More Useless Advice

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Jeff in Denver, Colorado

15 months ago

The magic formula for finding a job, according to linkedin:

"If you are thinking about a new job in the New Year, let me map out your first milestone. It involves getting clear about what you know and don’t know about job search. See if you can answer the following questions:

1) I know what problems I solve that companies will pay good money for.

2) I can share who I am and what I want to do in 3 sentences or less.

3) I know 10 companies in my area that need my brand of expertise.

4) I have a clear networking plan to connect with at least 5 people at each of these companies.

5) My resume and LinkedIn profile optimized, focused and error-proof.

6) My cover letter strategy is going to get them at “hello.”

7) I have completed interview prep and am up-to-speed on behavioral interviewing.

8) I understand how to leverage informational interviewing to uncover hidden job opportunities and to get referred into competitive positions."

Target 10 companies??? In today's economy??? ROFL!!!

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Nick in Linden, New Jersey

15 months ago

1: Every company has a "problem" I can solve.
2: Try three words: Nick the Cleaner
3: Every company needs my brand of "expertise."
4: I'll definitely "connect" with 5 or more people in the company.
5: Those who need my resume, get it. Those who don't, don't.
6: Hey, THEY came to ME for my "services."
7: Look, you either want this job done or not. I have a line.
8: Oh yeah, I understand "leverage" very well.

=D

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

15 months ago

"More Useless Advice"

Blows my little brain the amount of "useless advice" that so call experts, Dept of Labor counselors, books, websites, friends, and others give the unemployed.

I believe that recruiters who recruit for high level positions get it and give the best advice. AS WELL AS PEOPLE OUT THERE LOOKING FOR WORK also give damm good advice.

"If you really want a job you can find one." I'll never forget that day when the DOL lady said that to a job seeker one day who was sitting next to me.

At a mandatory DOL meeting the counselor told us how great Linkedln was. In this DOL office I looked up on Linkedln and only found 1 person had an account. And it wasn't him.

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

15 months ago

4 years from now no one will be bragging about Linkedln. It's a fad.

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Nick in Linden, New Jersey

15 months ago

Hopefully 4 years from now, sites like Indeed will actually have live-wire job opportunities that aren't 30 time reposts of the same thing that never gets filled, too.

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Beth in Plano in Plano, Texas

15 months ago

Its a fad just like Facebook.

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Jeff in Denver, Colorado

15 months ago

Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York said: 4 years from now no one will be bragging about Linkedln. It's a fad.

LinkedIn might work if everyone had an account and everyone used it. But 95 percent of the people I know fall into 1 of 2 categories:
1) they don't expect to be looking for a job in the near future so they see no point in having an account;
2) the signed up for an account because it was the thing to do, but they don't pay any attention to the account.

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Bluetea in Texas

15 months ago

Jeff in Denver, Colorado said: LinkedIn might work if everyone had an account and everyone used it. But 95 percent of the people I know fall into 1 of 2 categories:
1) they don't expect to be looking for a job in the near future so they see no point in having an account;
2) the signed up for an account because it was the thing to do, but they don't pay any attention to the account.

What we need are more jobs and fewer gimmicks. LinkedIn is the answer to a question that nobody asked.

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Bluetea in Texas

15 months ago

Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York said: "More Useless Advice"

Blows my little brain the amount of "useless advice" that so call experts, Dept of Labor counselors, books, websites, friends, and others give the unemployed.

I believe that recruiters who recruit for high level positions get it and give the best advice. AS WELL AS PEOPLE OUT THERE LOOKING FOR WORK also give damm good advice.

"If you really want a job you can find one." I'll never forget that day when the DOL lady said that to a job seeker one day who was sitting next to me.

At a mandatory DOL meeting the counselor told us how great Linkedln was. In this DOL office I looked up on Linkedln and only found 1 person had an account. And it wasn't him.

The DOL is way out of touch.

