How to get a job at Wolters Kluwer.

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Host

Do you work at Wolters Kluwer? How did you find the job? How did you get that first interview?

Any advice for someone trying to get in?

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Noreen Davis in Chicago, Illinois

88 months ago

If you're interested in working for WK in the USA, know that once you apply for a position on the WK web site, you are *almost guaranteed* to receive a call from one of their contract recruiters located in Illinois. The company won't use any kind of pre-screening technique on their web site. Thus, unless you are obviously unqualified (e.g., janitor applying for job in Finance), you *will* quickly get that call from the recruiter. This means that you *should not*, in any way, construe the call as a genuine expression of interest in you. Wrong. They call *everybody*.

They'll say that they want to set-up a pre-screening call in coming days to talk for about 10 minutes. That call usually lasts about 6-7 minutes, is comprised of 8-10 questions, and then they tell you that if they're interested in you, they'll let you know. Most of the time, in 2-3 days, you'll get an e-mail saying, "...after a more in depth review of your resume, we have decided to move forward with other candidates." If you'll watch the job you applied for on the WK web site, you will discover that months and months will pass and the job remains. The fact is, they really had nobody else to pursue, however, they rejected you because they were never genuinely interested at all. Oh yes, they'll ask you what your salary expectation is and if you're out of the range (which they won't tell you), they act like nothing is wrong but you're kaput.

WK is a lot like United Health Group: The contract recruiters are located in one central location (Ill. for WK, Minn. for UHG), do all their work by telephone, and are gatekeepers to hiring managers. Mostly, the hiring managers *never* see candidate resumes until HR has "approved" the candidate. Imagine, you're a hiring manager located at WK in San Diego, you have a position to fill, and you must wait as long as necessary for HR to allow you to look at any resumes. Meanwhile, the work piles up.

A bureaucratic company with high turnover and few placements.

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A_B_845 in New York, New York

88 months ago

I have noted the same tendency with WKUSA as seen by others -- AIG is another good example of it. It's not unique, and the end result is that you spend an immense amount of time entertaining an organization who has nothing better to do than "window shop" for candidates with no intention of buying. They also continue to advert the same role for months. My reply is not sour-grapes, however -- I'd really rather know this from the outset than too late in the game.

Had their answer been more candid, such as "you're a bit above our compensation targets" or "your experience is a little senior for the role" or "we're seeking more specific background in X, Y or Z, would you happen to know anyone you'd be kind enough to recommend", I'm happy to network. But if their game is to not be so professional or organized, it removes any motivation to be helpful. Sadly, too many companies are this way of late.

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keyboardsavant in Burnsville, Minnesota

88 months ago

This isn't germane to the question of how to get a job at WKUSA, but I have to say -- A_B_845's comment is so well-written, it was a delight to read. I usually avoid forums like this in an effort to resist my baser grammar-nazi inclinations, but boy howdy, that comment was both informative and pleasantly conversational. (Do I infer correctly from the patois that A_B_845 is a Brit?)

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dmill in Coolidge, Arizona

87 months ago

"window shop" is an apt description. I have twice been handled this way by UnitedHealth Group and once by Wolters Kluwer.

For WK, the questions were:
1. Can you legally work in the US?
2. Do you hold the degree as you already stated in your resume?
3. Describe your day-to-day work at your most recent employer (a standard question from UHG also).
4. How many years of experience do you have for the current position?
5. How much of your experience has been related to <insert specific part of job for which you've applied>.
6. Tell me about your experience with Medicare (the position I applied for had some connection apparently).
7. Are you familiar with the Waterfall and Agile methods of software development (this was related to the job)?
8. How large (measured by budget) of projects have you managed?
9. Can you use Microsoft Project?
10. Why are you interested in this position?
11. What salary level are you looking for?

The call lasted about six minutes. The recruiter was < Name Removed > (a contract recruiter for WK <Location Removed>). I applied in mid-Aug. 2007 and as of mid-Oct. 2007, the job is still listed on the WK web site.
< Name Removed > certainly didn't sell me on the company. The attitude was more like: You'll be lucky if we decide to offer you the opportunity to join our fine organization. Same old corporate bravado, same old arrogant people.

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MARixon in Charlotte, North Carolina

86 months ago

Another reason that larger U.S. employers are increasingly "window shopping" for job candidates is that they are actually collecting "evidence" for their real agenda: Hiring foreign workers (typically technology-savvy individuals from India) using the U.S. federal government's H1B visa program.

The way it often works:
1. Advertise the jobs (usually in high tech.) with *very* stringent and wide-ranging "requirements." The objective is to make it impossible for any U.S.-based applicant to be able to fulfill all of the "requirements."
2. Collect “evidence” of unqualified applicants/applications and even results from interviews where applicants were considered unqualified.
3. After several months and the gathering of enough "evidence of inability to find qualified candidates", proceed with the H1B process.

The end result is far lower cost non-U.S. citizen workers willing to tolerate conditions and situations that most U.S.-based (aka U.S. citizens) would not tolerate. A good deal for the company and stockholders so long as other critical business factors stay the same (read: maintain the pro-business government status quo).

One company that has proven skillful at this process is the package delivery service that is a competitor to the "brown company." Their name rhymes with "we-ate-gel".

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wkrecruiter in Roselle, Illinois

86 months ago

As a recruiter with WK, I feel I have to defend myself and my fellow recruiters...I myseld am not a contractor, yet am based in Illinois. We are much like an agency or search firm that one goes to. Most of the firms are not located in the general vicinity of the comapny that they are hiring for.

Yes, a reply does go out, mostly so you as the candidate knows that your resume has gone through and you are not left wondering...

