Intel Salaries, Bonuses and Benefits.

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What are the average starting salaries, bonuses, benefits and travel requirements like at Intel?

What do you like best about working at Intel? Are there any great perks or special treats for employees?

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RCG in Irvine, California

95 months ago

Host said: What are the average starting salaries, bonuses, benefits and travel requirements like at Intel?
What do you like best about working at Intel? Are there any great perks or special treats for employees?

I will start the job next month and find out.

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Intel E-gent in Beaverton, Oregon

94 months ago

RCG said:
I will start the job next month and find out.

If stability is not as important as instantaneous gratification, you're going to be happy. The benefits are rapidly deteriorating (or being removed outright) and the 'Intel Culture' is just smoke in the wind. At least twice a year there are 'Headcount Reduction' and 'ReOrganization' traumas.. and now Intel is building a Fab in China~!

How well do you speak Chinese?

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Ex-Intel in Beaverton, Oregon

92 months ago

Intel is the premiere propaganda machine. The bad things that people said above are true, especially the fake "mission/values", which you should wear on your body at all times (around your neck, eg).

Intel was one of the first to export jobs to India, to import cheap labor, displacing US workers over time.

The HR organization is dominated by two buds who have been there WAY too long. When Intel was laying off (sorry: REDEPLOYING), these two maintained their two-in-a-box status: two people doing the job of one, while others were let go.

HR is also mostly female. At one point, 70% (may be higher now). Guys: be passive, be team players; otherwise, you will be labeled difficult to work with and passed over for promotions and higher-than-average year-end raises.

The CEO of the company is Bush-like; insiders know it. Research the stock price of Intel over the last few years, and you'll see. While Intel was laying off thousands of employees in 06 and the stock price was plummeting, he raked in nearly 10 mil compensation (see AFL-CIO corporate watch website).

Intel relentlessly talks of globalization, outsourcing, diversity (code for cheap labor), global economy: corporate INVENTIONS, which Intel helped hatch. While it professes to be fair and honest, it is busily setting up shop in Communist China known for human rights violations. Intel speaks with forked tongue, just like its pal in the White House.

You have no job security there: it's about who—not what—you know. At 50, watch out: you will be targeted for "job force reductions". Intel wants young and/or foreign workers:. CHEAP help. How many people have retired from Intel? Ask to see their records.

Label me disgruntled all you want. I know this company, and I know what they did to a lot of good people. I hope somebody takes them on one of these days.

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nwguy9 in Beaverton, Oregon

90 months ago

I echo the comments above. Even working there for 7 years and being laid off one month before my deserved sabbatical (2 month vacation) I got axed. never mind the fact I had 6 years of "exceeds expectations" on your annual reviews, called Focal.

One bad year with a bad manager who doesnt like you can quickly end your career. At least I got a severance package which is more than most get who end up in the 5 % IR Improvement Required category.

Avg salaries are 80-100k and your bonus which has been decreasing, can change your total pay or T-Comp as they call it.

Expect to travel a lot but be under scrutiny of a travel budget especially if you're in Field Sales. If you're in a division, endless mind numbing meetings, lots of powerpoints and a pressure cooker environment to compete rather than collaborate with your peers. Maybe the pressure cooker applies to corporate america but its amazing working outside of Intel where people want to work with you as opposed to "pushing back" so they can look better.

After 7 years there I agree with all of the above comments.

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TME in Hillsboro, Oregon

89 months ago

As another ex-Intel employee, also cut in 2006 with less than a year to my sabbatical, I too echo all of what people are saying above. Grabbing a few topics they have raised, here are my short comments:

INCOMPETENT MANAGERS: Intel had huge growth in the 2nd-half of the 90's and ended-up promoting people into management who had no business being there. I also strongly agree with the "fear and intimidation" as I was subject to that by 2 of the 4 Intel managers I worked for in my tenure.

RANKING & RATING (a.k.a. ranting & raving): Intel's way of creating a list of employees, sorted by perceived performance. It is highly subject to the old-boy network and brown-nosing.

FLASH MEMORY: That money-losing division was just sold-off.

STOCK OPTIONS: After my department was cut after I was an employee for 6+ years, I had to cash-in my options. Their net value was less than $2K.

CUBE FARMS: All employees, including the CEO, are in cubes as a theoretical symbol of equality. Just like in "Animal Farm", some classes of people are more equal than others. Big managers have bigger cubes -- by windows. A standard cube is 8x8, but many (most?) people survive in a so-called "compressed cubicle" of 5x8. Compressed cubicles were supposed to be a short-term solution when space is tight, but rarely did I see any cubicles "decompressed." The running joke is that "prisoners on death row have more space!"

HR: Don't think for a second they are there to help you -- they are just a mouthpiece for management. 'Nuff said....

