Stuck at 25 with a college degree and no career

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Morpheos in Storrs Mansfield, Connecticut

26 months ago

Morpheos in Storrs Mansfield, Connecticut said:

Thus I have gone full circle in 2.5 years and am back where I started. This temporary job I now have is expected to end in several months so no job security. I hate it any way. I am at the same manufacturing job I did in 2010. I have not developed any work experience or skills that are transferable outside of manufacturing or even to skilled manufacturing. I feel like I have thrown away my college degree by working low skill job and a I desperately want to get out of low skill manufacturing but don't know how. I am not cut out for sales or telephone jobs and am a very introverted person but I am very smart. I am very frustrated at being stuck for so long. I see my work history as terrible. No one is going to hire me for a position of greater responsibility or skill as they can find candidates who already have highly specific applicable experience or kids fresh from college who don't look like damaged goods. Maybe education is a way out of this underemployment trap but I do not have the job security or income to pay for school and other living expenses and taking out loans or going to school full time (which would be the most effective way) seems irresponsible and risky. I feel like if I had majored in an applied technical field like engineering or accounting or some medical technical field, etc, I would have had the skill set to get an entry level job even in the recession but going back to school now seems risky even though I am fortunate enough to be currently debt free. The soft skills of an Economics/History/Psychology/etc degree do not seem to be worth much in this highly specialized, highly competitive labor buyers' market. I am very interested in hearing feedback from other forum readers about my situation and how it relates to their own experiences. I would be interested in hearing how others became unstuck.

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Bean counter in San Jose, California

26 months ago

Have you ever tried applying for any entry level bank teller type of position? How about clerical level government jobs?

My suggestions:
- start taking transferable accounting classes (for a BS degree) in your community college asap; do it in the evening so you can work during the day;
- erase all your manufacturing experience from your resume
- "create" 2 years' experience such as working for your parents' family business -- that you handle various tasks including bookkeeping, interface with potential clients, inventory tracking etc., use a title like 'business associate' or 'accounting assistant' to suit an accounting clerk job opening.

There's no way to "unstuck" in your situation even in a normal economy. When you new resume's done, try to register with as many agencies as you can, but not those recruiting for manufacturing jobs for sure. And continue, of course, to apply online for any jobs that can utilize your degree to some extent at least... It's very sad that you end up in those manufacturing jobs, the ones worked in my previous companies are mostly non-degreed minority with limited English skills.

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phriot in Medford, Massachusetts

26 months ago

I don't know how competitive applying for the positions is, but if you want to stick with Economics, have you tried looking for jobs with the federal government? (www.usajobs.gov). I just did a quick search (advanced search, selecting "Economist" and "Economics Assistant," which returned 27 positions, and for quite a few, the main requirement was having a Bachelor's in Economics and a 3.0 or higher GPA. (I don't think any of them were in Connecticut, but at least one was in NYC, so a commute for an interview wouldn't be too terrible if you were to receive one.)

If you want to move to something like Accounting, I think a good place to start would be to either take a couple of night classes as Bean Counter suggested, but even some self-teaching would be appropriate - just to make sure the field is something you could see yourself doing though, I wouldn't suggest going back for a second Bachelor's. If you find you do like accounting, I've found that some colleges offer Master's Degrees in Accounting that only require that you've finished a Bachelor's, but don't specify that it had to be in Accounting. (I think this is a better option, as a Master's should take just as long as a BA/BS for you, and you won't get financial aid for a second Bachelor's anyways.) Alternatively, just find the lowest-level position you can find doing anything at a financial institution or bank and try to work your way into a field you like and then try to move up the ladder.

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Nick in Somerville, Massachusetts

26 months ago

usajobs.gov has done nothing but jerk me around. It may be different for accounting or "specialized skills." I'm about 0 for 15 on applications for jobs the site told me I qualify for, only to be rejected in the first round. Including twice where I went into a federal building for testing, thought I did darn well on the test, and didn't get called back anyway.

Vets get preference (as they should) for these jobs, and there are a lot of vets coming back looking for work.

