a certain job. They can screen you out unfairly - or worse, put you in a job that you aren't suited for.

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florgrl* in De Forest, Wisconsin

67 months ago

Most temp agencies around here have no actual jobs. They give you tests, tell you that you scored well, and then you seldom hear from them. I finally received a call from 3 agencies, on the same day, all saying they were sending my resume to the same job in my city. One said I was over qualified, one said they had 100 resumes to review, and the other one never called back. They hired someone else, I was told several months later. However, the job was placed on hold, due to lack of business. So the poor dumb slob who got the job is still unemployed. That's life in Wisconsin, sit around and watch the cars rust while you wait for some temp service to call. I for one am no longer waiting or anticipating a job from any temp service. A total waste of time!!

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Staffing Guru in Somewhere out there, California

66 months ago

Lupe Gonzalez in Plano, Texas said: Yes, headhunter often are not good at figuring out whether or not someone is suitable for a certain job.

What are you basing this statement on? Do you believe that a headhunter makes up the qualifications themselves?
Lupe Gonzalez in Plano, Texas said: They can screen you out unfairly
Unfairly? Like not being qualified? What is unfairly? Just curious? I am trying to understand your line of thinking.
Lupe Gonzalez in Plano, Texas said: or worse, put you in a job that you aren't suited for.

Why would you except a job that you are not suited for? Again not trying to be combative just curious.

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Lupe Gonzalez in Plano, Texas

66 months ago

The problem is, many of the job advertisements people apply to, are fake. Its not just headhunters and temp agencies that post phony job ads. Companies are doing it all the time. I think this practice should be illegal, but that will probably never happen. We jobseekers just need to wise up and revise our job search strategies.

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Lupe Gonzalez in Plano, Texas

66 months ago

Well, for starters, some recruiters live in INDIA, they will call me on the phone and pitch a job to me that is 500 miles away from where I live. Outsourcing recruiters - incredibly stupid.

Also, many recruiters certainly may know what the client company wants, they often have no idea what or where to find it.

You don't have to be brilliant to become a headhunter. You just need a phone and a good internet connection. Any Joe Blow can be be a headhunter!

Sorry if the truth hurts.

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Staffing Guru in Somewhere out there, California

66 months ago

Oh Misplaced!
One of the weakest forms of debate is to attack the person vs. the point they make. It is a clear sign of how weak your argument is to attack the person instead of the point.

Any educated person who supports a post-modern grammatical ideology would be less concerned with the words and more concerned with what the worlds are perceive to say. Typically you find the less educated compensating with over critical attacks to abrogate inferiority.

Clearly a self-proclaimed genius and a "legal professional" would be better versed in more effective techniques. Someone who took a low-level debate class would be able to recognize the flaw in your technique. This could make one question the claims of superiority that you spew on these forums.

Oh, look there I was almost sucked into your petty game! Let me stay constructive and to the point.

As a direct source to companies in multiple markets and a business owner I provide a level of insight that you may not like however it is true.

I do have one question for you. “Coneheaded”? Saturday Night Live reference?

Note: you write at about a 5th grade level. Not really impressed =)

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Lupe Gonzalez in Plano, Texas

66 months ago

I was responding to the following statement:

"What are you basing this statement on? Do you believe that a headhunter makes up the qualifications themselves? "

My answer is, that headhunters do not have any qualifications to do their jobs. There is no special licensing or certification required to become a headhunter. No tests to pass, no degrees to obtain from any school. Any person can become a recruiter or headhunter, so this is a huge reason why there are lots of headhunters out there who have no idea how to place candidates in certain jobs. That is not an attack, it is simply the truth. Anyone can with a telephone and a good internet connection can bill himself as a "headhunter". They could do with some training, most of them probably never get it.

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Staffing Guru in Somewhere out there, California

66 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: And that is a classic straw man argument, "Guru." What you have done is misrepresent one of my prior statements and try to attack it. I never proclaimed I was a "genius," "Guru," and you know damn well I haven't. A genius has a 140 or better IQ, "Guru." Sadly, "Guru," my IQ is 129. My IQ puts me in the "high superior" category and one point below "gifted." Got a ways to go before I hit 140, but I'm working on it! :-)

Overcompensating and under educated is one of the biggest issues in America today. Thank you for making my point.