<Continued on next message>

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TME in Hillsboro, Oregon

89 months ago

TRAVEL: I was not in the field, but travelled about 20%. It was not too bad unless I had to fly to another continent. When I 1st started with Intel, business class was OK, though I never had a chance to take it. Then it was coach-only anywhere. Eventually it changed back to business class -- for two weeks -- then changed it back to coach-only. On the plus-side though, Intel has a fleet of 37-passenger jets which fly between major campuses. It had it's share of abuses, but it sure beats fighting the crowds at airport terminals. Then again, they used to provide a brown-bag meal, then granola bars, and now just a small bottle of water, even if you are on a 6am flight which will last 3+ hours.

360-DEGREE FEEDBACK: An opportunity for your friends and co-workers to say great things about you and your work -- and way way for your competition and enemies to screw you. See RANKING & RATING.

WORK HOURS: Another telling joke: "What do you call leaving Intel at 5pm? A half-day."

RAISES: I recall my very first raise. I was told they WANTED to give me a 10% raise, but the budget for raises had been cut by half. They then said that only half the vaule of raises would be given at the normal time in the spring, and MAYBE the other half in the fall. Of course, the other half never happend. I earned a full raise and received only one-quarter of the amount.

QUARTERLIES: They are supposed to be a once/calendar quarter team-building activity. My very first one cost about $100 per person and it was great. The budget got cut to just $15 per person, not enough for two games of bowling and a beer. I once went 7 quarters without a quarterly, they were so lame.

I am sooooo glad to be aout of Intel....

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Sam_Logan in Tel Aviv-yafo, Israel

84 months ago

Intel is considered to be CSR (corporate social responsibility) oriented company. Seemingly it takes a good care of it's employees in terms of perks and professional development.

There are however a lot of complaints being heard about the quality of middle management... incompetent managers, etc.

I saw some interesting reviews of Intel workers at www.proletar.com

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Cadets in United Kingdom

78 months ago

Ex-Intel in Beaverton, Oregon said:
Label me disgruntled all you want. I know this company, and I know what they did to a lot of good people. I hope somebody takes them on one of these days.

Hey someone in the UK took them in the Court and won, see following links:

www.bailii.org/cgi-bin/markup.cgi?doc=/ew/cases/EWHC/QB/2006/1097.html&query=d+and+v+and+intel&method=boolean

www.bailii.org/cgi-bin/markup.cgi?doc=/ew/cases/EWCA/Civ/2007/70.html&query=daw+and+v+and+intel&method=boolean

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Big Guy in Lawnside, New Jersey

77 months ago

Hey folks.. Great blog. Wish there was more dirt on Intel made public. I worked there for five years after working for a small company that was later acquired by Intel. Intel completely destroyed the smaller company. It was very very sad to see. Fortunately it was sold off in 2006 and is now thriving again. I was very unhappy with Intel and I've always been an excellent-to-outstandingly rated employee in 20 years at previous companies. Intel is extremely arrogant and does not know how to treat people; people are very much a secondary issue for Intel. Only the largest shareholders down through the VP level are immune from the anxiety of the mean-spirited R&R. If you make it to the VP club, you're golden; otherwise watch your back. And arrogance for what? There's no innovation whatsoever. Intel does not understand innovation and TRUE risk taking, despite the platitudes about the Intel "value" of risk taking. The road stops at X86. They could take a few lessons from Steve Jobs. Intel is no way to live life... Life is too short to put up with cultures like Intel's. I love my new job AND company now. It feels like a family and I really WANT to contribute and push my performance higher. Nice to live without the fear of punishment and arbitrary layoffs.

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grindel in New York, New York

75 months ago

Dissenting opinion--I loved Intel. I worked there for 6 years and left of my own accord. I was a carpet-dweller. I'll try to be objective.

MANAGERS: I had two very bad managers. I also had four terrific managers who went out of their way to give me opportunities and help me direct my career toward skills I still use today. Intel asks you to "own your employability," and I live by that motto at every job I have.

PAY: I was ludicrously underpaid. Like folks above, I was told they "wanted" to pay me more, but were tied by budget constraints. I believe it, but went to a company that could pay me.

HR: HR never, ever works for the employee. The HR department is there to serve the company's legal interests. Ture at Intel, true everywhere.

VALUES: They were consistently risk-averse despite begging our team to take risks. But other values were real--my team certainly tried to follow them, and apart from the risk-taking, I didn't feel we were ever crushed or discouraged.

LAYOFFS: Did leave dead wood on the tree while cutting really good people. True of my current company, too.

R&R (FOCAL): People who didn't like it generally wanted to get a big fat raise for just showing up. There are jobs where that happens--feel free to work at one of them. My first FOCAL was horrible. But they always published the characteristics of the people in the top tier for your grade, and the accomplishments of people who got promotions. You could also study the characteristics/accomplishments of the grade above yours. It's practically a recipe for success. And guess what? It works everywhere, not just at Intel (although most places don't publish them, so you have to pay attention). It's not a perfect system, but neither are the others I've experienced.

Intel taught me to manage my career and build skills--I learned a lot. I loved the teams I worked in, and had fun. I would go back if I didn't have to take a pay cut. Not for everyone, though...

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pv44 in Syracuse, New York

68 months ago

Are the majority of people here commenting on Intel's corporate culture or the atmosphere for their fabs/ research and development divisions (or--gasp--possibly both?!!)? As a student in microelectronic engineering, it would be helpful to know what I may run into in the future.