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Average in Medford, Massachusetts

26 months ago

The job market, especially the business/finance/professional services sectors are very unforgiving. I'm in a similar situation, and I can only say that your profile is exactly the kind of person many employers don't want to hire because to them, it doesn't seem like you have the right attitude( because you're not extroverted) and know what you're doing. You may think you're intelligent, there's no proof of it. It's applied intelligence that counts--if you can't apply it to a job or internship, it doesn't exist.

The job market is so competitive that those who get ahead are those with the right personality and the right internships, the right grades, and the right schools. Many job ads are beginning to resemble personals ads because people spend more time at work than with their families and friends.

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Average in Medford, Massachusetts

26 months ago

The job market, especially the business/finance/professional services sectors are very unforgiving. I'm in a similar situation, and I can only say that your profile is exactly the kind of person many employers don't want to hire because to them, it doesn't seem like you have the right attitude( because you're not extroverted) and know what you're doing. You may think you're intelligent, there's no proof of it. It's applied intelligence that counts--if you can't apply it to a job or internship, it doesn't exist.

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Average in Medford, Massachusetts

26 months ago

The job market is so competitive that those who get ahead are those with the right personality and the right internships, the right grades, and the right schools. Many job ads are beginning to resemble personals ads because people are spending more time at work than with their families and friends. You may have to do some extensive acting to get pass the interview and "move up".

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Bean counter in San Jose, California

26 months ago

"You may have to do some extensive acting to get pass the interview and "move up"." It is so true in the real world, you just cannot 'be yourself' if you don't fit the type most of the hiring managers have in mind. In interviews, likeability is a significant factor in getting hired.

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Bluetea in Texas

26 months ago

Bean counter in San Jose, California said: "You may have to do some extensive acting to get pass the interview and "move up"." It is so true in the real world, you just cannot 'be yourself' if you don't fit the type most of the hiring managers have in mind. In interviews, likeability is a significant factor in getting hired.

I agree with this. The "just be yourself" approach in most cases, will not work. The interview today is more like a sales presentation. You have to "sell 'em".

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Bluetea in Texas

26 months ago

Nick in Somerville, Massachusetts said: usajobs.gov has done nothing but jerk me around. It may be different for accounting or "specialized skills." I'm about 0 for 15 on applications for jobs the site told me I qualify for, only to be rejected in the first round. Including twice where I went into a federal building for testing, thought I did darn well on the test, and didn't get called back anyway.

Vets get preference (as they should) for these jobs, and there are a lot of vets coming back looking for work.

I heard on the radio that usajobs.gov has 70 million apps on file. Good Luck! Ha!

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

26 months ago

Nick in Somerville, Massachusetts said: usajobs.gov has done nothing but jerk me around. It may be different for accounting or "specialized skills." I'm about 0 for 15 on applications for jobs the site told me I qualify for, only to be rejected in the first round. Including twice where I went into a federal building for testing, thought I did darn well on the test, and didn't get called back anyway.

Vets get preference (as they should) for these jobs, and there are a lot of vets coming back looking for work.

I don't even bother with gov jobs any longer

I've never heard back neither

First it takes too long to fill out the apps

In the dept of labor about 3 of the new labor reps got the job cause they know the supervisor there

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Officeworker in Corvallis, Oregon

23 months ago

Morpehos, cut yourself some slack. At 25, you are far from "finished." Why, you've barely started! This is the PERFECT age to get the bugs out. I'm 51, but when I was in my 20s, I had so many different jobs it wasn't even funny. No, they were high paid jobs. Some where straight up crappy but no one comes out the starting gates and becomes a CEO. This is the time when one pays their dues, makes their mistakes, has that one job you hate so much that you say take this job and shove it with no reprecussions. All those 'wonderkinder' you read about in the business porn~er~Fortune and Forbes magazine? Well, they're the exception not the rule...and sometime "hot stars" in their 20s can burn out to become nothing special in their 30s. Don't worry about having a fancy title and tons of money right now. Use these years as a learning experience. The money and title will come. Just don't give up and develop a negative attitude.