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Staffing Guru in Somewhere out there, California

66 months ago

Lupe Gonzalez in Plano, Texas said:
My answer is, that headhunters do not have any qualifications to do their jobs. There is no special licensing or certification required to become a headhunter. No tests to pass, no degrees to obtain from any school.

Unfortunately this isn’t a true statement. Headhunters are typically required to have at least a degree in some discipline. More often then not it is human resources or a related field. Consulting for some of the major player in the industry I have found very few successful or employed individuals who have not obtained this basic level of education.

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Staffing Guru in Somewhere out there, California

66 months ago

Lupe Gonzalez in Plano, Texas said:
Any person can become a recruiter or headhunter, so this is a huge reason why there are lots of headhunters out there who have no idea how to place candidates in certain jobs.

I agree with this statement. Like a lot of people in many professions people are lazy. I could apply this model to almost ever job class or position. Typically I would suggest focusing on companies who specialize specifically on your job classification. Most of the major staffing companies/agencies have specialized divisions dedicated to niche categories/fields.

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Staffing Guru in Somewhere out there, California

66 months ago

Lupe Gonzalez in Plano, Texas said: That is not an attack it is simply the truth. Anyone can with a telephone and a good Internet connection can bill himself as a "headhunter". They could do with some training, most of them probably never get it..

While I understand your animosity it is not exactly that simple. Staffing is regulated in the states (United States for legal beagle) despite what you might read on the “Internet”. No matter how much or how little it does exist. Furthermore the government also has some very stringent regulations that must be followed to do business in this field. Couple that with payroll cost, unemployment liability, compliance, any additional certification or licenses (EEOC,WMBE, MBE, ISO), ect… Staffing is a very complex industry to be successful and/or even break into.

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Staffing Guru in Somewhere out there, California

66 months ago

Lupe Gonzalez in Plano, Texas said: The problem is, many of the job advertisements people apply to, are fake. Its not just headhunters and temp agencies that post phony job ads. Companies are doing it all the time. I think this practice should be illegal, but that will probably never happen. We jobseekers just need to wise up and revise our job search strategies.

If you can confirm a fake posting then I would report that company.

Personally I do not understand this tactic because of the great cost of advertising. It costs hundreds of dollars to post a single add on Monster or CareerBuilder (two of the largest and well known). Posting a fictitious advertisement would net very little sales results in comparison to the cost.

Now, a stronger method would be to recruit a viable candidate for your client. In the process you would speak to a reference to validate the validity of a candidates background. Typically the “Client” potential they might be will broach the topic way before you ever bring it up. You see it not typically necessary to even solicit business. They come to you.

On the other hand you might have a viable candidate who is looking for a position. Now you just interviewed a candidate who has left that exact same position. You are speaking to a client for the purpose of doing a reference and you mention that you have such a candidate. Why wouldn’t you say something? Why would you not try and create an opportunity for a candidate?

Those last statements are more directed to someone’s previous comments Lupe. Please don’t infer it was towards you. =)

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Staffing Guru in Somewhere out there, California

66 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Bullshiit, "Guru." In Colorado, as with real, legitimate employers, agencies are barred from practicing sex, age, gender and racial discrimination. Otherwise, Colorado does not - I repeat, so you will understand, DOES NOT - regulate agencies in any way. I researched Colorado employment agency laws long ago. Once again, "Guru," you've served up more self-serving, defensive baloney.

Interesting…To be compliant with Federal regulations for staffing for the government you cannot, let me repeat, CANNOT do anything Illegal in your process. Any violations would immediately disqualify a company. While you might have low state requirements the fed always steps in. Every major staffing agency that is of any note follows these guidelines and complies to maintain governmental contracts. This applies to the entire process in any state regardless if the candidate works for the government or not.

I could continue but this alone disqualifies your argument.

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JR1867 in North Carolina

66 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Nice try, "Guru," at a red herring. We're talking about licensing and regulation of employment agencies, not agencies complying with laws regarding discrimination and illegal employment practices. You have injected agency government contracts, which is irrelevant to this discussion.

