Two weeks after interview, no response, advice?

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Comments (26)

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario

22 months ago

Call again and then leave it alone.

Interviewers say all kinds of stuff. I would contact them one more time and find out whats going on...and keep applying in the meantime.

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Bluetea in Texas

22 months ago

clingingtohope in Westland, Michigan said: Hey guys,

I have been reading around here and I see it is not at all uncommon to go two weeks and not hear back about an interview. I thought I'd post my own topic though to get some feedback.

I interviewed Thursday 1/10 for a job in the mortgage field. I have five years customer service/hospitality experience and a year of real estate experience. I arrived very promptly and was complimented on this. Interviewer was the head of the department, VERY friendly guy, we joked a bit about a few things, interview was very smooth, about 20 minutes, he remarked that my experience was very fitting to what they were looking for, at the end of the interview he even said "if we decide to bring you aboard, the only problem I see is that we have the same name!" as a joke.

I neglected to ask for a timeframe when I left but I left saying "talk to you soon" and he said yes we would.

I sent an email thank you that same day, and to be sure I mailed one also. Last Friday (a week and one day after interview) I called and left him a voicemail that I was curious to their timeframe for hiring and if there was any information I could provide to aide in the decision making process. Tomorrow will be a week after that call and no call back.

They had five of the same positions to fill, it had been posted about five days when I interviewed and at that point he had only interviewed one other person.

Regardless of the story, you put your own time limit on the waiting game. For me, its 30 days. I mark it off on my calendar.

You also never stop looking no matter how bad you want a particular job. So much of this is a numbers' game.

Yeah, give them one more call and then end it.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

22 months ago

jenab in Austin, Texas said: I got a VM from a hiring manager telling me I wasn't picked for state position. I applied early December and interviewed a few weeks ago. The VM was very nice, and the manager mentioned they might have more positions opening in the coming months, and said to call her back.

I just got off the phone with her.....

I would almost consider drafting and mailing a letter to her (no e-mail) memorializing your followup phone conversation and reiterating your interest in future positions. In that conversation she opened the door; you have to walk through it.

Something similar worked for me. I had two interviews for my first paralegal job. The day after my second interview, the office manager called with the bad news. But - a few days later I received a letter from the shareholder telling me other positions would open and to stay in touch. I did. I immediately answered her letter with one of my own, thanking her for hers which I did not expect and updating her on related work I had discussed during my interview. I was hired a week later.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

22 months ago

Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: I would almost consider drafting and mailing a letter to her (no e-mail) memorializing your followup phone conversation and reiterating your interest in future positions. In that conversation she opened the door; you have to walk through it.

Agreed. I resisted my usual urge to do a thank you note immediately after the interview; being a state agency, the usual rules don't apply the process can be rather... rigid, and I didn't want to break any rules. Both she and the admin will be getting letters (the admin deserves a thanks just for the fact she had to walk me to every stop (3 in the building plus in and out of the building).

I probably shouldn't be so satisfied with a rejection; it helps I got a great contract lead earlier today (no probably of long term, but any work at the lead company would open a lot of doors).

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clingingtohope in Westland, Michigan

22 months ago

I think I may call the recruiter Monday or Tuesday for some information. I really do not want to seem like a pest, but I want them to know I am out there. It seems like it is a hard balance between the two.

I have interviewed for about six jobs in my six years of working and been offered a job each time (not accepted all of them...), so I am unfamiliar with this large response time and the aspect of not being offered a job...

Hiring five people in a span of ten business days I guess is a lot to ask. Also it is a new position in a new department, so all the pay, etc has to get worked out. They may just be weighing all their options. I am not giving out all hope, but not holding out much. I think it could go either way.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

22 months ago

clingingtohope in Westland, Michigan said: I think I may call the recruiter Monday or Tuesday for some information. I really do not want to seem like a pest, but I want them to know I am out there. It seems like it is a hard balance between the two.

If multiple days pass, you aren't being a pest. The "pests" are the candidates who call hourly, or call every day even though they were told it will be at least a week.

If there's a set time for a response, I usually contact a day or two after. If there's not, I usually call within 3-7 days, but after that first call back never more than once a week (and I might email instead of calling, since it's less intrusive).