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Officeworker in Corvallis, Oregon

23 months ago

Also, have you considered things like Peace Corps, Americorps or Teach for America? You go into either low income urban areas or very rural areas or other 'disadvantaged' areas to teach school. You can get student loan forgiveness doing that. They pay a stipend and it looks good on a resume.

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Invisabot in Ossining, New York

23 months ago

Hey Morpheos I'm stuck at 25 as well and it sucks balls!I had a film degree and I knew it would suck I just didn't know how totally poorly my school prepared me. They gave me little actual hands on experience just a lot of reading, so when I got out I knew I would have to be doing a lot of free stuff. For the first couple of months I got temp jobs in offices and saved enough money so that I could take an internship. I managed to get two internship in post-production and the second was good because it actually gave me paid work. But because of my total suck-level of technical skill I could only do really tedious beginner stuff, and then finally their job ended and they bid me a farewell. I give it up to them for giving me the chance despite my lack of experience, but getting out I realized I was at the very beginning all over again! I didn't want have the skills to compete with the other kiddies in NYC who were making their own films already. So 2 years out of school, I ironically had to go to my community college and begin taking digital art classes that anyone can take. Now here I am 3 years out of college, no full time job (just a part time movie theater gig) and attending community classes to get a little certificate! I am still living with my parents, so you're at least lucky to have been financially independent (I assume)which I have yet to do. I have ended in the reverse of what so many students do so in a way I feel as if I've gone backward a lot even if I am getting new skills.

I would just say those community classes are worth it if you know exactly what to take. Instead of a Bachelor's you're better option might be to get an associate in something, because a Masters is a sh*t load of money unless you go to a Public University again.

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Investor Guy in San Francisco, California

23 months ago

Fake it til you make it.

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Purple in Lake Forest, Illinois

23 months ago

I have a Master's in Engineering from the top school (U.S.) in the field. I have been in school for the last 21 years. I'm 24 years old. And I have no job. I've applied for over 1000 jobs and only got 1 interview. I feel like a failure.

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Bean counter in San Jose, California

23 months ago

Did you look everywhere? I mean looking for a job in your field including cities that you are not crazy about....

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Bean counter in San Jose, California

23 months ago

Have you also register with all the agencies out there?

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Bean counter in San Jose, California

23 months ago

I dislike dealing with agencies but one must explore all avenue in searching job opportunities.

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Average in Medford, Massachusetts

23 months ago

guest in San Jose, California said: If you are a fresh grad then go back to your college placement center for assistance.

Which consisted of clipped Craigslist ads and that was when the housing boom was pushing up employment.

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Bluetea in Texas

23 months ago

Average in Medford, Massachusetts said: Which consisted of clipped Craigslist ads and that was when the housing boom was pushing up employment.

Its better to be on your college alumi association. JFK was a C student all the way through Haaahvard. But when your last name and the name on the library is the same, its a moot point.

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billy_penguin in Savannah, Georgia

23 months ago

I know the feeling. I'm 27 and I have student loan debt without the college degree. I felt stuck at 23 and went through a quarter-life crisis since then. I have an interest in accounting but I wasn't able to finish my degree due to my personal finances. I'm an introvert like yourself and I've been working at a call center since 2009... how ironic.

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John in Tomball, Texas

21 months ago

I graduated with a degree in finance but I'm pursuing a career in IT. It's just not a good market for business graduates unless you can get someone to vouch for you.

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John in Tomball, Texas

21 months ago

guest in Oakland, California said: You should abandon IT.

Americans are prerejected from IT due to H1B infestation and offshoring.

I think there are openings in network security and also computer programming.

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Justin in Wakefield, Massachusetts

13 months ago

Purple in Lake Forest, Illinois said: I have a Master's in Engineering from the top school (U.S.) in the field. I have been in school for the last 21 years. I'm 24 years old. And I have no job. I've applied for over 1000 jobs and only got 1 interview. I feel like a failure.