Yes, "Guru," employment agencies are subject to the same anti-discrimination and illegal employment practice laws as real employers. The government may step in if these laws are breached, as it would for a real employer. But it is left up to states to enact laws and regulations regarding licensing of any profession, including employment agencies, as their legislatures may see fit. E.g., New York, Arizona and Washington are three states I found that require employment agencies to be licensed. Once again, Colorado does not require employment agencies to be licensed.

Do you understand the difference between obtaining a license to be an employment agency and complying with anti-discrimination and illegal employment practice laws, "Guru"?

I just want to know who died and made you in charge. You police this thing like its your job. I understand the help but you see no good in anythign do you?

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Staffing Guru in Somewhere out there, California

66 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said:
You have injected agency government contracts, which is irrelevant to this discussion.

It is completely relevant and here is why. You countered my point of regulation saying that your current state has none. Regardless of the fact your state has low or no regulation I countered that this point as irrelevant because any company (every top staffing agency in the United States) leverages for governmental contracts. With that fact they must abide by strict guidelines that transcend any lack of state regulation. Each company must report a number of details (including what you seem to be stuck on “EEOC”) and are closely monitored. Practices and procedures are stipulated by the Fed and maintained by these companies to remain compliant and viable for any existing or potential contract.

Now, beyond that fact most agencies will seek additional certification for internal regulation. ISO for example is a certification that mandates internal processes and compliance within an organization. These certifications are awarded by external and well-established organizations that work as “Checks and Balances”. Sending external auditors into those organizations to witness if these standards are being met.

· Needs to demonstrate its ability to consistently provide product that meets customer and applicable statutory and regulatory requirements, and
· Aims to enhance customer satisfaction through the effective application of the system, including processes for continual improvement of the system and the assurance of conformity to customer and applicable statutory and regulatory requirements.
Any variance would result in an immediate forfeiture of this certification. That alone would loose most companies millions of dollars.

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Staffing Guru in Somewhere out there, California

66 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Do you understand the difference between obtaining a license to be an employment agency and complying with anti-discrimination and illegal employment practice laws, "Guru"?

You said nothing about licensing in your first post. Now you fall back on that because your point was countered and demolished. I have addressed the original issue that even low state regulation has little bearing on the point at hand. Regulatory entities go beyond just that state. As an additional note most companies are based in a particular state. Because of this they would also adopt the “Home” states laws and abide by those regulations, certifications, and licensing. But hey! You knew all that right?

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Staffing Guru in Somewhere out there, California

66 months ago

Staffing Guru in Somewhere out there, California said: It is completely relevant and here is why. You countered my point of regulation saying that your current state has none. Regardless of the fact your state has low or no regulation I countered that this point as irrelevant because any company (every top staffing agency in the United States) leverages for governmental contracts. With that fact they must abide by strict guidelines that transcend any lack of state regulation. Each company must report a number of details (including what you seem to be stuck on “EEOC”) and are closely monitored. Practices and procedures are stipulated by the Fed and maintained by these companies to remain compliant and viable for any existing or potential contract. Now, beyond that fact most agencies will seek additional certification for internal regulation. ISO for example is a certification that mandates internal processes and compliance within an organization. These certifications are awarded by external and well-established organizations that work as “Checks and Balances”. Sending external auditors into those organizations to witness if these standards are being met.

· Needs to demonstrate its ability to consistently provide product that meets customer and applicable statutory and regulatory requirements, and
· Aims to enhance customer satisfaction through the effective application of the system, including processes for continual improvement of the system and the assurance of conformity to customer and applicable statutory and regulatory requirements.
Any variance would result in an immediate forfeiture of this certification. That alone would lose most companies millions of dollars.

sorry misspelled something..didn't want legal to miss the point.

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

66 months ago

Folks, I don't think anyone is saying anything significant here.

"Must follow strict guidelines"?????
Now, beyond that fact most agencies will seek additional certification for internal regulation.

You're all wasting your time.