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clingingtohope in Westland, Michigan

22 months ago

Do some companies have to have a job posted for a certain amount of time and interview before they act on hiring?

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Jake in Sycamore, Illinois

22 months ago

I earned my accounting degree in 2009 and I've had two jobs in the past 3-1/2 years. Upon an out-of-state relocation I've spent 6 months unemployed. I've found my experiences the past 6 months to be remarkably consistent, throughout the 80+ applications I've submitted and the 10 interviews I've been on since last summer.

1) Your "feel" for the interview is mostly irrelevant. Unless you know for sure that absolutely bombed it, your personal perspective on how you conducted yourself at the interview is not going to be indicative of anything relevant to how the hiring manager perceived you at the interview. You're too biased towards your own viability. This is why interview coaching (friends or family who will be brutally honest) is necessary before you get out there.

2) If they don't contact you after the interview, you aren't getting the job. I've been struck by the advice I've read/heard from others who suggest that if you repeatedly call either the interviewer or the HR analyst that this will have any impact on their decision. It won't. I have sent email thank yous, hand written letters, placed thank you calls - they're nice and I wouldn't say to not be courteous, but they are not going to affect the hiring decision at all.

3) NEVER turn down an actual job offer because you're waiting on contact from a possible offer elsewhere, unless the job offer you've been given is awful. Even if it's mediocre, take the position. Hiring managers complain about hiring someone who suddenly turn around and leave as soon as another job offer is given. They only have their own profession to blame for this by not consistently maintaining clear communication with applicants who are not actually in consideration. Take the job and bounce later.

4) Once you interview, put it away. Just move on. Don't dwell on it, unless you're using the experience to coach for the next one. It's a bear out there and this process will ruin your confidence if you let it.

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Jeff in Denver, Colorado

22 months ago

Jake in Sycamore, Illinois said: 1) Your "feel" for the interview is mostly irrelevant. Unless you know for sure that absolutely bombed it, your personal perspective on how you conducted yourself at the interview is not going to be indicative of anything relevant to how the hiring manager perceived you at the interview. You're too biased towards your own viability. This is why interview coaching (friends or family who will be brutally honest) is necessary before you get out there.

2) If they don't contact you after the interview, you aren't getting the job. I've been struck by the advice I've read/heard from others who suggest that if you repeatedly call either the interviewer or the HR analyst that this will have any impact on their decision. It won't. I have sent email thank yous, hand written letters, placed thank you calls - they're nice and I wouldn't say to not be courteous, but they are not going to affect the hiring decision at all.

1) For most jobs that don't require superior "people" skills (e.g., management, marketing), the interview is less important than what's on your resume. Employers are looking for a skills match and a cultural fit, and when they start the interview process they've often have already ranked the candidates. It takes an extremely good or extremely bad performance at an interview to get the to re-shuffle their ranking.

2) When you walk at the door at the end of the interview, they've pretty much decided whether or not they want to hire you.

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Jake in Sycamore, Illinois

22 months ago

Jeff in Denver, Colorado said: 1) For most jobs that don't require superior "people" skills (e.g., management, marketing), the interview is less important than what's on your resume. Employers are looking for a skills match and a cultural fit, and when they start the interview process they've often have already ranked the candidates. It takes an extremely good or extremely bad performance at an interview to get the to re-shuffle their ranking.

2) When you walk at the door at the end of the interview, they've pretty much decided whether or not they want to hire you.

It's difficult to make generalizations because every industry is different, but I have to say I mostly agree with both these points. Interviews are about personality, organizational fit, and verifying basic facts about your history. This is really all an interview should be about, ultimately. If you're among the top 5 of applicants, hiring managers have a basic idea where you rank before you show up, so they're looking to see if they like you and if you haven't completely BS'd your resume or work history.

Where companies fail in this regard is when they start turning the interview process into a beauty contest. No one needs 5 interviews to decide who to hire. There's something wrong with that firm, internally, if they're doing that. That's a warning sign to jobseekers. If someone is asking you to come in more than 2 or 3 times, they don't know what they want or they don't know how to recruit for their personnel needs. Stay away from those companies because you'll be back out looking again in 6 months anyway.