You're not a failure. I have a masters degree from the 3# program in my field (Spanish - I am a teacher) and got turned down in the last two interviews I gave. I am 34 years old and married. My wife has two jobs and is interviewing for a professorship in the Boston area soon. I will keep applying for teaching jobs this summer. I just had a temporary contract for several months at a middle school and LOVED it. I did so well they told me "we would give you a job if we had one". They had no openings. There are rumors a 70 year old might retire and then a teacher at the middle school will move over to the high school, creating an opening. I told the Principal he could count on me to fill the role. I got a great performance review, so I know that I have an in to that school. I will keep the relationship up, continue managing the country club I am working at now to pay bills, and keep on applying. It's all you can do. Being a failure is giving up, so don't do that.

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Orillion in Lincolnton, North Carolina

13 months ago

What nobody else is going to tell you: There is a lot of self-preservation in American industry currently, and what little job market there is currently is using strong HR to filter out social awkwardness in entry processing, and in fields where you're interacting with clients, well, I don't have to tell you what they are looking for..

What you do: Are you not a graduate in economics? Do you not know what supply and demand are and how to build infrastructure? Start a business with almost no overhead, because even if you somehow network into a position you'll still be considered "high risk" and most likely not even make it past "HR Filters"

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Ryan C in Englewood, Florida

12 months ago

I feel you man... got a B.A. in International business Administration two years ago. I have applied for literally thousands of positions, call people a couple time a week, Email follow up on every app! So far, not a single anything at all. Bank tellers, personal bankers, every GS <6 government position posted and I've head absolutely nothing.

At least you have something! I currently work as a handy man with my dad - it sucks! I was so optimistic when I graduated, I felt like I could conquer the world! I felt like I would have a job within months!

How Am I suppose to cultivate any skills if I can't land any sort of job? I know college doesn't teach us much - but it proves we can learn! that's the whole point right? But I'm fairly certain our generation is just screwed... Sorry to say it but if you don't have a rich family, or someone to pay for you to spend years interning, you're not even going to land even the most basic of jobs.

On another note:
Social revolutions are historically a consequence of an educated population with little social mobility. So maybe, our generation, the generation opportunity forgot, will lead to a major change in the social/political climate.

You can't give up! keep at it! every dog has his day, maybe you haven't got your day yet but it'll come. You cant give up, don't roll over and quite! What will that do? what will it help to give up?

I feel your pain really I do, I'm borderline suicidal!
I hope you get something soon.

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Todd in Royal Oak, Michigan

11 months ago

Lana, thanks for the info and links.

I have an issue with all these entrepreneurs. It's pretty obvious that the reason you have so many people trying to start their own companies is because most existing companies aren't hiring.

IMHO the current gen of 20-25 year olds live in a fantasy world where they think they can become poker stars or internet geniuses.

It's totally false hope. I'm a gen X, and it was reinforced in my early childhood that most businesses fail. There was a saying 4 out of 5 businesses fail in the first year, and 4 of the 5 remaining fail in 5 years.

Why do people think you can start a company NOW? Does it even make sense? No one will hire you because we're in a depression...and you think sinking capital into a new business is a good alternative?

But by all means, get all the free education you can, that's a great suggestion.

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LanaNL in Amsterdam, Netherlands

11 months ago

Hi Todd,

1) The free education is important for everyone because it is the latest school of thinking/trends. Things are changing and you should know what/why/how.

2) Every time I visit a website, I click on their "careers" section. And surprisingly, everyone seems to be hiring. There is a whole disruption going on with online job seeking since people can now apply with one click, so HR are going through some serious weeding processes such as "topgrading", and filtering through specific key terms. And in America, small businesses hire over 50% of private sector jobs. And during recession time, small businesses boom as big companies cut back. So entrepreneurship is important that it allows for a scaleable workforce which can quickly shift to where it is needed.