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Staffing Guru in Somewhere out there, California

66 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: You are really a piece of work, "Guru." You see, "Guru," regulation connotes licensing. Here is what I wrote earlier. Read it again, please. Once more, "Guru," another poster had stated that agencies do not fall under any licensing or similar regulations:[QUOTE who="Lupe Gonzalez said: [H]eadhunters do not have any qualifications to do their jobs. There is no special licensing or certification required to become a headhunter. No tests to pass, no degrees to obtain from any school........which is inaccurate in part. My research reveals that forty-one states require employment agencies to be licensed, including California, where you are kept. Again, Colorado does not have employment agency licensing. It should. You really show how inept you are, "Guru," by how you try to twist my words to suit your misguided purposes. You've tried a straw man, a red herring, and another straw man. These are all logical fallacies. Please address issues and facts as they are stated and do not distort them to suit your misbegotten arguments if you want to discuss something.

For the final time, "Guru," as with legitimate employers, employment agencies are subject to all laws barring discrimination and illegal employment practices. Your essay on these things was interesting.

You counter what you call a "Straw Man" argument with a clear straw man argument. Circular reasoning and never making a point is all you can do here because your argument is void of any purpose or point.

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

66 months ago

Guru, if I remember, we dealt with you a few months back - and I knocked you off your perch.

From what I can see, you are young, have a job, and feel quite superior. Must be those tight clothes.

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Staffing Guru in Somewhere out there, California

66 months ago

Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida said: Guru, if I remember, we dealt with you a few months back - and I knocked you off your perch.

From what I can see, you are young, have a job, and feel quite superior. Must be those tight clothes.

hmm, I don't remember being on a perch but please give me a link I would love to relive that. (no attitude just would like to re-read the information you are referring)

Young no. Superior- despite what you might assume or even take away from my posts no. Tight close? Maybe!

You dealt with me? OK great. The facts remain the same. I can give you one perspective from the proverbial "horses mouth" and you can take it or leave it. I do leave some material to interpretation as to further protect my anonymity but I would think all of you who claim such superior intellect would understand some of those nuances.

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

66 months ago

Giru - what I'm sayin is, don't you have a job? How are you finding time to spend of these forums? These past few days I have seen you all over here.

How are you finding time to do your job? I know, Displaced knows, and others know, if your EMPLOYER saw how busy you are on here, you would be fired. And here you are.

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

66 months ago

I though Guru was a staffing agent. I'm going to have to go back and read those older comments. I remember her/him being quite obnoxious.

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JR1867 in North Carolina

66 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: You called me a bum. And that's not offensive in tone or otherwise? Judge not, lest ye be judged, my friend. BTW calling other users a name, like "bum," violates the board's Terms of Service and Forum Rules.

Once more, I can write about headhunters on these fora because I can. In the meantime, let's see if you can contribute some content and not a diatribe.

Thanks

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_xXBioHazardXx_ in Texas

66 months ago

Wow..I have read a lot of posts recently and I am amazed at how much hatefulness comes from both sides of the proverbial fence.

I can only attest to what my experience has been with this particular company. I met with a gentleman who was very helpful. He told me "while I cannot promise you a job I can promise to get you as much exposure to clients as possible." He also told me that he would leverage his experience and connections to "get me more options" then I would have had just searching on my own.

To date he has taken care of me. I have had two very fruitful interviews. Increasing my options and getting me that "exposure" is what he has done and I appreciate it greatly.

I see a lot of recruiters give false hope. I was told point blank the facts and was promised a resource and not a result. I felt this was a very interesting tactic but it was honest and upfront.

My experience was positive because of those previously mentioned facts.

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Staffing Guru in Somewhere out there, California

66 months ago

Bio-
Congratulations on getting a great recruiter. Despite some of the opposition on this board good recruiters do exist. Keep the good comments coming!

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_xXBioHazardXx_ in Texas

66 months ago

Well "Guru" I did not post in support of you or your tactics. I merely wanted to communicate my personal experience.

I did find it interesting that I received two "No" to "Was this comment helpful". Folks her further my point of the hatefulness found on this board. How jaded are you folks? My goodness.

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Handsome1978 in Albuquerque, New Mexico

65 months ago

I have learned there are two types of staffing agencies: One type is the type
mentioned here: Manpower, Link, People Link, Apple One, etc; work for the
employer and are geared towards 1 day to 1 month assignments, usually in clerical or administrative assistant positions.