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Jeff in Denver, Colorado

15 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: What we need are more jobs and fewer gimmicks. LinkedIn is the answer to a question that nobody asked.

I never understood how it was supposed to have worked.

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Jeff in Denver, Colorado

15 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: The DOL is way out of touch.

The DOL, like so many others, hasn't acknowledged that there is a new normal. They are locked into the ear in which it was mainly construction workers and unskilled laborers who needed help, while those with college degrees had secure jobs for life. The reality that in the new economy many white-collar workers and skilled laborers will be unemployed hasn't reached them yet.

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Bluetea in Texas

15 months ago

Jeff in Denver, Colorado said: The DOL, like so many others, hasn't acknowledged that there is a new normal. They are locked into the ear in which it was mainly construction workers and unskilled laborers who needed help, while those with college degrees had secure jobs for life. The reality that in the new economy many white-collar workers and skilled laborers will be unemployed hasn't reached them yet.

They still talk about seasonal workers and non-farm payrolls. I use to actually fill out some of their compliance reports. Its all BS.

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Bluetea in Texas

15 months ago

Jeff in Denver, Colorado said: I never understood how it was supposed to have worked.

How many people do you personally know, who have been hired because they had a profile on LinkedIn?

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Jeff in Denver, Colorado

15 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: How many people do you personally know, who have been hired because they had a profile on LinkedIn?

I don't know anyone who has even gotten an interview through LinkedIn.

What is LinkedIn supposed to do? You put up a profile. And then what? There's probably millions of profiles. Is anyone going to go through a large number of profiles to look for people with specific skills? And they wouldn't even know whether the people they found would be interested in their position.

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Bluetea in Texas

15 months ago

Jeff in Denver, Colorado said: I don't know anyone who has even gotten an interview through LinkedIn.

What is LinkedIn supposed to do? You put up a profile. And then what? There's probably millions of profiles. Is anyone going to go through a large number of profiles to look for people with specific skills? And they wouldn't even know whether the people they found would be interested in their position.

Think about it from LinkedIns point of view. How does this thing make money and how do we differentiate it from FB, MySpace, Friendster, Twitter and a dozen others?

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

15 months ago

Jeff in Denver, Colorado said: The DOL, like so many others, hasn't acknowledged that there is a new normal. They are locked into the ear in which it was mainly construction workers and unskilled laborers who needed help, while those with college degrees had secure jobs for life. The reality that in the new economy many white-collar workers and skilled laborers will be unemployed hasn't reached them yet.

Wow. So true. Very well written and a powerful statement.

Now imagine if they were a private comp. They be out of biz since they didn't adapt to change and were bloated with way too many employees.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

15 months ago

LinkedIn is a great tool, but it's just a tool, not a solution, certainly not a quick one. It's going to be around for a long time, especially since it's so easy for recruiters to use, especially since it has the capability to keep candidate profiles updates, unlike standalone talent acquisition systems.

It works best if you maintain it, and have recommendations. I've gotten cold contacts for jobs several times through LinkedIn; I've even landed one through it (the job wasn't posted and didn't even have a written description).

I know who to use as references because they've already endorsed my work on LinkedIn. If for nothing else, that alone makes it worthwhile; I know what they're going to say because they've already said it publicly.

When I find a job lead, I look up the company and see how I'm connected to it. Sometimes I snag an interview that way, sometimes I find out dirt that keeps me from pursuing it. If I'm interviewing, I have info on the people I'm interviewing with. I think maybe 1:10 doesn't have a profile, or one I can see, since people can lock down their profile visibility (just because you don't find the profile doesn't mean it doesn't exist).

Here LinkedIn is used a lot, but we're a tech town. I have noticed that gov't employees are less likely to have a public profile, as are HR directors (versus recruiters who will connect with anyone).

Even people whom I know will not benefit themselves from LinkedIn are using it; a tenured professor I used to work for joined LinkedIn in last month. This is a guy at the pinnacle of his career; his job could not be more secure. But he can use it to help others, and stay connected.