3) Look behind your back to generation Y which are termed "digital natives", who are learning to code and intuitive user interface ages 5-7 already! There is an emergence of generation Y who want to make it while they are still in their teens! So let's not even talk about generation X who didn't even learn to code until college curriculum :(

4) And even more bad news. I'm from the US, but moved to Amsterdam over a year ago. I've learned that European austerity measures->job cutbacks -> labor migration. AND getting a masters degree here for residents cost about $2000/yr and no rigorous application process (most masters only take 1 year). So when college grades feel insecure in the labor market, guess what, they stay on for another party, carefree year to get their masters. When I tried to apply for jobs, I saw that my skill level paid 30% less than in the US. Conversely, to apply for a job with the same pay level, employers wanted 2X more experience and a masters! And they also generally expected fluent English and Dutch. The writing on the wall says that European instability will drive mass migration of starving, overeducated Europeans who have masters and speak multiple languages (inc English).

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LanaNL in Amsterdam, Netherlands

11 months ago

6) The reason that there is such a high failure rate is that it is an indicator of a healthy economy. 5 coffee shops are welcome to open on one block. How much coffee would you have to drink for all of them to survive? The most innovative, that delivers meaningful value efficiently will survive. Does that means all the others crawl back to their caves and shrivel? No. They learn from their process and go on to start another business. Or they innovate and turn their coffee shop into a tea/soup/taco/cupcake/copy shop. But whether you fail or succeed at your first startup, you were employed, and were hopefully employing others during the time you were trying to make your business successful.

7) A lot of job employers would prefer that you tried something and failed and blogged about it rather than you not having tried. And there's tons of government and private funding to help you on your way. This is one thing that America has above and beyond Europe or Asia.

I hope you guys find this helpful and maybe inspiration. I'm not saying to back to school or apply for more jobs, but think outside of your sphere of comfort and take a risk. This is what makes America so great. OMG, I meet a lot of Europeans (even employed ones) whose dream it is to try out opportunities in America.

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Todd in Royal Oak, Michigan

11 months ago

LanaNL in Amsterdam, Netherlands said: The reason that there is such a high failure rate is that it is an indicator of a healthy economy.

The quote I gave has been a general rule of thumb. MOST businesses fail. Most fail within a year, the rest usually fail within 5 years.

It's not an issue with the economy, this is a typical rule of thumb.

Most business startups are failures. You may as well be putting your money into the lottery than trying a startup. You may as well be wasting money on another college degree.

If you wanted to start a coffee shop, odds are you'd have a Starbucks nearby. That's the reality, giant corporations make it difficult for an average person to succeed.

Look at the jobs being created in the US, retail, low-wage, part-time, temporary jobs. Just go work at McDonalds instead of going to college, why go in debt $100,000 to avoid facing the inevitable?

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LanaNL in Amsterdam, Netherlands

11 months ago

I meant the low success rate of startups as a sign of a healthy economy in the sense that it is not artificially upheld. The market demand determines the survival. If a company has a bad product, bad service, and is inefficient, it should not succeed or survive. Sometimes they do, like bad diners at busy NYC intersections. But that is a disservice to society when bad businesses succeed. This doesn't just apply to small businesses. Kodak went out of business even though they invented digital cameras. Blockbuster bellied up even though they offered online streaming, Netflix survived. Borders failed, Barnes and Noble survived.

Failing businesses is not a waste of time. You learn. The business fails, you lose your job, but you survive and go on. If you had work experience from AOL, Netscape, would you consider that a waste of time?

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Beth in Plano in Plano, Texas

11 months ago

If you loose your life savings in a failed business, of course it will hurt you for decades.

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Average in Winnersville, Massachusetts

11 months ago

Todd in Royal Oak, Michigan said:
Why do people think you can start a company NOW? Does it even make sense? No one will hire you because we're in a depression...and you think sinking capital into a new business is a good alternative?

But by all means, get all the free education you can, that's a great suggestion.

I don't know. I've heard that one of the reasons that Asian Americans have such a low unemployment rate is because there is a high level of self-employment among them. I think they are able to start small businesses and keep the going because Asian American communities

1. Provide practical products and services. There are few of them offering trendy products and services like mobile apps in the U.S.
2. May support their small businesses at the expense of providing traffic to other businesses. I am not sure.

