Philips News and Happenings.

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Host

What do you think -- is this company going to survive and thrive? Are they looking to expand their staff, or do you think layoffs are inevitable?

How does Philips stack up against the competition?

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Anonymous in Birmingham, Alabama

92 months ago

You don't want to work for this manager of this position! Trust me.

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B. FRANK in New York, New York

91 months ago

Anonymous in Birmingham, Alabama said: You don't want to work for this manager of this position! Trust me.

Is your response regarding the HR Manager at the Somerset,NJ location?

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Jack in New Milford, Connecticut

90 months ago

Host said: What do you think -- is this company going to survive and thrive? Are they looking to expand their staff, or do you think layoffs are inevitable?

How does Philips stack up against the competition?

The company is always in a slash and burn mode. They classified their employee as A, B, and C player you make you C player either A or B or you move them out of the company. This is part of why this position is open as well as the manager that you would report to. Do you want to take the gamble?

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Curious in Fishkill, New York

90 months ago

Jack in New Milford, Connecticut said: The company is always in a slash and burn mode. They classified their employee as A, B, and C player you make you C player either A or B or you move them out of the company. This is part of why this position is open as well as the manager that you would report to. Do you want to take the gamble?

Just for clarification, is this for the position in Valhalla, NY b/c someone referenced Somerset, NJ?

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Ashley, San Jose, CA in Atlanta, Georgia

90 months ago

Host said: What do you think -- is this company going to survive and thrive? Are they looking to expand their staff, or do you think layoffs are inevitable?

How does Philips stack up against the competition?

This division is run by incompetent people leading the sales department, and is always frustrating due to lack of marketing skills. The hiring manager is very high spirited and over her head, unfortunately. Pay is lower than should be given for the work you will need to do. If you are up for a challenge, you are should consider this job.

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Ashley, San Jose, CA in Atlanta, Georgia

90 months ago

B. FRANK in New York, New York said: Is your response regarding the HR Manager at the Somerset,NJ location?

The PR Director of Consumer Electronics

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Former Philips Employee in Murfreesboro, Tennessee

90 months ago

Host said: What do you think -- is this company going to survive and thrive? Are they looking to expand their staff, or do you think layoffs are inevitable?

How does Philips stack up against the competition?

It depends which division of Philips you're referring to. The medical division may be the most stable when it comes to financial stregth, but the leadership has much to be desired. The reason opportunities are plentiful within Philips Medical are a result of low wages and high expectations. Prepare a financial game plan prior to interviewing.

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no name in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

90 months ago

I have never worked for Philips. But I have heard from others that they due lay off. Mgt is multi-layered and final report is the parent in Europe.

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No Name in New Milford, Connecticut

90 months ago

This position located in Springfield, IL has had a very high turn-over rate, some of the RSM's that held the RSM position where top rated people, it not all about doing your job well.

The Mid-West Zone Service VP is very difficult to work for and there are not many happy faces in the Hoffman Estate Office. They have called their employees on a Friday to tell them not to show-up for work on Monday morning (yes, fired over the phone) and that someone would collect their company issued property.

I wouldn't recomend Philips to anyone that is on a solid career path you will certainly be derailed and not know what hit you!

Is this the type of company you want to invest you carrer in?

You are better off looking elsewhere. Good Luck !

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No Name in New Milford, Connecticut

89 months ago

In one of the biggest victories for plaintiffs last year, 57-year-old Thomas Sadowski, an electrical engineer who lives in Mentor, Ohio, alleged age bias and unlawful retaliation in violation of state law against Philips Medical Systems, his former employer. A jury awarded Mr. Sadowski $7.8 million in damages in Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court in Cleveland. The amount was later reduced to an undisclosed amount as part of a settlement after Philips appealed the verdict to the Ohio Eighth District Court of Appeals.

A spokeswoman for Philips Medical, a division of Philips Electronics NV, Amsterdam, confirms that the appeal was filed and resolved "to the mutual satisfaction" of both parties before any decision was made, but she declines to comment on the terms of the settlement. "We have a very strong and clear policy prohibiting discrimination with respect to an employee's age," she says.