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Bluetea in Texas

15 months ago

jenab in Austin, Texas said: LinkedIn is a great tool, but it's just a tool, not a solution, certainly not a quick one. It's going to be around for a long time, especially since it's so easy for recruiters to use, especially since it has the capability to keep candidate profiles updates, unlike standalone talent acquisition systems.

It works best if you maintain it, and have recommendations. I've gotten cold contacts for jobs several times through LinkedIn; I've even landed one through it (the job wasn't posted and didn't even have a written description).

I know who to use as references because they've already endorsed my work on LinkedIn. If for nothing else, that alone makes it worthwhile; I know what they're going to say because they've already said it publicly.

When I find a job lead, I look up the company and see how I'm connected to it. Sometimes I snag an interview that way, sometimes I find out dirt that keeps me from pursuing it. If I'm interviewing, I have info on the people I'm interviewing with. I think maybe 1:10 doesn't have a profile, or one I can see, since people can lock down their profile visibility (just because you don't find the profile doesn't mean it doesn't exist).

Here LinkedIn is used a lot, but we're a tech town. I have noticed that gov't employees are less likely to have a public profile, as are HR directors (versus recruiters who will connect with anyone).

Even people whom I know will not benefit themselves from LinkedIn are using it; a tenured professor I used to work for joined LinkedIn in last month. This is a guy at the pinnacle of his career; his job could not be more secure. But he can use it to help others, and stay connected.

So how does it make money?

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Stillsmiling in Kingsland, Georgia

15 months ago

Obviously I'm not using my linkedin account right. I've had one but have few contacts and not sure who I should try to add as contacts. Since I have so few contacts and only follow one or two companies, I don't use my linkedin account when applying for jobs. The problem is I really don't know enough people that would really benefit me by adding them. Not sure a this site would benefit me enough for the time it would take to create enough of those contacts and recommendations.

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

15 months ago

I haven't gotten contacted much (hardly ever) from any site that I put my resume on. In the past when I had my resume posted I received calls. And, this time around my resume is awesome too, back then I didn't have too much experience and meat on the resume but got calls.

Maybe I need to put some phony references on my Linkedln account. Yea.

"The 10 million dollar deal that Joe put together at the last minute between Trump and Turner just touches the surface as to what he can do when dealing with difficult personalities."

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jenab in Austin, Texas

15 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: So how does it make money?

Super-short answer is the advertising on the site, premium memberships, and the ones for recruiters, and the data analysis they can sell (not your private info).

The premium memberships are NOT worth paying for the vast majority of LinkedIn users.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

15 months ago

Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York said: Maybe I need to put some phony references on my Linkedln account. Yea.

"The 10 million dollar deal that Joe put together at the last minute between Trump and Turner just touches the surface as to what he can do when dealing with difficult personalities."

Which would require creating different accounts with emails you haven't associated with your existing account, and a whole lot of steps to get them posted. And recruiters do check the references; even if you created fake profiles, it's pretty easy to ferret out fake ones, and the mutual admiration fairies associations. :D

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

15 months ago

You know I almost forgot, last week when I login to Linkedln I got a message saying that millions of passwords were stolen.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

15 months ago

Stillsmiling in Kingsland, Georgia said: Obviously I'm not using my linkedin account right. I've had one but have few contacts and not sure who I should try to add as contacts. Since I have so few contacts and only follow one or two companies, I don't use my linkedin account when applying for jobs. The problem is I really don't know enough people that would really benefit me by adding them. Not sure a this site would benefit me enough for the time it would take to create enough of those contacts and recommendations.

Do you spend any time developing your professional network? People you've worked with in the past whom you'd like to stay in touch with or work with again?

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Stillsmiling in Kingsland, Georgia

15 months ago

jenab in Austin, Texas said: Do you spend any time developing your professional network? People you've worked with in the past whom you'd like to stay in touch with or work with again?