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LanaNL in Amsterdam, Netherlands

11 months ago

You have to be a highly motivated individual to start your own business.
But I will venture to say that if you are actively reading through these forums, then you are motivated to change your status quo right now.

So I would suggest go to networking events in the area of your interest either through local chamber of commerce, or through www.meetup.com
Talk to people, find a mentor, find someone in your similar situation. Then see if starting a business is right for you. You have to be realistic and scale up when you think about starting a business. It would not make sense to sink your "life's savings" at this stage. But all this will unfold as you research into it yourself. The most important thing is to become versatile in the market place. Especially if you are young since you still have a long ways to go.
Let's go back in history and recall the great depression in 1929. Individual farmsteads were no longer viable for the masses. What would a young farmer do if he had no manufacturing skills, no farm, and no money? There was the gold rush, and many young farmers became miners. Let's agree that mining was highly speculative. Some people systematically eked out a living, some people were consistently successful because they were strategic and smart, some people had bad luck and never made it. But many people who came to mine gold, failed, and continued in another business. They filled in gaps in services and products. They sold supplies, loaned money, sold bread, etc.

Fast forward to the 21st century. If you are unhappy and barely surviving at the farm, then go where the gold is. Go where the opportunity is. Find your place there. You have nothing to lose at 25. *There were many unsuccessful gold miners who went back to the farm.

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Average in Winnersville, Massachusetts

11 months ago

LanaNL in Amsterdam, Netherlands said:
Failing businesses is not a waste of time. You learn. The business fails, you lose your job, but you survive and go on. If you had work experience from AOL, Netscape, would you consider that a waste of time?

Most people visiting this page don't have the knowledge to start an i.t. start-up or if they have the knowledge, don't have a unique product to sell. Being an entrepreneur requires and cash flow that is separate from the business. Being an entrepreneur requires a lot of charity from others until you start to make a profit. Many entrepreneurs that started high tech companies came from affluent families or ALREADY HAD a decent job. This allowed them to keep trying, whereas a poorer person or a person with no marketable skills would have to take a day job. I don't know where you heard about all this government and private funding for small businesses--no one, other than family and friends and outside the student loan business, is loaning money without serious consideration as to whether they will get their money back in the U.S. Finally, most people who start their own business and succeed have a certain personality traits. One trait they seem to have is that they are very good at persuading people.

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LanaNL in Amsterdam, Netherlands

11 months ago

I'm definitely not suggesting everyone go out and start a hi-tech business. My example was to illustrate that you could have worked for Kodak and Blockbuster which failed, but that doesn't mean that having worked for a failed business was a waste of your time.

However, most successful business models nowaday have to have a tech element to them to reach new customers and to maintain relationships with customers. And new businesses are always a better selling and maybe of a better product. You don't always need a unique product. Look at the selection of chewing gum next time you are at the store.

And yes, the government and private/corporate sector have many programs in the works where they fund startups, usually around some initiative such as cleaner energy, education reform, etc. The American government has always had public works in place to stimulate the economy by paying people to work. Only instead of building bridges that go nowhere, they are now funding startups that have vision and passion behind them. New legislation that has passed to lower the barrier to entrepreneurship is allowing for "crowdfunding" where ANYONE can talk about their idea, and how much money they want to raise to make things happen. And individuals can collectively donate anywhere from $1 for a thank you sticker, to hundreds for the product, or thousands, etc for a return.
One example is www.kickstarter.com, which is a fundraising platform for creative projects.
I know that local city governments (at least in big cities) have incubators where they provide mentorship, office support, and office space for little or no cost to startups, and financial grants. This is also being done by private venture companies as well.

But anyways, you are right that large scale hi-tech startups are not for everyone. But I think that free-lancers will take over a large part of the work force. People will work on projects, rather than 9-5. You ARE your unique selling point.

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Bluetea in Texas

11 months ago

LanaNL in Amsterdam, Netherlands said: I'm definitely not suggesting everyone go out and start a hi-tech business. My example was to illustrate that you could have worked for Kodak and Blockbuster which failed, but that doesn't mean that having worked for a failed business was a waste of your time.