Why are we the gatekeepers? Well, when over 100 resumes come in for one job, it is our duty to screen out those candidates that are not qualified, not the "janitors", but those that have the wrong degree, wrong length of experience, etc.

We are not posting positions to hire "foreign workers", but rather "qualified workers" and our managers do get to see candidates, even if they are out of the salary range. Our goal is to fill a position with a qualified candidate. If you are qualified and a little out of the range, our hiring managers may have that room.

Just needed to defend the recruiters out there who work diligently and hard.

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Kat in Frederick, Maryland

85 months ago

Host said: Do you work at Wolters Kluwer? How did you find the job? How did you get that first interview?

Any advice for someone trying to get in?

I recently applied for a position at WK and find that your comments are remarkably accurate. Frustrated in Frederick.

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smithers jones in Greenwich, Connecticut

81 months ago

What you say is correct, it is a rather cold company. I made it through the initial HR gatekeeper and actually spoke to the hiring manager in a phone interview. It was obvious from moment one she had no interest in hiring me or even having me come in to the office for an interview and was desperate to get off the phone. Then why conduct the interview?

S/he actually asked me before the interview started to recite the job description to make it sure it was the same job (how incredibly pedantic and unprofessional!). I left a few words out the page job description so she pounced on those and couldn't wait to tell me how unqualified for the position I was. It was a just a waste of my time and this kind of gatekeeping should be performed via e-mail.

This person seemed delighted to have gotten rid of me so quickly. I think this interviewer keeps a timer by their phone to see how quickly they can end an interview.

This person was just about rudest person with whom I have ever interviewed. Good riddance!

So don't feel bad if they don't respond to you, they are doing you a favor.

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alfonso in Chicago, Illinois

80 months ago

WK is moving a lot of its work to India. Sad but a sign of the times.

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Chuck in Bellmore, New York

71 months ago

well I guess they changed tactics either after reading some posts like this or just due to the economy where I think they will get more like 500 resumes for a posted job instead of the 100 quoted a year ago.

Sadly I did not even get a screening call even though I had an internal connection ( director level) who knew the hiring manager well and made the introduction for me.

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CK829 in Katy, Texas

47 months ago

wkrecruiter in Roselle, Illinois said: As a recruiter with WK, I feel I have to defend myself and my fellow recruiters...I myseld am not a contractor, yet am based in Illinois. We are much like an agency or search firm that one goes to. Most of the firms are not located in the general vicinity of the comapny that they are hiring for.

Yes, a reply does go out, mostly so you as the candidate knows that your resume has gone through and you are not left wondering...

Why are we the gatekeepers? Well, when over 100 resumes come in for one job, it is our duty to screen out those candidates that are not qualified, not the "janitors", but those that have the wrong degree, wrong length of experience, etc.

We are not posting positions to hire "foreign workers", but rather "qualified workers" and our managers do get to see candidates, even if they are out of the salary range. Our goal is to fill a position with a qualified candidate. If you are qualified and a little out of the range, our hiring managers may have that room.

Just needed to defend the recruiters out there who work diligently and hard.

I'm a recruiteer myself, so I know very well what our job is to do..but with WK, the recruiter called, we walked for 40 minutes...I thought the interview went great, he told me that he would check the head lady in HR's calendar and get back with me, but he never did, the interview was over 2 weeks ago...so with that being said, that was just rude! There is no reason not to get back with someone....Even if she was busy, he could've emailed and said, "She's busy, but we're still interested...." or "We've decided to not have the second phone call", something! I even emailed to inquire about it, one week later, and he didn't even return the email. What is up with that?

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rockstar in Bealeton, Virginia

42 months ago

There's something terribly odd with Wolters Kluwer. I almost feel as if they are a scam just trying to collect personal data or something. I also interacted with one of their recruiters and we had scheduled a pnone interview appointment. Guess what? She never called and never e-mailed. What kind of recruiters do that, unless they're up to something other than scouting for potential talents. I just hope they would quit reposting the generic Associate Customer Service Specialist position; It's a waste of jobseekers' time.

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KEITHJWOLFE in Saint Cloud, Minnesota

34 months ago

I am glad and thank the people who put the time into responding. I am very frustrated. i met all the requirements, and not even an email.

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Their Loss in Cleveland, Ohio

22 months ago

Similar to a few of the other reviewers who have posted in this particular forum, I had a rather less than impressive experience with one of WK's Senior Recruiting Consultants. Unlike other reviewers though, I don't believe there is any type of scam going on. This pertains more to competency.

Upon applying for a position, I was contacted through email by this Recruiting Consultant, located on the west coast (San Diego area code). She rescheduled the time almost immediately upon our initial confirmation, which was fine. However, it was what happened next that I found to be unprofessional. Her interview call came, though it was more than 30 minutes late. She pronounced my first name (not a tough one either) incorrectly. I can understand that last part, so I gently corrected her and obtained no apologies for either the late call or mispronunciation. She then proceeded to tell me that she wasn't sure of the time we had scheduled (isn't it a crucial part of her job to be on top of this kind of detail?) and she asked to reschedule. We agreed to speak again, an hour and a half later. Except, no call ever came and no further communique from her either. If this experience is representative of what it is like to work for Wolters Kluwer, then I say no thanks. I sincerely hope that other applicants have a better experience.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

22 months ago

I applied to WK for an Associate Customer Specialist some years ago. They never responded. A month ago a WK recruiter e-mailed me off my online resume.

I didn't recall the position I had applied for at first, but I fired back that I did not have the background WK needed - primarily because I saw "customer" in the job title. The recruiter fired back that I do.

Wolters Kluwer wasn't interested in me when I applied before. Why was it interested in me now? My quals haven't changed - not one iota.

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test in Massapequa, New York

20 months ago

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