I stay in touch with a few but mostly I prefer not to as it is in a way different industry than I am interested in getting into. A lot of my coworkers were such backstabbers that I can't guarantee the reference would be best for my career ambitions. Have a few people in mind to try to connect with but many I know don't have linkedin accounts.

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endoftheworld in Glastonbury, Connecticut

15 months ago

Actually I do not think that advice is useless, if you actually did all that you'd likely greatly increase your odds for employment vs. doing nothing.
I'd find it hard to believe someone has done all that and has been out of work for more than 2 yrs.
I am not of the mind that Facebook and LinkedIn are fads, in fact i greatly fear registration/signing in to Facebook in order to just USE the internet will become compulsory in the near future, so many websites allready want you to sign in with a facebook account and I was under the impression that the majority of people esp. in the under 35 agegroup have an account.
I just pray I get a job this year so I can get the H outta here, now my next door neighbors have had their #ucking TV on since 5pm Fri. I have no clue what the H happened, they hardly ever used to watch TV but recently it's been on since 5pm on weeknights and all day on the weekend, it is so loud I can hear it with my kitchen fan on or when I have my TV on, grr.

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Investor Guy in San Francisco, California

15 months ago

Linked in and Facebook are not passing fads. These can be useful tools that can result in you getting a job. Yes many use Facebook for idiotic purposes well because many people are idiots, but having a 'web presence'can help you if you are very careful about the information you share. Linkedin in particular is useful and I even include a link to my profile in my cover letter. It adds weight to my claims by virtue of my references and endorsements on the site and my connections to past managers and employers. Also people like to see your picture even if it is illegal to ask for it. I let them see who I am via linkedin. As far as that advice some of it is no good but having an idea of why the comany is interviewing and exactly how you can fill the gap is good to keep at the forefront of your mind.

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Yep in Iowa City, Iowa

15 months ago

That advice might sound useful, but all it really does is make the job hunting process more complicated than it should be. Sometimes I think that HR people and career advice experts make this stuff up so that they can feel important, so people will seek them out for help. If job searching was more straight forward than no one would deal with them.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

15 months ago

Investor Guy in San Francisco, California said: Also people like to see your picture even if it is illegal to ask for it.
Don't volunteer your picture....ever. You may as well hand employers the keys to rejecting you if you do. Not only can they determine your race, age and sex if your first name is ambiguous, you may not photograph well or remind them of a person they dislike. Or you may photogenic but present a lesser appearance in person. From the employer's perspective, the employer does not know for sure if the person used another pic.

Someone here observed an employer may ask for a photo not for employment at all but to add to his/her "collection." Creepy. It's creepy enough applying to anonymous CL ads. In that regard, most law firm direct ads give only an e-mail address (though the firm's name can sometimes be sussed out from the domain name).

A book cannot be judged by its cover. Let them judge you first strictly by your quals. Make them work for it if they're hell-bent on seeing your picture.

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Jeff in Denver, Colorado

15 months ago

Yep in Iowa City, Iowa said: That advice might sound useful, but all it really does is make the job hunting process more complicated than it should be. Sometimes I think that HR people and career advice experts make this stuff up so that they can feel important, so people will seek them out for help. If job searching was more straight forward than no one would deal with them.

I don't know that the list was all that complicated. To re-phrase:
1) know what skills and talents you have.
2) know how to describe yourself concisely.
3) know what companies hire people with those skills and talents.
4) network.
5) proof-read your resume.
6) write a good cover letter.
7) practice interviewing.
8) do informational interviewing.

As far as I am concerned, the author took these mostly common-sense items and tried to make herself seem authoritative by doing things like assigning specific numbers to some of them. Target 10 companies? Not in today's job market. You're going to have to contact a lot more than 10 companies to find a job. Network with 5 people at each company? Good luck with that. If you can find a way to meet more than 2 people at a company, you're doing good. And no one does informational interviews any more. There are way too many job seekers for anyone to spend the time.