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james7 in Beaverton, Oregon

59 months ago

I worked at intel for about 5 years. I loved it for most of that time, but it was mostly out of ignorance. I made "enough" i didn't check their compensation numbers against market pay rates. I didn't think anything of mass layoffs every year, mass markdowns in focal/ranking/rating. Until I got told "we can't give you a good rating this year. You got a good rating four years in a row. IR for you this year." (IR=Improvement Required. basically they make the middle management schmucks rate people badly even if they achieved their objectives, and got good 360 feedback. The 360 feedback was sometimes backstabbing, but i made it a habbit of never saying anything bad and making sure that people saw what i wrote so they knew they could trust me. Intel was a good place to work if you aren't aware of your surroundings. If you don't look out in the market for a better job. If you are into corporate brain washing and what not --- see your quarterly bum meeting. Think about the difference between "news" and "commentary" and "propaganda" its a natural combination of them delivered with a twist. I left intel when i was making 73000, my first job out of intel paid 97,000 - three years out i'm at 115,000 and work with people i can trust, work with a management team who can communicate and work effectively. Don't think that Intel is the best company to work for -- sure it may be stable -- but its stress pit.

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Pablo in Mesa, Arizona

51 months ago

Well, I feel a little like a loser, but I want to add my two cents since I saw so many people over the years build their entire lives around Intel, only to be chewed up and spit out by this hateful company. I never realized I would be one myself, after surviving 23 years of that mess. The funny thing is, I fought tooth-and-nail to keep my $80K job there! Believe it or not, after 23 years, I thought I was doing great money-wise. In fact over time, the Intel propaganda machine convinces you that just by having a job there, you are a "cut above" everything and everyone. Now I can see that my peers that either stuck to a job with a good, employee-oriented company, or worked for a series of companies until they found a good fit are in much better positions than myself (living off of my retirement at the moment).
Intel itself isn't evil, of course, but it *has* allowed evil management practices to fester and grow into giant, puss-filled malignant tumors within their HR policies and management structure.At the core of this putrid mess is the Intel performance review process. The good managers hate going through this process, which typically stretches into nearly 5 months of activity within a work-year. The terrible managers love this time at Intel and are giddy about all the pre-meetings they will be having with their employees so they can catch them up on the latest Mission statements that will clearly show them why the work they are doing might be good, but not necessarily tied in to the latest management objectives and therefore subject to criticism. That's right, any well-done job you might do at Intel could be torn apart and actually listed as a liability on your performance review!
Actually Intel "avails itself" many ways to give its employees bad performance reviews: (an "Improvement Required" rating comes with a 90-day "Corrective Action Plan" which must be completed to the satisfaction of the manager or you are out). Uh oh out of space. Pablo

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christiandrakenstein in Dublin, Ireland

41 months ago

salaries, bonuses, benefits ? it does not matter. this is your career coffin.
travel requirements ? if you like to travel on the cheap on all business related trips, even as a product line manager (travels a lot - and the only reason he does so is because someone said PLM have to travel a lot), go ahead.
if you want to risk basing your progress on a buddy system, go ahead.
if you want to look at your cv after 3 years time and get panic attacks, go ahead.
if you want to spend endless time in useless meetings and want to get on a Corrective Action Plan because you skip this nonsense once in a while, go ahead.
common sense has left this place. I can not understand how they can keep existing with having such an unefficient management system. It is frightening what they waste in money with making the most incompetent ppl run entire product lines and wasting other peoples money and careers. the only requirement to be in management seems to be : work at least 9 years at this place and have a BMI of at least 25 or drive the fattest car.
what I like best about working at Intel? that I am gonna hand in my resignation next week. I simply can not afford to work here anymore.

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Had a good run in Corvallis, Oregon

38 months ago

"You have no job security there: it's about who—not what—you know. At 50, watch out: you will be targeted for "job force reductions". Intel wants young and/or foreign workers:. CHEAP help."
This is how I was "letgo", after 12 years. Had a great year too: IRT member, strech leader, safty team member, Did a skit promation, Gave feedback about tool sets, manuals and training.

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over 50 in West Sacramento, California

11 days ago

RCG in Irvine, California said: I will start the job next month and find out.

I am a 25 year employee of Intel and to be honest, this was the best job I ever had.
Was it easy? No
was it all joy No
did I work long hard hours? Yes

But I know others that just came in did their job and left... so it's what you make of it.
I got my best satisfaction helping solve peoples problems.

So what is different and what is the bad...Managers, they can make or break you.
They want you to move around change jobs but most of them have been in the same position since they came to Intel.

but that being what it is... I am still happy with my time here, yes I was told I am targeted to take the VSP and my review will be bad.(and first I heard of this was this week)
Again, this is all from me not living up to my manager's expectations or her manager's and I can live with that, hold my head high.
I did work with some great people and for no rhyme or reason, some of them were let go way before me...

I am looking forward to my time after Intel, and have no regrets for my time spent there.
I have worked at several other companies and this was a very good one, I did have a voice.

Peace out!

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