What's the company culture at URS?

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Host

Every business has it's own style. What is the office environment and culture like at URS?

Are people dressed in business casual, jeans and t-shirts, or full-on suits? Do folks get together for Friday happy hours and friendly get-togethers?

What is a typical day in the life of an employee at URS?

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Trae in Pitts, Georgia

105 months ago

As a former Industrial Hygienist for URS, I wouldn't recommend them for employment. They are driven by the phrase "Billable Hours", and when you aren't billable, you get laid off, and chances are that it's a permanent lay off.

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John Doerr in New York

104 months ago

See my other two comments on URS=Joke and How to get a job

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dee in Mount Airy, Maryland

104 months ago

I wouldnt recomend this company or its partner company EG&G to anyone, they do lay off when they've used you up.

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dee in Mount Airy, Maryland

104 months ago

Host said: Every business has it's own style. What is the office environment and culture like at URS?

Are people dressed in business casual, jeans and t-shirts, or full-on suits? Do folks get together for Friday happy hours and friendly get-togethers?

What is a typical day in the life of an employee at URS?

they do nothing for the employees.

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Genesee in Buffalo in Spring Brook, New York

104 months ago

The company culture encourages abusing employees, underpaying them, using them up, and laying them off the minute they aren't as billable as they used to be. Experienced employees aren't looked upon as assets with accumulated knowledge and contacts; they are expensive liabilities to be done away with in any way possible, as quickly as possible, unless they've flattered the right people. Employees, particularly on the service side of the house, are viewed merely as numbers at best and necessary evils at worst.

Salaries, benefits, holidays, and travel allowances are all substandard. Trying to get a raise that even slightly outpaces inflation and the yearly hike in insurance costs is a futile exercise.

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dee in Mount Airy, Maryland

104 months ago

I see you've worked there!!!..you know all the ins and outs and know that if you are male, and kiss the right places, you just may go some place.

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Robert in Madison, Mississippi

104 months ago

Trae in Pitts, Georgia said: As a former Industrial Hygienist for URS, I wouldn't recommend them for employment. They are driven by the phrase "Billable Hours", and when you aren't billable, you get laid off, and chances are that it's a permanent lay off.

I hate to spring this on you, but that is what consulting is all about. If you can charge out your time, you get to eat. Stay in the office cracking jokes all day long, and the charity dries up quickly.

From big companies (I have not worked at URS so I am not talking specifically about them), to small companies, your continued billability and profitability drive your career security.

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jr in Austin, Texas

102 months ago

Robert in Madison, Mississippi said: I hate to spring this on you, but that is what consulting is all about. If you can charge out your time, you get to eat. Stay in the office cracking jokes all day long, and the charity dries up quickly.

From big companies (I have not worked at URS so I am not talking specifically about them), to small companies, your continued billability and profitability drive your career security.

SPOKEN LIKE A TRUE MANAGER. . .

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Genesee in Orchard Park, New York

102 months ago

Robert in Madison, Mississippi said: I hate to spring this on you, but that is what consulting is all about. If you can charge out your time, you get to eat. Stay in the office cracking jokes all day long, and the charity dries up quickly.

From big companies (I have not worked at URS so I am not talking specifically about them), to small companies, your continued billability and profitability drive your career security.

In theory, I agree with you; if someone isn't contributing for a significant period of time, something should be done to rectify this. However, URS has a history of conducting knee-jerk layoffs without looking into the causes of light workload. What if the employee has many years of dedicated service and a ton of experience and he or she is momentarily idle through no fault of their own, but rather because of the actions of their managers? Wouldn't it be in the company's best interest to look objectively at the situation and try to adapt a proven, experienced employee to another assignment rather than throw them away like garbage due to factors beyond their control? Isn't it in the company's best interest, long-term, to retain this type of employee? After all, a consulting firm's stock in trade is personnel, expertise, and knowledge and you can't offer something you cast aside indiscriminately.

Also, shouldn't years of loyalty and hard work count for something when the chips are down? Refusing to acknowledge it seems like a self-destructive policy to me. How can a firm expect loyalty from its workforce when none is offered to them in return?

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jr in Austin, Texas

102 months ago

Genesee in Orchard Park, New York said: In theory, I agree with you; if someone isn't contributing for a significant period of time, something should be done to rectify this. However, URS has a history of conducting knee-jerk layoffs without looking into the causes of light workload. What if the employee has many years of dedicated service and a ton of experience and he or she is momentarily idle through no fault of their own, but rather because of the actions of their managers? Wouldn't it be in the company's best interest to look objectively at the situation and try to adapt a proven, experienced employee to another assignment rather than throw them away like garbage due to factors beyond their control? Isn't it in the company's best interest, long-term, to retain this type of employee? After all, a consulting firm's stock in trade is personnel, expertise, and knowledge and you can't offer something you cast aside indiscriminately.

Also, shouldn't years of loyalty and hard work count for something when the chips are down? Refusing to acknowledge it seems like a self-destructive policy to me. How can a firm expect loyalty from its workforce when none is offered to them in return?

No, because in order to do that (look objectively at the situation and try to adapt a proven, experienced employee to another assignment rather than throw them away like garbage due to factors beyond their control) they would have to care, when it's so much easier, much less work for them, and cheaper for them to just get rid of you. . .

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Houston Pro in Houston, Texas

79 months ago

Working at URS was the worst experience I had in my 30 year career. Suckups and politicians thrive at URS engineering. Cronyism and nepotism are rife and unfettered. I advise no one with self respect and personal integrity apply. It comes as no surprise that most of the work awarded to the Houston office has been yanked by the clients.

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