Others are the so-called executive or caliber recruiters a la Bernard Haldane
or Chandler Hill; charge the job seeker a fee, usually around $4,000 to $6,000
and often claim to have insight into the "hidden job market" or jobs that are
not known to the public but they have access to.

I have dealt with both kinds of agencies. I have found that they both are
in the business of making money. Companies use staffing agencies because
they do not wish to have a full time HR recruiter; human resources in
many companies simply exists as a catch all for payroll, roster updates
and certain compliance concerns. Plus, they can use agencies to
avoid direct hire obligations-certain workers' rights, unemployment
compensation, etc.

The Chandler Hill/Bernard Haldane recruiters claim to work for the job seeker, therefore the seeker pays the fee. Their main tool is a "database" of contacts;
seeker usually ends up calling the employers themselves and the recruiter actually does very little outreach with employers.

I think both types of agencies are scams of one sort or another; driven by
commissions and fees. Companies seeking low wage labor like using agencies
because it helps their bottom line in terms of not having to pay someone
to interview and vet employees and the agency gets to also be the bad cop
and do the proverbial getting rid of; cushions the blow and any hard feelings
between employee and employer.

Executive recruiters are simply high end boiler rooms.

That's that.

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Dallasarea in dallas, Texas

65 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: Headhunters are a bunch of no-goods. Among other things, they are rude, deceive and renege on promises. But what's stopping you from applying to companies directly?

Research phone books, the internet, etc., for companies and firms in your vocation. Research these companies further and determine which one at which you'd like to work. Call them and ask for the name of the HR person. Then send each of these people by name resumes and cover letters expressing your interest in a position. Use nice, professional paper for your cover letters and resumes, and send them by regular U.S. mail so they look nice upon arrival, as opposed to e-mail and fax.

Applying to companies directly takes time and effort and postage isn't cheap, but, unfortunately, job-hunting takes time and effort. But, with applying to companies directly you end-run headhunters, you are in control of your job search and, as opposed to headhunters' anonymous ads, you know where you are applying to for jobs.

I like reading your responses and thruths in replying to these posts. Keep up your replies as I am sure other people like your opinions!!

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Dallasarea in dallas, Texas

65 months ago

Lupe Gonzalez in Plano, Texas said: I agree. You can eliminate the middleman (staffing agencies) and find a job on your own. I have found jobs on my own before. It CAN be done. There is no need to feel dependent on staffing companies.

Also, staffing agencies post phony job ads. That job they advertise that you feel you are "perfect fit" for, does not actually exist.

Hey Lupe - I do agree with all of your comments on this board in reference to using agencies and thank you for responding. I get the feeling you have signed up and have gone through what everyone else has gone through in dealing with agencies. Just love the lines they tell the applicants. So tired of hearing we have nothing at this time but will call you when we do. Yeah, right!

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Handsome1978 in Albuquerque, New Mexico

65 months ago

The only real tools they bring are a database of contacts, which the client cold calls or writes and a video resume/interview. The database is sometimes
outdated and certain contacts are no longer valid. The only value proposition is
the list of valid contacts, which narrows one's search down to actual
decision makers.

The other end of recruiting agencies often deliberately place low end jobs in
executive or professional sections. For example, an AA position was recently
posted on a job board by an agency in the Real Estate section. The job
description was only nominally related to real estate; working in a bank:

Like somebody on one of the forums here said, they often place $10 per hour
jobs on line and often only want a person's references. In addition to a resume,
they ask for an application, likely trying to get references not listed on resume. Plus, they do not do a good job of determining one's likely harmony in certain jobs. This happened to me; being placed in an AA post under a self important person who talked down to me. If one asks questions to understand order and rationale, particularly when having to call customers and request more papers, they act like you are not smart; even though you have to "sell" a customer on why they need to do something. There often is no training other than being bounced around to different full timers and other AAs like a basketball. And, certain companies like it because at a certain point, they just start the
process again before one can make any eligibility for certain employer-employee
obligations.

