Hiring a 61 year-old

Get new comments by email
You can cancel email alerts at anytime.
Comments (9)

SereneOne in Hartford, Connecticut

23 months ago

I'm a graphic designer, and 61 years-old.

Someone passed my resume to one of JPMorgan Chase's ancillary divisions. The company has now asked me to come in for a job interview.

The Chase people have no idea how old I am. My resume has no "age-identifying" information, and shows only my employment history from the past 12 years.

My question:

Even if they LOVE my work, will "corporate policy" instantly kick me into the reject bin when they see that I'm not a 30-something, but 61 years-old?

I'd rather not waste time going on a pointless interview where someone of my "mature years" doesn't stand a chance in hell. I've gone on enough of those already.

Thanks.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

23 months ago

you really need to put 20 years of work history down

i'm in my forties and i put 12 years down sometimes only, and when i come walking in the look on their face is not good

they thought i'd be 35

then they ask, "so what year did you graduate college."

i don't know, go and tell us what happens. age discrimination is big. starts at 40.

dye your hair, be energetic at the interview, don't wear outdated clothes and good luck.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

23 months ago

i love it when these morons say, my brother went to the college you went to, what year did you graduate?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

23 months ago

I just reread your original post. You state that someone passed along your resume. I overlooked that.

If this person has allot of pull at Morgan than age might not matter in your situation.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

SereneOne in Hartford, Connecticut

23 months ago

[Joe wrote: "dye your hair, be energetic at the interview, don't wear outdated clothes and good luck."]

No one would ever label me a geezer.

Unfortunately, that hasn't stopped most big companies who've employed me -- earlier in my career -- from kicking every employee to the curb by the time they hit 45, and never hiring anyone over 40.

Recently, a huge media corporation (who had seen my work and reportedly loved it), invited me for an interview. When I arrived, everyone in sight was 30 at most, and the department head no older than 35. Nevertheless, I left with the sense that the job was mine.

Weeks later, however, I received a strangely awkward phone call -- from the media company's National HR Director no less -- where she apologized profusely for the delay, and wanted to "update" me about the job, only to tell me that they'd decided to "hire internally."

Not long after, I spoke to several people who had once worked for the aforementioned major media company. Each told me that the media company's unwritten HR/Legal policy was to never hire anyone over 45, regardless of talent or merit. The hiring wishes of department heads counted for nothing when it came to age. The HR Department set the ultimate rules. So essentially, I'd wasted my time from the start.

Since JPMorgan Chase is more conventionally corporate than the aforementioned media company, I suspect they're even more likely to have an "unwritten" hiring rule in place.

Unless, of course, I'm wrong.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

mmorse in Trabuco Canyon, California

23 months ago

I could have written this. I too am a 61 year old graphic designer living in CA. I've gone through the same frustrating and ultimately useless interviews. In fact, I've yet to interview with someone my age or close to my age. Nobody would label me a geezer either. I work out religiously and nobody thinks I'm 61 but I don't look 30 either. It's been 20 months now since my last job was "outsourced". These people see my resume and my online portfolio prior to asking me to come in for an interview so it can't be the work or skillset. I don't care how young and energetic I try to be, you can see the look on their face as soon as we make eye contact. SereneOne, I think we are being hit by a double age whammy. Not only our age but the profession we chose is considered a young man/woman profession. At this point, I'm seriously considering giving up on the graphic designer thing and do something else until retirement.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

lawnarjax in Jacksonville, Florida

22 months ago

I am a current manager at Chase and I have hired from all ends of the age spectrum, there is no filter for that in our hiring and screening process. Personally i tend to hire more mature people because of the sensitivity of the function I manage. All in all I would say that Chase favors the seasoned workforce as their experience and professionalism exceeds that of the "gimme" generation that seems to think that just because they have a BS they are worth 100k a year. Be energetic, dress nicely, you will do fine.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

22 months ago

lawnarjax in Jacksonville, Florida said: I am a current manager at Chase and I have hired from all ends of the age spectrum, there is no filter for that in our hiring and screening process. Personally i tend to hire more mature people because of the sensitivity of the function I manage. All in all I would say that Chase favors the seasoned workforce as their experience and professionalism exceeds that of the "gimme" generation that seems to think that just because they have a BS they are worth 100k a year. Be energetic, dress nicely, you will do fine.

You are the exception. And, I bet your at least 50 years of age.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

lawnarjax in Jacksonville, Florida

22 months ago

35, but nice guess. And honestly I would say that the majority of the people at the bank in important roles are in the 40-60 age range. I'm not talking entry level jobs here, I am talking about professionals with 10+ years of experience. These are not bank tellers or people on the phones, where I suspect you will find a much younger crowd.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

» Sign in or create an account to comment on this topic.