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Joe Gagill in Wurtsboro, New York

15 months ago

When I see some people's Linkedln accounts where they have other people's stellar references of them on their profile, maybe it's just my personality but I'm not impressed. In fact, in general, I look at it as being like the "snobby stuck up girl" in high school. I look at it like overly gross self promotion. It's a turn-off for me. Save the stellar references for the interview.

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Joe Gagill in Wurtsboro, New York

15 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: Its all self-promotion and BS.

.....and the over used catch phrases that references use over and over again just turn me off. Been seeing the word innovator used allot lately. How many Steve Jobs are really out there?

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jenab in Austin, Texas

15 months ago

Joe Gagill in Wurtsboro, New York said: When I see some people's Linkedln accounts where they have other people's stellar references of them on their profile, maybe it's just my personality but I'm not impressed. In fact, in general, I look at it as being like the "snobby stuck up girl" in high school. I look at it like overly gross self promotion. It's a turn-off for me. Save the stellar references for the interview.

Only you have to get to the interview first. The interview is more about fit than qualifications.

I agree there are some patently suspect recs on LinkedIn, but those are easy to spot. And definitely too many people who are all about promoting themselves versus using it as it was intended Unless someone is in sales or recruiting, I find anyone declaring themselves to be a LION (LinkedIn Open Networker-- they'll connect with anyone) to be suspect. Same goes for most w/500+ connections.

I started on LinkedIn specifically to recommend people I worked with, many of whom were not getting the recognition they deserved at work (The director would always share kudos, but the managers under her were very selective about which ones they shared). I've kept it going for years, but I'm not always active on it. I do keep my profile relatively current and I do connect with people I work with -- especially when I'm contracting.

But I'm very selective about whom I connect with; I don't connect with strangers and rarely connect with someone I don't have a strong and positive professional relationship with. And if I'm not actively searching, I limit my profile access to my connections.

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Joe Gagill in Wurtsboro, New York

15 months ago

jenab in Austin, Texas said: Only you have to get to the interview first. The interview is more about fit than qualifications.

I agree there are some patently suspect recs on LinkedIn, but those are easy to spot. And definitely too many people who are all about promoting themselves versus using it as it was intended Unless someone is in sales or recruiting, I find anyone declaring themselves to be a LION (LinkedIn Open Networker-- they'll connect with anyone) to be suspect. Same goes for most w/500+ connections.

I started on LinkedIn specifically to recommend people I worked with, many of whom were not getting the recognition they deserved at work (The director would always share kudos, but the managers under her were very selective about which ones they shared). I've kept it going for years, but I'm not always active on it. I do keep my profile relatively current and I do connect with people I work with -- especially when I'm contracting.

But I'm very selective about whom I connect with; I don't connect with strangers and rarely connect with someone I don't have a strong and positive professional relationship with. And if I'm not actively searching, I limit my profile access to my connections.

Funny, I actually was thinking about you when I wrote my comment. I even thought I would get a response back.

From reading your past writings here, I have come to the conclusion that there would be little embellishment in regards to everything in your Linkedln profile. Unlike many others.

And I think that is ONE reason I see Linkedln as a fad. Because eventually most honest people (or recruiters looking for candidates) will realize the overly false self promotion of many on Linkedln and will stop using it. By then, something else will be the new fad.

This took allot of brain cells for me to write.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

15 months ago

Joe Gagill in Wurtsboro, New York said: By the way I did not click the "no" tab on your post Jenab.

Even if you did, I wouldn't take it personally. :D I do appreciate that you said that, though.

I think we can agree to disagree. And I think too it helps if your particular field and your location make a difference.

Joe Gagill in Wurtsboro, New York said: And by the way I did not click the "no" tab on my post!

Welcome to the "auto-No" club. :D

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Jeff in Denver, Colorado

15 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: Yeah, doesn't anyone just mop the floors anymore.

Even the floor mopper can develop a modeler to optimize the number of swipes they need per room.