Mr. Sadowski had worked for 23 years at Philips, which makes medical diagnostic equipment, and companies it had acquired when he and two other older co-workers were laid off from their department, says his attorney, Mr. Thorman. (The other employees signed releases in exchange for severance packages and didn't bring legal action.) But at the time of the layoff, Mr. Thorman says, the company "simultaneously launched a college-recruiting plan.... They openly discussed their need to recruit and hire young engineers."

Mr. Sadowski applied for several open engineering positions, but the company "ignored him," Mr. Thorman says. A Philips spokesman says the company doesn't comment on personnel matters.

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No Name in New Milford, Connecticut

89 months ago

Witherspoon v. Philips Medical Systems, Inc. (W.D. Wa). Five-day jury trial. Represented defendant and obtained defense verdict in case involving claims of age discrimination arising out of a layoff. Negotiated favorable resolution of two other related claims after trial.

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Backintheday in Grand Rapids, Michigan

59 months ago

Philips has always been a train wreck waiting to happen, the local management has always struggled with international oversight, direction, and demands without vision or insight. Just a dumb and dumber model of how to run a companies within a corporation. In regard to working there the check clears each week, but you will be under paid and over worked or a target for reorganizations. There IT organization has been outsourced for more than a twelve years including the use of off shore cheap labor. They have a fifth building in Andhover, MA they opening call little INDIA.

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prh123@live.com in Grand Rapids, Michigan

40 months ago

Host said: What do you think -- is this company going to survive and thrive? Are they looking to expand their staff, or do you think layoffs are inevitable?

How does Philips stack up against the competition?

"It depends which division of Philips you're referring to. The medical division may be the most stable when it comes to financial stregth, but the leadership has much to be desired. The reason opportunities are plentiful within Philips Medical are a result of low wages and high expectations. Prepare a financial game plan prior to interviewing."

That says it all, I worked 50-80 hours a week while everyone told you how hard they were working, had to come in early, stay late, to get projects done and do support. I enjoyed the work, and the relationships with people that also enjoyed what they did. Of course, you can find that anywhere, Hey, I worked my way up, they paid for my school, in general people where very nice to me. Once you knew people in all of there product divisions, and corporate, you can can a new job in five minutes. When I needed one they told me "if we don't have one we will certainly create one for you" (three divisions Lighting, Mepco, and Medical). I was also offered a role at the Peoplesoft Compentency Center in FL. "Nice" Today, those people are all gone, mostly business managers managing costs with outsourcing, H1's, interns, and off shore help. I got rejected by a computer today for a R/3 operations role, I probably did the implementation in 1996 by myself. Was unclear why they said R/3 today (2011) when then was current in the late 1990's, replaced by SAP Enterprise Edition, and the SAP ECC (Enterprise Resource Planning Central Component). Smaller firms took releases "MySAP" and "NetWeaver 2004's" which did not scale as well. All new products are now based on ECC 6.0.

"

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prh123@live.com in Grand Rapids, Michigan

40 months ago

ar Paul,
How many CEOs does it take to screw over lighting fixture plant workers?
Just one.
Tell Philips Global's CEO: Don't outsource U.S. jobs after taking our stimulus money!

$7 million. That's how much America's taxpayers gave Philips Global in stimulus funds to continue investing in U.S. manufacturing jobs.
But Philips would rather take the money and run.
Philips is about to close one of its most profitable lighting plants, leaving 275 workers in Sparta, Tennessee, jobless and an entire community devastated. Where are those jobs going? Mexico.
The attacks on middle class jobs in Wisconsin and other states have galvanized Americans to stand up against shameful moves like this. Now these workers need our help.
Tell Philips' CEO: Keep the lights on in Sparta, Tennessee, and keep good jobs in America!
The union workers who make Philips lighting fixtures in Sparta have been doing things right for 40 years. They're committed, hardworking, and excellent at their jobs. In fact, their plant was named one of North America's 10 best in 2009 by Industry Week Magazine and even won Philips' own "lean" manufacturing award last fall.
And it's not as though Philips is a sinking ship. The company is a giant in the electronics industry, and profits in its lighting division are skyrocketing.1 There's no plausible argument for destroying these jobs.
That's why Scott Vincent, a 33-year veteran of the Philips plant, was so blindsided by the company's move. "I think Philips feels that we are just a number and that they can take what they've got here and plug it in anywhere, but they can't. We're a group of people with the experience and know-how to make this place run."
Scott and his coworkers, along with community and small business leaders, elected officials, and workers' rights activists, are working together to convince Philips that outsourcing these jobs is just plain wrong. These workers are fighting tooth and nail for everything they've helped build. Can yo

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prh123@live.com in Grand Rapids, Michigan

40 months ago

How many CEOs does it take to screw over lighting fixture plant workers?
Just one.
Tell Philips Global's CEO: Don't outsource U.S. jobs after taking our stimulus money!