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Staffing Guru in Somewhere out there, California

65 months ago

[QUOTE who="Displaced Legal Professional

In fairness, there are legitimate headhunters who recruit six-figure corporate executives. I understand their client companies pay their fees. I understand these outfits are very discreet and very professional. Their clients and recruits wouldn't tolerate anything less.

Hey DLP you mentioned something. " I understand their client companies pay their fees". If any of you go into an agency and they tell you that "you must pay a fee" run.. That is a sure sign of a scam.

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Lupe Gonzalez in Plano, Texas

65 months ago

Recruiters love to collect references. That's usually all they want from you. The advertised job is merely a ruse. This is why I avoid recruiters, agencies and headhunters. Its so easy to get caught up in their maze of webs and lies - and its a huge time waster. That time could be better spent applying to companies directly, networking, & filling out online job applications.

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

65 months ago

Displaced: I think the recruiter said you made her look bad because she presented someone which HER CLIENT had rejected - and that made the recruiter embarassed because it reflected on the recruiter that it had lower standards than the client had. Does that make sense?

Think of it this way. A group of "wanabehotshot people" are at a nice cocktail party. One Wanabe is touting "friend-1" to all his other friends, trying to impress on his other friends out great friend-1 is. However, unknown to Wanabe, other friends had already met friend-1 - and didn't like him.

It's all in the bullsheit game.

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Dallasarea in dallas, Texas

65 months ago

I do agree with you Lupe in filling out your own application if a company has their app posted on line and a lot do. I am now getting away from using agencies and with everything I have been reading on this job forum is really a wake up call to me and perhaps to other people reading it. I refer to the (temp-to-perm to long-term) jobs as: temp to nothing, assignment completed and you don't know the real reason but leaves you guessing why it ended! And you never get ahead always starting another job (although - you do gain a lot of different experiences and work in a lot of different working evnironments) but that gets old after awhile.

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Dallasarea in dallas, Texas

65 months ago

Someone once said no job experience is wasted. You learn something from every job. So there can be value in working many jobs in many different working environments.

The bottom line, though, is exhibiting stability. Employers don't like "floaters," even if circumstances place them in that situation. I've read experts who say one should not take temp jobs for that reason. Something to the effect that temp jobs degrade a candidate - why should a company hire that candidate if he/she can't hold anything but a temp job. On the other hand, some people need the money. In that context, temp jobs shouldn't be held against candidates - but, sometimes, it is.

Displaced Legal Professional - Yes, I did mention that you do gain experience in taking different temp jobs and it is work at you are against the wall and do need the money. And I do understand how it does degrade a candidate in working for a temp agency for a long peroid of time in looking like a "floater" to an employer which is held against you and disqualifies candidates... That is where it gets you.

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Dallasarea in dallas, Texas

65 months ago

No we do not disagree what so ever. You just nailed the wording perfectly! I guess I didn't see the whole picture and what the outcome would be in staying with different agencies, but I am paying a price for it now... I agree with what everyone is saying about the temp world. Thanks for your reply and perfect wording!

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Handsome1978 in Albuquerque, New Mexico

65 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: A quick google pulls up reports that those two outfits are bogus. Indeed has Chandler Hill and CTP Partners fora that are interesting reading.

Would you also include such outfits as Delaney, Bycinski and Potamkin, and Executive Search Online? Those outfits are also bogus. I get spam from them all the time. They claim to recruit for high level executive jobs, but one must first submit a resume to them before they will reveal those jobs. Indeed has a Delaney forum.

In fairness, there are legitimate headhunters who recruit six-figure corporate executives. I understand their client companies pay their fees. I understand these outfits are very discreet and very professional. Their clients and recruits wouldn't tolerate anything less.

I am not aware of Delaney but I imagine set-up is similar to CH and
BH: Candidate replies to ad or referral. Agency calls and
asks questions; has candidate take test. Agency calls a few days
later and tells candidate they passed test and that is good because
agency only works with a select few.

In reality, anyone with a credit card not in deliquency or a functioning bank account that has not been seized or garnished
is considered a client.