Kodak and Blockbuster didn't fail so much as they reached the end of their product life cycle - which in tech years' is extremely short today. In other words, for tech products, you have a very narrow window in which to recoup your initial expenditures before you end up in the microchip graveyard.

Take a snapshot of the Dow Jones Industrials, the 30 largest companies in the world and then take another snapshot, ten years from now. Half them will be gone.

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LanaNL in Amsterdam, Netherlands

11 months ago

It is true that "disruption" in tech years is incredibly fast. But Kodak and Blockbuster did not reach the end of their product life cycle. That would imply that people do not take photos anymore, or that no one is watching movies. Ironically, Kodak developed the digital camera technology that is still being used today, by every other manufacture. And Netflix (offers dvd/game rentals, streaming movies/tv shows-like Blockbuster) plus Youtube account for HALF of internet traffic in North America.
There were many reasons why Kodak and Blockbuster failed. But it was not due to the end of any particular product life cycle. It was because they were not innovative enough to catch up to and outpace disruption in their sector.
Really adaptive brands will listen and develop for their users, even abandoning a their business model for a new one, merge, otherwise they fail. Lack of innovation and responsiveness is behind the lack of corporate longevity.
But hey, I'm glad they are bringing back Twinkies and I wish one of you nice folks would send some to me in the Netherlands :)
And sincere apologies to Morpheos for hijacking your post. But as long as you care and you are hungry, you will find your way. Get a mentor, ask for some objective advice. It could be as simple as resume changes, cover letters, etc.

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Bluetea in Texas

11 months ago

LanaNL in Amsterdam, Netherlands said: It is true that "disruption" in tech years is incredibly fast. But Kodak and Blockbuster did not reach the end of their product life cycle. That would imply that people do not take photos anymore, or that no one is watching movies. Ironically, Kodak developed the digital camera technology that is still being used today, by every other manufacture. And Netflix (offers dvd/game rentals, streaming movies/tv shows-like Blockbuster) plus Youtube account for HALF of internet traffic in North America.
There were many reasons why Kodak and Blockbuster failed. But it was not due to the end of any particular product life cycle. It was because they were not innovative enough to catch up to and outpace disruption in their sector.
Really adaptive brands will listen and develop for their users, even abandoning a their business model for a new one, merge, otherwise they fail. Lack of innovation and responsiveness is behind the lack of corporate longevity.
But hey, I'm glad they are bringing back Twinkies and I wish one of you nice folks would send some to me in the Netherlands :)
And sincere apologies to Morpheos for hijacking your post. But as long as you care and you are hungry, you will find your way. Get a mentor, ask for some objective advice. It could be as simple as resume changes, cover letters, etc.

One of my college professors said it best. He said "Change and innovation does not come from established institutions (yes, there are always exception). They are too slow and too bound up in bureaucracy. Change comes from the bearded, itinerant malcontent who even now is toiling away in his/her garage.

The rest of you are in my class". LOL!

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Bluetea in Texas

11 months ago

LanaNL in Amsterdam, Netherlands said: That would imply that people do not take photos anymore, or that no one is watching movies.

Useful life cycle ends when it is no longer prudent to make a product or service which doesn't sell.

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Average in Winnersville, Massachusetts

11 months ago

LanaNL in Amsterdam, Netherlands said: the government has many programs in the works where they fund startups, usually around some initiative such as cleaner energy, education reform, etc.

What you keep skating around is the fact someone needs
knowledge and marketable skills
to take advantage of government financing programs for clean energy, educational reform, etc. in addition to personal drive Of course, the government is offering money to people who can demonstrate some potential ability to tackle difficult problems--those people are rare.
LanaNL in Amsterdam, Netherlands said: New legislation that has passed to lower the barrier to entrepreneurship is allowing for "crowdfunding" where ANYONE can talk about their idea, and how much money they want to raise to make things happen. And individuals can collectively donate anywhere from $1 for a thank you sticker, to hundreds for the product, or thousands, etc for a return. kickstarter, which is a fundraising platform for creative projects.