$7 million. That's how much America's taxpayers gave Philips Global in stimulus funds to continue investing in U.S. manufacturing jobs.
But Philips would rather take the money and run.
Philips is about to close one of its most profitable lighting plants, leaving 275 workers in Sparta, Tennessee, jobless and an entire community devastated. Where are those jobs going? Mexico.
The attacks on middle class jobs in Wisconsin and other states have galvanized Americans to stand up against shameful moves like this. Now these workers need our help.
Tell Philips' CEO: Keep the lights on in Sparta, Tennessee, and keep good jobs in America!
The union workers who make Philips lighting fixtures in Sparta have been doing things right for 40 years. They're committed, hardworking, and excellent at their jobs. In fact, their plant was named one of North America's 10 best in 2009 by Industry Week Magazine and even won Philips' own "lean" manufacturing award last fall.
And it's not as though Philips is a sinking ship. The company is a giant in the electronics industry, and profits in its lighting division are skyrocketing.1 There's no plausible argument for destroying these jobs.
That's why Scott Vincent, a 33-year veteran of the Philips plant, was so blindsided by the company's move. "I think Philips feels that we are just a number and that they can take what they've got here and plug it in anywhere, but they can't. We're a group of people with the experience and know-how to make this place run."
Scott and his coworkers, along with community and small business leaders, elected officials, and workers' rights activists, are working together to convince Philips that outsourcing these jobs is just plain wrong. These workers are fighting tooth and nail for everything they've helped build. Can you help them

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p in Sunnyvale, California

36 months ago

Host said: What do you think -- is this company going to survive and thrive? Are they looking to expand their staff, or do you think layoffs are inevitable?

How does Philips stack up against the competition?

Layoffs are happening as we speak. 10% of workforce.

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Raul in Andover, Massachusetts

33 months ago

Host said: What do you think -- is this company going to survive and thrive? Are they looking to expand their staff, or do you think layoffs are inevitable?

How does Philips stack up against the competition?

Philips has new leadership which is resulting in a lot of positive changes but a few safety steps to get to the point of reinvestment in the business and growth. Whilst there will always be some layoffs at a company of this size it is part of a longer term plan to get the company consistently performing well again for shareholders and ultimately growth in a fairly short time frame. The leadership has also launched a new set of behaviors that will remove a lot of red tape and cultivate a more entrepreneurial and innovative culture. They remain grounded in their strong commitment to ethics, sustainability and improving lives with solution across all 3 businesses. Not something every company can say these days!

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Raul in Andover, Massachusetts

33 months ago

Philips has new leadership which is resulting in a lot of positive changes but a few safety steps to get to the point of reinvestment in the business and growth. Whilst there will always be some layoffs at a company of this size it is part of a longer term plan to get the company consistently performing well again for shareholders and ultimately growth in a fairly short time frame. The leadership has also launched a new set of behaviors that will remove a lot of red tape and cultivate a more entrepreneurial and innovative culture. They remain grounded in their strong commitment to ethics, sustainability and improving lives with solution across all 3 businesses. Not something every company can say these days!

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Former employee in Chesapeake, Virginia

32 months ago

PHILIPS has become GE Jr. They're totally cost focused not customer focused. Their medical devices are innovative but unreliable and of poor quality. They don't care about their customers and care even less about their employees. Their gross profit margins are high, but their net profits are low. The company has become a bloated beurocracy. They skimp on their front-line employees while adding more backoffice personnel. They're penny wise but pound foolish. The employee moral is low and managers have become petty dictators. The pay is average. They demand too much of their employees. There's no work life balance.

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