My experience at Robert Half

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Tech WoW in Florida

74 months ago

After spending over 3 years with RHI (a considerable amount of time by their standards) I can give you a very honest account of my experience with the company.

When I was hired at RHI I had little to absolutely zero experience in staffing and I was given an opportunity to learn from one of the top staffing companies in the world. The training program at the time was little more than shadowing other employees for a few days then hopping on the phone. The training program now consists of a binder of information to read by yourself, at your desk, for a week. I took it upon myself to be dedicated to the profession I chose. After hours, I began by studying terminology, certifications, and hot trends in order to be able to speak professionally with candidates and clients. Eventually I hosted public speaking events, joined trade organizations, and got very involved in local business events.

The first thing I experienced was the expectations the company put on me almost immediately. There is essentially a 3-6 month grace period that RHI will give new employees to get a business going. I didn't wait around for the business to come to me, I hit the ground running opening new accounts and got the people on billing. I hit the numbers expected of me each week which are outlined in their "recipe for success". By my 6th month I was well on my way to building a successful business.

The next thing I experienced was turnover. And oh was there turnover. RHI likes to clean house once every 8 months or so and I saw 3 generations of completely new branch employees who were hired and fired/quit during my time there. This included management, administrative staff, and co-workers in every division (AT, OT, RHT, MR, TCG, etc). The “recipe for success” does not include an ingredient for team building, rather team re-building.

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Tech WoW in Florida

74 months ago

The next thing was changing of the commission structure (Pay Plans). When I was initially hired we had an aggressive commission structure which allowed people the comfort of a nice base salary along with an attainable bonus plan. I always thought that no one would ever do this job without a high earning potential. I saw 2 commission structure changes during my tenure with RHI. Each plan was designed to be harder than the next for employees to bonus or even maintain what you made the previous year. Eventually they told the top producers they would have to do over 30% more than they did the year before just to break even with what they took home the previous year. Imagine the audacity of a regional manager having that conversation with you. When the going got tough, management didn’t look at their own failures as why the numbers weren’t continuing to grow, they decided to take it out of the pocket of the people who were actually earning the revenue for the company. They do a horrible job of outlining the pay plans and they just hope that their employees won’t figure out that they have to bring in over $20,000 in gross margin per month just to cover the draw they were forced into.

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Tech WoW in Florida

74 months ago

Management is a massive failure at RHI. And this is at every level. The daily negative meetings, threatening conference calls, and cold stares when district level managers waltzed through the floor to make sure you were on the phone. I guess it takes an awful lot of plastic surgery to be able to look themselves in the mirror. Their managerial strategy is fear. Fear that your head was always on the chopping block whether you were under-performing or a top producer. Since they turned the staff over with such consistency, senior management never had to get to know the people who’s lives they were drastically effecting. No company sponsored Holiday parties, or softball teams, or family picnics equals never having to meet the spouse and children of the employee who’s teeth you’re drilling everyday. Picking up the tab on a few beers at a non-organized happy hour doesn’t score you many points.

The fear they instilled, along with their expectations, penny pinching and turnover, was the culture that I experienced at RHI. This is not a company that you can ever be comfortable working for. Yes, it’s a sales environment, and I had no issue with the production standards, which I always met. What I did not appreciate was the manner in which I was treated and the treatment of others.

Senior management looks at the employees as easily replaceable, interchangeable parts. RHI is a machine that cares only for the bottom line and has no feelings for the individuals that keep it running. I’ll never forget seeing seasoned adults (men and women) break down into tears from the pressure placed on them. Senior management is why their stock price is down almost 50% from what it was 2 years ago.

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Tech WoW in Florida

74 months ago

I took advantage of the opportunity that I was given at RHI and I did very well income wise during my time. When I left I was on top, and I left on my own terms. I will never forget my experience at RHI, the good and the bad but I must say, it was pure bliss watching them scramble like the cockroaches they are the day I resigned.

I’ll leave you with one last point. If you are currently considering working there or even a current employee dealing with the dilemma of being locked into the job with golden handcuffs , just ask yourself, is driving a BMW 745 worth the death of your soul?

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socrgryl in Katy, Texas

70 months ago

I'm glad I found this forum for a few reasons. My fiance just got a call from a recruiter in Houston from Accountemps to talk to him about possibly coming on board as a recruiter. I told him to research everything (good and bad) before making any further decisions to talk to them.

I've been assigned to a few positions through OT off and on for roughly 6yrs. My first assignment, was a nightmare. The girl I was taking over for had been 'promoted' bc the exec assistant HAD COMMITTED SUICIDE THE NIGHT BEFORE. I couldn't make this up even if I tried to. Well, I called the OT office I had been placed through and told them the situation. They shrugged it off and for some stupid reason I stayed lol. Oh to be young again. After a couple of weeks, I was asked to "not return" because they (OT) had "issues" with the company's "financial stability". I was ok with that under the circumstances, and I was eventually placed at a position where I stayed at for 4 years.

My second encounter with them was way more recent (2006). I dealt with the same recruiter I had dealt with in 2002 (surprisingly) and I was offered the front desk coordinator position at one of their branches. The "AIP" numbering system they used was ridiculous. I didn't feel comfortable judging ppl based on them saying "hello" or by their age. I was also asked by one of their recruiters to 'cold call' potential clients and act as if I knew the HR contact's email, (but didn't) and try to trick them into giving me information.

I had very little training, and beyond interacting with other candidates, I was pretty much excluded/ignored by the staff. Their lead admin was HORENDOUS and just not a nice person in general. I saw on a few occassions, where potential candidates were spoken to rudely and just out right mean. I am glad I left there pretty quickly and found something somewhere else.

I figured that things might have just been isolated, but it's insane to see that its' something so common!

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