Kickstarter works if you have a high level of talent and selling-ability. Kickstarter doesn't change the fact that it is hard to make a living doing something creative.

LanaNL in Amsterdam, Netherlands said: I think that free-lancers will take over a large part of the work force.
A large part of the workforce will be unemployed then. Freelancers reflect shrinking demand for workers, not growing demand.

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Bluetea in Texas

11 months ago

Average in Winnersville, Massachusetts said: A large part of the workforce will be unemployed then. Freelancers reflect shrinking demand for workers, not growing demand.

Martin Ford in his "Lights in the Tunnel" says that in the future, not only will there be less demand for workers but for people in general.

From a marketing perspective, next year we go "flat" on the birthrate. What this means is that there will be a growing demand for dentures and less demand for sippy cups for the foreseeable future.

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

11 months ago

Average in Winnersville, Massachusetts said:

A large part of the workforce will be unemployed then. Freelancers reflect shrinking demand for workers, not growing demand.

Realistically, what are 1 or 2 things that would stop the US from a future "shrinking" workforce?

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GThg3zx in Wayne, Pennsylvania

7 months ago

Hey ya'll! I have my BS degree in criminal justice and my life sucks more now than years ago! Obviously everyone enjoys the college years but I haven't been able to find the right job with decent pay for a while now... Anyone have any ideas?!? Like most of us, I want to make big money and willing to travel the world for it... Ideas?!? Thanks!....

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Need New Job in Chicago, Illinois

7 months ago

GThg3zx in Wayne, Pennsylvania said: Hey ya'll! I have my BS degree in criminal justice and my life sucks more now than years ago! Obviously everyone enjoys the college years but I haven't been able to find the right job with decent pay for a while now... Anyone have any ideas?!? Like most of us, I want to make big money and willing to travel the world for it... Ideas?!? Thanks!....

Time to stop dreaming. Big money and seeing the world isn't in the cards right now. Most people accept steady employment that pays enough to cover your expenses with a little left over for fun. Hopefully that employment is stimulating in some way too.

What do you want to do? Making money isn't what you want to do - that's the result of what you want to do. Figure out a profession that you don't mind doing to fill the hours and the money takes care of itself.

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J in Cleveland, Ohio

7 months ago

Stay encouraged everyone. I am obtaining my BA in Organizational Management , but I am currently a Home health Aide. I consider every company who does not hire me is losing out on a great mind. I have over four years of manufacturing and fast-food restaurant management experience. I also have over six years of successful lean manufacturing and training experience. Sometimes its a waiting game believe me I know; I'm 30 with a wife and two daughters under two yrs old. I am just determined to succeed and that has resulted in creating my own businesses. Whatever you want to do have a passion for it and let it shine through during your interview.

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Beth in Plano in Plano, Texas

7 months ago

J,

You seem like a bright guy, I'm sure you will find a company that appreciates your talents.

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Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania

7 months ago

J in Cleveland, Ohio said: Stay encouraged everyone. I am obtaining my BA in Organizational Management , but I am currently a Home health Aide. I consider every company who does not hire me is losing out on a great mind. I have over four years of manufacturing and fast-food restaurant management experience. I also have over six years of successful lean manufacturing and training experience. Sometimes its a waiting game believe me I know; I'm 30 with a wife and two daughters under two yrs old. I am just determined to succeed and that has resulted in creating my own businesses. Whatever you want to do have a passion for it and let it shine through during your interview.

That's wonderful J and I am happy for you and everyone else that finally gets hired. But I can tell you that there is a HUGE difference in opportunity when you are 30 years old, male, and have a degree on the horizon. Try being female over the age of 50 without one. I even once owned a business, but I can't even get a nibble for a part time gig.

Good luck and I hope you never lose that optimism.

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Bluetea in Texas

7 months ago

Unhappilyunemployed in Pennsylvania said: Try being female over the age of 50 without one. I even once owned a business, but I can't even get a nibble for a part time gig.

Yeah, Hooters never called me back either.

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