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Bluetea in Texas

22 months ago

Jake in Sycamore, Illinois said: It's difficult to make generalizations because every industry is different, but I have to say I mostly agree with both these points. Interviews are about personality, organizational fit, and verifying basic facts about your history. This is really all an interview should be about, ultimately. If you're among the top 5 of applicants, hiring managers have a basic idea where you rank before you show up, so they're looking to see if they like you and if you haven't completely BS'd your resume or work history.

Where companies fail in this regard is when they start turning the interview process into a beauty contest. No one needs 5 interviews to decide who to hire. There's something wrong with that firm, internally, if they're doing that. That's a warning sign to jobseekers. If someone is asking you to come in more than 2 or 3 times, they don't know what they want or they don't know how to recruit for their personnel needs. Stay away from those companies because you'll be back out looking again in 6 months anyway.

I agree. When I am scheduled for a 3rd interview, I feel like I should bring my accordian.

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Jake in Sycamore, Illinois

22 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: I agree. When I am scheduled for a 3rd interview, I feel like I should bring my accordian.

Yeah. It's painful, but you have to just decline to participate. "Thank you, but I'm pursuing other opportunities." Leave it at that. Beyond 2 or 3 interviews, don't bother wasting your time because all they're doing is wasting yours.

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Bluetea in Texas

22 months ago

Jake in Sycamore, Illinois said: Yeah. It's painful, but you have to just decline to participate. "Thank you, but I'm pursuing other opportunities." Leave it at that. Beyond 2 or 3 interviews, don't bother wasting your time because all they're doing is wasting yours.

You're right. The real slap in the face comes after you jump through all the hoops and see the job reposted, a month later.

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Jake in Sycamore, Illinois

22 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: You're right. The real slap in the face comes after you jump through all the hoops and see the job reposted, a month later.

That phenomena is another thing I meant to touch on earlier - thanks for bringing up the job reposting. I cannot reaffirm forcefully enough how bad of a sign it is when companies repeatedly repost the same position over and over.

All the possible reasons for this are bad. One reason could be that funding was pulled and they withdrew the listing. Obviously it's not a good sign if management either can't or won't commit to their staffing needs. Another reason is that their 1st tier candidate didn't work out. Well, what does that tell you? Another reason is that their SECOND tier candidates didn't work out, either. That speaks for itself. Another reason is that they've tweaked the description and opened it up for re-recruitment. That obviously means they have absolutely no idea what their staffing needs are and you're dealing with a group of bad managers who will not assist you in your career.

Honestly, this is all common sense stuff. But I think people have a real desire to prove themselves and accordingly, they're willing to internalize a lot of these bad outcomes out of a need to remain hopeful that they're being dealt with fairly. Well, listen up people - you aren't. This is a broken workforce and human resources as an industry has been thoroughly trashed over years of economic stagnation and professional outsourcing.

This is not to say that one should just give up, and it certainly isn't to say that you should allow any cynicism to creep into your personality while you're interviewing. But I think, just as a matter of self-perseverance, job seekers need to be realistic, at least to themselves, about what this process is really about.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

22 months ago

Jake in Sycamore, Illinois said: That phenomena is another thing I meant to touch on earlier - thanks for bringing up the job reposting. I cannot reaffirm forcefully enough how bad of a sign it is when companies repeatedly repost the same position over and over.
I wanted to change jobs, so I answered an ad for a job with a major downtown firm. I met most of the requirements, but was slightly weak on another. My rejection letter arrived a few days later.

The ad appeared again a few weeks later. I applied again. I was rejected again.

Repeat of the above. I didn't understand why - I did meet the qualifications. So I went against my personal policy of calling employers and called the in-house legal recruiter who had run the ad. Surprisingly, I was put through to her.

I said up front I wasn't expecting to be interviewed, but I did not understand why I hadn't been called, considering I met the requirements. The recruiter remembered me and asked me to hold on. I actually believed I might get an interview.

