southern california edison Interview Questions.

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It's always hard to know what to expect when going in for that interview -- and preparation can make all the difference. What is the interview process like at southern california edison?

Any advice on striking the right note?

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Gerry Ansel in Fullerton, California

42 months ago

Listen up, people. SCE LOVES to conduct behavior-based panel interviews. They rarely ask about your background or experience, because they can get that info from your resume or application. What they really want to find out is how you think and act "in the moment" and if what's on your resume aligns with your true abilities. But never fear, it IS possible to prepare for this type of interview. Visit www.quintcareers.com/interview_question_database/jobseeker_behavioral.html and run through the practice questions. These are questions that are typically asked in a behavior-based interviews.

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Ruby in Los Angeles, California

30 months ago

Gerry Ansel in Fullerton, California said: Listen up, people. SCE LOVES to conduct behavior-based panel interviews. They rarely ask about your background or experience, because they can get that info from your resume or application. What they really want to find out is how you think and act "in the moment" and if what's on your resume aligns with your true abilities. But never fear, it IS possible to prepare for this type of interview. Visit www.quintcareers.com/interview_question_database/jobseeker_behavioral.html and run through the practice questions. These are questions that are typically asked in a behavior-based interviews.

For what position did you interview with SCE? I have interview tommorrow for Admin Asst position with SCE and I am nervous because I really want and need this job and I have been informed from the agency recruiter that they are hard. I will check out this link you posted. Please give me some more pointers.

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Ruby in Los Angeles, California

30 months ago

Gerry Ansel in Fullerton, California said: Listen up, people. SCE LOVES to conduct behavior-based panel interviews. They rarely ask about your background or experience, because they can get that info from your resume or application. What they really want to find out is how you think and act "in the moment" and if what's on your resume aligns with your true abilities. But never fear, it IS possible to prepare for this type of interview. Visit www.quintcareers.com/interview_question_database/jobseeker_behavioral.html and run through the practice questions. These are questions that are typically asked in a behavior-based interviews.

For what position did you interview with SCE? I have interview tommorrow for Admin Asst position with SCE and I am nervous because I really want and need this job and I have been informed from the agency recruiter that they are hard. I will check out this link you posted. Please give me some more pointers.

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Gerry Ansel in Fullerton, California

30 months ago

Hi Ruby,

I worked as a Corporate Communications Manager at Southern California Edison from 2006 to 2010. My interviews for the position were conducted in the conventional, question-and-answer format (e.g., "what did you do at ABC company," "what are your greatest strengths and weaknesses," etc.). There was an interview with the hiring director and four of his reports, as well as one with his manager (the SVP of Corporate Communications) and my senior-most internal client (the VP of Information Technology). It was actually pretty easy.

The company didn't start using the behavior-based interview format until two years into my tenure. Around that time, they also issued a mandate that all internal candidates had to compete for jobs with candidates from the outside, and hiring managers could no longer select their own candidates - everyone interviewed had to be selected by Corporate Staffing. That killed company morale, because it sent everyone the message that your tenure with the company holds no value, and the company was not interested in supporting you as you build your career there.

The best advice I can give you, Ruby, is to go through the exercises on the Web site mentioned in my post. If you go through three or four of them, your answers will be crisp, direct and to the point (they like that), and you will be better prepared for any question they may ask you. Also, be prepared to ask a lot of questions - questions that show you already know something about what the work group does.

The other important thing is to make a contact at the company. Be sure to get everyone's business cards, and add those people to your LinkedIn network. You want to stay in touch with them. Even if you aren't selected for the job, they might need you for another role further down the line, or may know of other companies that do now.

Best of luck,

Gerry

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Gerry Ansel in Fullerton, California

30 months ago

Hi Ruby,

I worked as a Corporate Communications Manager at Southern California Edison from 2006 to 2010. My interviews for the position were conducted in the conventional, question-and-answer format (e.g., "what did you do at ABC company," "what are your greatest strengths and weaknesses," etc.). There was an interview with the hiring director and four of his reports, as well as one with his manager (the SVP of Corporate Communications) and my senior-most internal client (the VP of Information Technology). It was actually pretty easy.

The company didn't start using the behavior-based interview format until two years into my tenure. Around that time, they also issued a mandate that all internal candidates had to compete for jobs with candidates from the outside, and hiring managers could no longer select their own candidates - everyone interviewed had to be selected by Corporate Staffing. That killed company morale, because it sent everyone the message that your tenure with the company holds no value, and the company was not interested in supporting you as you build your career there.

The best advice I can give you, Ruby, is to go through the exercises on the Web site mentioned in my post. If you go through three or four of them, your answers will be crisp, direct and to the point (they like that), and you will be better prepared for any question they may ask you. Also, be prepared to ask a lot of questions - questions that show you already know something about what the work group does.

The other important thing is to make a contact at the company. Be sure to get everyone's business cards, and add those people to your LinkedIn network. You want to stay in touch with them. Even if you aren't selected for the job, they might need you for another role further down the line, or may know of other companies that do now.

Best of luck,

Gerry

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Joanna in Anaheim, California

2 months ago

Ruby in Los Angeles, California said: For what position did you interview with SCE? I have interview tommorrow for Admin Asst position with SCE and I am nervous because I really want and need this job and I have been informed from the agency recruiter that they are hard. I will check out this link you posted. Please give me some more pointers.

I have an interview with sce this week and want to find out how your experience went...? Any tips? Did you get the job?

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