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Jeff in Denver, Colorado

15 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: Its all self-promotion and BS.

But isn't it self-promotion and BS that gets you a job?

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Jeff in Denver, Colorado

15 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: You would be like those Filipino girls who want to meet Joe. I find that creepy.

Creepy for Joe or for the Filipino girls?

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Calfornian in Hayward, California

15 months ago

Jeff in Denver, Colorado said: The magic formula for finding a job, according to linkedin:

5) My resume and LinkedIn profile optimized, focused and error-proof.

Why is advice always self-serving? It's like oil change places recommending you change your oil every 3,000 miles. "But the manual says every 7,500".

I honestly think the concept of linkedin is brilliant but the need to make money from it has defeated them. And the discussion groups are little more than self-promotions either to generate website hits or personal brand building. I'd like to discuss business but I got tired, really fast, of every article being, uh, self-serving.

Hey, I went in a circle.

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Bluetea in Texas

15 months ago

Jeff in Denver, Colorado said: But isn't it self-promotion and BS that gets you a job?

Well, yes, you have a point. LOL!

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Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

15 months ago

Joe Gagill in Wurtsboro, New York said: When I see some people's Linkedln accounts where they have other people's stellar references of them on their profile, maybe it's just my personality but I'm not impressed. In fact, in general, I look at it as being like the "snobby stuck up girl" in high school. I look at it like overly gross self promotion. It's a turn-off for me. Save the stellar references for the interview.

haha, are you serious?

It makes perfect sense to get recommendations from previous coworkers. Why wouldn't it? It immediately lets any HR/recruiter know that the role was legitimate and that someone there liked you enough to recommend you to the world and add weight to your role. As for it being self promotion....well yeah. That's a part of job hunting, it's promoting yourself and your services to potential employers who could use those services. I don't get any sense of 'snobby high school girl' from it at all. That's going a tad overboard.

If the person had really generic recommendations and a million of them then yes, I'd be inclined to agree. If they're thoughtful and useful then why the hell not.

LinkedIn has been great for me, I get recruiters reaching out to me and I find the information gained on companies and connections within to be very worthwhile. I can see who the HR people are in the companies, learn about their backgrounds before going in to an interview etc.

It's a tool, its not going to necessarily land you a job but if you use it correctly it can help tremendously. Considering the number of people using it nowadays it doesn't hurt one bit to have an account and to keep it up to date. I also make sure to join groups that are in line with my industry and have noticed members checking out my profile.

None of these things will harm you (unless you're really stupid about it), they can only help.

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

15 months ago

Linked-in, Stinked-in, I tried it and didn't like it. It's just another popularity contest like Facebook.

Twitter is another waste of time unless you enjoy talking to yourself 90% of the time.

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Joe Gagill in Wurtsboro, New York

15 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: haha, are you serious?

It makes perfect sense to get recommendations from previous coworkers. Why wouldn't it? It immediately lets any HR/recruiter know that the role was legitimate and that someone there liked you enough to recommend you to the world and add weight to your role. As for it being self promotion....well yeah. That's a part of job hunting, it's promoting yourself and your services to potential employers who could use those services. I don't get any sense of 'snobby high school girl' from it at all. That's going a tad overboard.

If the person had really generic recommendations and a million of them then yes, I'd be inclined to agree. If they're thoughtful and useful then why the hell not.

LinkedIn has been great for me, I get recruiters reaching out to me and I find the information gained on companies and connections within to be very worthwhile. I can see who the HR people are in the companies, learn about their backgrounds before going in to an interview etc.

It's a tool, its not going to necessarily land you a job but if you use it correctly it can help tremendously. Considering the number of people using it nowadays it doesn't hurt one bit to have an account and to keep it up to date. I also make sure to join groups that are in line with my industry and have noticed members checking out my profile.

None of these things will harm you (unless you're really stupid about it), they can only help.