She came back on the line and explained that in the past her firm had "problems" with my firm. The call ended. I thought, "what problems." Then I remembered that the shareholder had squared off against the head of the practice group I would have worked in over a case. Also the shareholder had outlawyered in court a member of that practice group.

I never understood why I should have suffered guilt by association and be penalized because of these attorneys' petty egos. If they doubted any of my quals, they could have cleared them up during the interview.

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Jake in Sycamore, Illinois

22 months ago

Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: I wanted to change jobs, so I answered an ad for a job with a major downtown firm. I met most of the requirements, but was slightly weak on another. My rejection letter arrived a few days later.

The ad appeared again a few weeks later. I applied again. I was rejected again.

Repeat of the above. I didn't understand why - I did meet the qualifications. So I went against my personal policy of calling employers and called the in-house legal recruiter who had run the ad. Surprisingly, I was put through to her.

I said up front I wasn't expecting to be interviewed, but I did not understand why I hadn't been called, considering I met the requirements. The recruiter remembered me and asked me to hold on. I actually believed I might get an interview.

She came back on the line and explained that in the past her firm had "problems" with my firm. The call ended. I thought, "what problems." Then I remembered that the shareholder had squared off against the head of the practice group I would have worked in over a case. Also the shareholder had outlawyered in court a member of that practice group.

I never understood why I should have suffered guilt by association and be penalized because of these attorneys' petty egos. If they doubted any of my quals, they could have cleared them up during the interview.

Frankly I'm amazed they even spoke with you directly on the issue. Needless to say, your experience does NOT speak highly of the firm you were rejected for, at any level. Someone at some point should have been able say, wait a minute - we shouldn't reject an employee because we don't like who they used to work for. Clearly their culture not only prevented them from addressing the issue at (or soon after) the interview, but no one was able to move past that bias in the first place.

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Jake in Sycamore, Illinois

22 months ago

And, I suspect I may have experienced something similar as your situation, UP, a few months ago. I used to work for a regional hospital. I wasn't there very long - about a year - but was there long enough to complete a system upgrade successfully and to experience a full cycle of their business (I'm in accounting). They began to experience a significant staffing problem last summer, rather suddenly, losing a top manager and another member of their support staff. This shifted a lot of work onto me and some other staff in different departments in a very short amount of time. I was quickly reassigned to a different manager who had zero supervisory experience and I increasingly ran into conflict with some of the things she started having me do, like taking on work I expressly had no experience in or placing expectations on me that I didn't have time to identify or live up to because of the very short amount of time I was there. I tried to work with them on figuring out solutions to these problems, but frankly I didn't have a strong sense they knew what they were doing and I didn't feel comfortable staying under those conditions. At any rate, I was relatively new there and just decided to move on when the chance came. I gave them a 6 week notice and left the company on relatively good terms.

Fast forward a few months, and I had relocated elsewhere with my family. I applied to work at a local hospital. Even while recruitment was open, my application was rejected. No reason given. Same position opened up again a month later and I re-applied. Again, rejected, days after submitted my app. No reason given. I later found out that this hospital had just joined up with my previous employer. It's frustrating because I left on good terms, I was just wet behind the ears and didn't have the experience they needed to navigate all those personnel and duty changes they needed. But looking back on that, it's obvious that I was rejected because of my past affiliation.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

22 months ago

Jake in Sycamore, Illinois said: Frankly I'm amazed they even spoke with you directly on the issue. Needless to say, your experience does NOT speak highly of the firm you were rejected for, at any level. Someone at some point should have been able say, wait a minute - we shouldn't reject an employee because we don't like who they used to work for. Clearly their culture not only prevented them from addressing the issue at (or soon after) the interview, but no one was able to move past that bias in the first place.
A plausible excuse could have been the firm had to erect a Chinese wall around me because my firm and it had faced off in that case. I had worked a little on that case, but the firm did not know that. This firm is a major law firm in Denver.

Ironically, that partner whom the shareholder outlawyered at hearing became a judge. I don't believe that when my firm appeared before her at hearings we were treated fairly.

I applied to that firm a few more times. I'd bet my first firm's name caused my resume to be shtcanned, even after I had left the firm years before.