Now, as for temp agencies, is it typical to have assignments ended
in 2 weeks (+/-) without any real explanation. This happened to me;
took job (see previous post for details); then got call saying
that gig was over. I then observed online on a job forum that
same job was posted 4 days after I started. I spoke with
a couple of people and maybe Displaced Legal Professional
can add some insight here; heard that after 2 weeks,
there are certain rights and benefits due employees, even
if they are interim or temp; that they begin to transition from
agency employees into company concerns (read: overhead; costs).
I also hear this is the case if there are two or more temps...

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Handsome1978 in Albuquerque, New Mexico

65 months ago

...on payroll; easier to have one on roster, give them some
employee rights and obligations and have them carry out
remainder of assignments than have two or more on payroll, which
requires some level of training, which then takes away from
one's tasks and therefore, deprives company of $$. Also, company
does not want to do even minimal training to immerse newbie
in culture, procedures, etc; creating sink/swim paradigm.

I have taken the Peyton Manning view of job seeking: View yourself
as your own corporation or business. Search companies online; fill
out applications or send resumes to person responsible
for hiring; network; cold call (dreadful but sometimes necessary)
and use agencies but as a supplement. Stress skill sets and
interests; experiences so that they may do a proper placement(I
did not do this and ended up being placed in a job I hated).

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Handsome1978 in Albuquerque, New Mexico

65 months ago

What happened to DLP's comments that followed mine? Also, can someone address
this? I spoke with a couple of people; said that after 2 weeks,
there are certain rights and benefits due employees, even
if they are interim or temp; that they begin to transition from
agency employees into company concerns and this is why interim jobs are
like assembly lines; in and out. Is this the case?

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Lupe Gonzalez in Plano, Texas

65 months ago

Yes, its true. An employer sees mostly temp jobs on a resume, and it makes the candidate look bad. That is definitely unfair, buts it reality. I think temping actually makes a job candidate more well-rounded, but employers don't see it that way.
I once temped for 2 years, and it ruined my chances of getting good jobs that I applied for.

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Lupe Gonzalez in Plano, Texas

65 months ago

Don't ever let headhunters "rip you a new one". Simply hang up on them, or leave their office, and don't go back. You are not obligated to give them information to help them place other candidates.

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Lupe Gonzalez in Plano, Texas

65 months ago

"Don't tell me clients hire don't hire candidates on the bogus premise of perm employment but can them after a few weeks because they only needed a temp, and then try to skip out of the agency's fee."

Actually, yes, some clients do this. Not all, but some. And it sometimes works - the agency releases them from most or all of the fee.

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stonyraine in Bothell, Washington

65 months ago

I think it ought to be pointed out here as well that not every staffing agency out there is a rip-off. I temped for five years in Florida with two different agencies -- one a locally owned firm that had been in business a number of years, the other a globally known staffing agency. I did apply to AppleOne once -- and was shocked to be offered a position that not only paid half of what I was used to making, but one that I had zero experience doing. I thought maybe that was just a fluke, but no -- every position advertised by AppleOne that I got a call back on was one that was "let's throw any warm body at this".

Speaking as a former temp, who did get lucky and get hired on after temping in the position for which I was hired, what you have to realize is that the position advertised may be one that an existing temp employee has filled, or that you don't meet whatever the recruiter is seeking for the position. I was a successful temp because I was annoying: I got up every morning and called the agency saying, "Hey, I'm available, put me to work" on the days I didn't have an assignment.

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TobiasR in Troy, New York

65 months ago

I work in IT and let me tell you that these technology staffing agencies/subcontractors are a COMPLETE waste of time. They will do nothing but lie to you and get your hopes up. It is true that they will post fake job ads to lure you to speaking with them. They just want resumes on file and references for when they do have a bottom-of-the-barrel position to fill. The worst are the overseas calls from India.

Linium, Robert Half, Artech, SmartSource, Intergen, SearchSolution Group--avoid these and anyone like them. If you want an IT job, you're going to have to find some place that hasn't outsourced their talent. IT is going down the tubes any way. I should have been a banker.

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Lupe Gonzalez in Plano, Texas

65 months ago

She said it doesn't cost you anything? Yes, it does. It costs you time. Time is your most valuable asset when job hunting.

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