I like people who regularly get the job done without bragging about it. That's me, maybe I'm old fashion. It's like a popularity contest this Linkedln.

I met a guy once at a job fair selling his book...David Dirks. Nice guy wasn't the best of communicators. You would never know that from reading his Linkedln posts. Totally different guy!

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jenab in Austin, Texas

15 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: If the person had really generic recommendations and a million of them then yes, I'd be inclined to agree. If they're thoughtful and useful then why the hell not.

LinkedIn has been great for me, I get recruiters reaching out to me and I find the information gained on companies and connections within to be very worthwhile. I can see who the HR people are in the companies, learn about their backgrounds before going in to an interview etc.

I've had two cold calls in the last two business days from recruiters because of my profile (from recruiters that have a solid rep and at least a few years in the biz, versus the unknowns). They didn't pan out because of location of the positions, but I know I'm on their radar.

Agreed about the generic recommendations; those really stand out, and as unlikely as some recruiters/HR may seem, they usually have good BS detectors. Too many looks odd. One or two per position, from a variety of people has some clout (clients, peers, direct managers, senior managers, and maybe some people whom you've supervised if relevant).

I like the group features, too, although finding ones that are unspammy can be a challenge.

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Bluetea in Texas

15 months ago

jenab in Austin, Texas said: I've had two cold calls in the last two business days from recruiters because of my profile (from recruiters that have a solid rep and at least a few years in the biz, versus the unknowns). They didn't pan out because of location of the positions, but I know I'm on their radar.

Agreed about the generic recommendations; those really stand out, and as unlikely as some recruiters/HR may seem, they usually have good BS detectors. Too many looks odd. One or two per position, from a variety of people has some clout (clients, peers, direct managers, senior managers, and maybe some people whom you've supervised if relevant).

I like the group features, too, although finding ones that are unspammy can be a challenge.

This is the problem that marketers have. Just because you have traffic doesn't mean you have a market to hawk your wares.

This thing has got to make money and right now, the stock has a P/E ratio of over 700%, which means that currently it is selling air.

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Jeff in Denver, Colorado

15 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: It makes perfect sense to get recommendations from previous coworkers. Why wouldn't it? It immediately lets any HR/recruiter know that the role was legitimate and that someone there liked you enough to recommend you to the world and add weight to your role. As for it being self promotion....well yeah. That's a part of job hunting, it's promoting yourself and your services to potential employers who could use those services. I don't get any sense of 'snobby high school girl' from it at all. That's going a tad overboard.

If I were a hiring manager, I would give very little weight to recommendations from co-workers, unless they contained some detailed information (e.g."Chris was knowledgeable enough about creating Use Cases to give seminars to the rest of the staff."). My experience is that most people (often unconsciously) base their evaluations of how good their co-workers are on how much they enjoy working with them.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

15 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: This is the problem that marketers have. Just because you have traffic doesn't mean you have a market to hawk your wares.

This thing has got to make money and right now, the stock has a P/E ratio of over 700%, which means that currently it is selling air.

What are you talking about? LinkedIn's profitability? Unlike Facebook, LinkedIn stock keeps exceeding expectations and forecasts.

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

15 months ago

Austin, Tx has a population of 850,000. I live in the biggest town in my county, population 70,000. Maybe that is why.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

15 months ago

Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York said: Austin, Tx has a population of 850,000. I live in the biggest town in my county, population 70,000. Maybe that is why.

That and we're a software development hub; and overpopulated with the sort of technogeeks who really love social media.

Just a suggestion; even if you don't plan on doing anything else on LinkedIn, you might want to check it occasionally for job postings on the job tab, especially if you're interested in large companies or tech companies (I'm not sure of your field).

And especially if you ever fill out online applications; it's two clicks to apply through LinkedIn (one to hit the apply button, a second to send even if you don't add a cover letter to it). It's the polar opposite of Taleo.

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Beth in Plano in Plano, Texas

15 months ago

You need to move to a bigger city with more jobs and women.

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