VOLT.....Resume Collector Nothin More

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Comments (13)

Kevin in Long Island City, New York

86 months ago

Dealing with this agency is a waste, they never reply and all they do is collect resume "Do They Have Jobs?"

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Kaye from Chicago in Chicago, Illinois

86 months ago

I have the same question Kevin....I would also add what do they do with all of the information they receive?

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I agree in Elyria, Ohio

84 months ago

I agree they do nothing at all but waste our time.

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Leo in Orange, California

84 months ago

What is the value of "collecting" resumes? None!
Keep in mind that any job posting receives 100s of resumes and each job posting usually represents one job opportunity. To get your qualifications noticed and to be considered for the opportunity before others are. Call your local Volt office. Mention the job posting and how your qualifications match. Then ask “What is the best way that I can be considered for the job as soon as possible.” Follow the instructions you’re given and treat each step in the process in the same way that you do when applying directly to a hiring company.

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Yoda in Sammamish, Washington

35 months ago

If you really want to use Volt then make sure you quote them a low rate. Volt submits resumes to their clients sorted by lowest cost to them. They want to maximize the profits they receive.

So, quote them a low rate. Get the interview. Get the job offer. Then renegotiate the rate with Volt.

Ideally get the name(s) of the hiring individuals so you can contact them directly if need be to put preasure on Volt to cough up more money.

You have to play hardball with Volt.

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Roger in Lynnwood, Washington

20 months ago

Yoda in Sammamish, Washington said: If you really want to use Volt then make sure you quote them a low rate. Volt submits resumes to their clients sorted by lowest cost to them. They want to maximize the profits they receive.

So, quote them a low rate. Get the interview. Get the job offer. Then renegotiate the rate with Volt.

Ideally get the name(s) of the hiring individuals so you can contact them directly if need be to put preasure on Volt to cough up more money.

You have to play hardball with Volt.

As a Recruiter with Volt, I would recommend against that approach. There are several reasons not to take that method.
1. It harms your integrity with the client. Upon renegotation, I have to let the client know, and 99% of clients become unhappy hearing candidates renegotiating.
2. It lacks integrity to the staffing company. I personally do not renegotiate and would pull the job offer.

Also, what you say is not true, there is no stack rank based on pay. It's a large stack of factors which come down to experience, personality match/team match, and passion for the role.

Personally, as a recruiter for software developers, I know if someone quotes me $40 an hour they are low balling me to get in the door and I won't do it, so I increase their pay to the market rate and we lock in understanding there will be no further negotiation.

I hope you reconsider your ways, and see the harm that causes to your professional integrity.

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Terry in Renton in Renton, Washington

17 months ago

Roger in Lynnwood, Washington said: As a Recruiter with Volt, I would recommend against that approach. There are several reasons not to take that method.
...

I've recently re-entered the market and received an inquiry (Job opening) from a Volt rep with the "RTR" statement at the bottom. Since my last position through Volt was quite lengthy I had never encountered this verbiage before - so I searched for "Right to Represent" and discovered the new rules when working with some larger employers - one of them being a limit to the number of referrals that Volt can submit.

If I am in a position to contact (apply to) their client directly, what are the possible advantages of working through Volt?

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Roger

17 months ago

Terry in Renton in Renton, Washington said: I've recently re-entered the market and received an inquiry (Job opening) from a Volt rep with the "RTR" statement at the bottom. Since my last position through Volt was quite lengthy I had never encountered this verbiage before - so I searched for "Right to Represent" and discovered the new rules when working with some larger employers - one of them being a limit to the number of referrals that Volt can submit.

If I am in a position to contact (apply to) their client directly, what are the possible advantages of working through Volt?

Hi Terry,
First off let me say this is just my opinion and not the opinion of my company. That said, if you are apply to work directly with the client on a direct hire position and avoid the contract, for something they have posted on their website, go for it! Just be open with your recruiter about what you have and have not applied for. You don't want to be "double submitted".

That sounds like a different situation than the above :)

But if you're being put in for a contract, most employers in my experience would want the candidate to work though their recruiter for the screening process, as that's what they pay us for - i.e. the work of arranging for an interview, screening, finding a candidate, etc. I've had a couple of candidates go directly to the client (not many) and it backfired on them, with the client feeling they were difficult to work with.

Hope that helps! And hopefully someday you get to work with more honest recruiters so you don't feel like you have to play hardball just to get a fair rate :)

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Terry in Renton in Washington

17 months ago

Thanks for your comment, Roger
I've engaged the client through Volt and did some probing on the rate and didn't get very far.
I'm hoping that if an offer is made then that may be a more appropriate time to haggle - I've read that their margins are usually quite good and that there is usually room to get at least a $3-6 increase.

Your comment about more honest recruiters is somewhat puzzling. Do you still work at Volt? Or are you saying that some recruiters at Volt are more honest than others?

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Roger

17 months ago

No, I was referring to a general feeling I had gathered of a lack of trust for recruiters, and was hoping for a better experience for you in the future.
I always do rate negotiations up front, and I like to give more than people ask to make sure they're happy, whenever possible.

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Terry in Renton in Washington

17 months ago

Wasn't necessarily a lack of trust, just that I have some insight into their margin - I'm all for making them some money but it should be fair and equitable for all concerned.
An unwillingness to budge on the rate was somewhat frustrating and I was considering playing hardball (with a second vendor, actually) but didn't go down that path for a number of reasons.
Wish me luck!

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Teodoro Piña in Tucson, Arizona

14 months ago

Available Upon Request

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MzStone in Tacoma, Washington

13 months ago

Roger in Lynnwood, Washington said: As a Recruiter with Volt, I would recommend against that approach. There are several reasons not to take that method.
1. It harms your integrity with the client. Upon renegotation, I have to let the client know, and 99% of clients become unhappy hearing candidates renegotiating.
2. It lacks integrity to the staffing company. I personally do not renegotiate and would pull the job offer.

Also, what you say is not true, there is no stack rank based on pay. It's a large stack of factors which come down to experience, personality match/team match, and passion for the role.

Personally, as a recruiter for software developers, I know if someone quotes me $40 an hour they are low balling me to get in the door and I won't do it, so I increase their pay to the market rate and we lock in understanding there will be no further negotiation.

I hope you reconsider your ways, and see the harm that causes to your professional integrity.

Rodger,
I'm glad that I found your post,I have some questions for you since you are a recruiter for Volt,
1 Is it normal for only be placed on one assignment?
2 Is it normal for when I call to talk to the recruiter that was assigned (Auburn Volt)to me not to call back and I have left multiple voice mails or reply to emails that I have sent?
3 If an assignment turned down due to that it was too far away from where I live that your not call for any more?

I am beginning not to trust staffing agency's I have worked with total 3,currently I am with the 4th staffing agency I really doubt that it is going to work out, I do everything that I am asked to do, I called in to my current and for Monday their client only need 4 temps not 100 like they thought that would need.
I understand that I am not the only one in need of employment, the only that I am concerned about is me and mine, I get it that the current job market is not good, BUT do not promise what can not be delivered.

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