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Nimryl in Pottstown, Pennsylvania

17 months ago

Cheshire in Mississauga, Ontario said: Call again and then leave it alone.

Interviewers say all kinds of stuff. I would contact them one more time and find out whats going on...and keep applying in the meantime.

I started interviewing for a position about four weeks ago. I met with two people and had phone interviews with 3 people. I called two weeks ago and was told no decision was made at the time. I just fired off an email to the hiring manager and the HR Manager politely asking if the positions been filled, and still haven't heard anything. I will never apply for a position with this company again if I don't hear something by the end of the week. Rudeness sets the tone for how the company is structured so its probably a blessing that they don't respond.

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PBm3 in Manchester, United Kingdom

12 months ago

I had an interview for a large retail clothing company on Friday 25th Oct. I've not heard anything since. It's now 7th Nov!!
I was told that they had 11 people to interview that DAY and that the successful short listed candidates would be called back in to do a practical interview. Yes, my fault for not asking when, but when I left I said " I'll look forward to hearing from you soon". Not a dickie bird! And I'm NOT impressed at all.
In my opinion, if you ATTEND an interview, the decent thing that a "decent" company should do is to keep you informed as to whether you've progressed to the next stage or not. (Remember, this could be 11 short calls or a mail merge, it's not hundreds of applications!).THIS SHOULD BE DONE AS A MINIMUM REQUIREMENT!! I was previously a retail manager and ANYONE who takes the time and effort to come to an interview should be notified one way or the other.
If you're just sending a generic application, then fair enough... " Don't call us, we'll call you" scenario.
The thing that really annoys me is that this company is massive! World wide!
If this is how they treat people at an early stage, Some just won't bother with that company again.

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Bluetea in Texas

12 months ago

PBm3 in Manchester, United Kingdom said: In my opinion, if you ATTEND an interview, the decent thing that a "decent" company should do is to keep you informed as to whether you've progressed to the next stage or not. (Remember, this could be 11 short calls or a mail merge, it's not hundreds of applications!).THIS SHOULD BE DONE AS A MINIMUM REQUIREMENT!!

LOL! Most companies are not decent.

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arrt51 in Cornwall, Ontario

9 months ago

REALITY 101:
Ok Kids pay attention. You need to understand several things:
1) HR Departments (generally speaking) are NOT anyone’s friends. Not friends of the employer or employee/ potential employee. They are self a serving department that has long since lost its original purpose, which was to look out for the employee. HR departments have manipulated themselves into a very powerful position that holds employer and employee hostage much like a cancer. Currently the HR/interviewer can't be impacted or removed without killing the patient [that would be YOU]. Sadly other than a complete dis-mantling of HR departments there is not a cure. This is a complex incestuous situation. Remember those that can't do, teach and those that can't teach, go into the HR fields....resulting in more times than not, a bunch of frustrated "bed-wetter’s".

2) Thanks to a terrible economy employers and HR departments have a "buyers" market" resulting that for every one job posting they are receiving hundreds to thousands of applications of which they will pick and choose. Their selection process are based on years of "HR" permutations and combinations developed over the years to allow them to use criteria designed to make the HR person’s life easier not yours. (E.g. 7 seconds of review for your curriculum vitae to catch their eyes, HR check the box criteria survey’s, mistaking certifications as qualifications) and the list goes on.
3) “NO FEEDBACK POLICY” results in HR and interviewers’ arrogance, rudeness and dismissive attitudes; “don’t call us we’ll call you”, “we ask the questions here not you” and this is the result of things as they are today. I mean come on do you actually expect hiring personnel to work hard???? When it’s all that they can do to put together a proper job posting????
4) THE FIX FOR THIS is for applicants to boycott the “NO FEEDBACK POLICY” (yes) here is the cure:
As soon as the potential employer contacts you for either a face-to-face or phone interview t

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arrt51 in Cornwall, Ontario

9 months ago

cont'd
4) THE FIX FOR THIS is for applicants to boycott the “NO FEEDBACK POLICY” (yes) here is the cure:
As soon as the potential employer contacts you for either a face-to-face or phone interview the very first question you need to ask is this:
Upon completion of this interview (Mr.-Ms. HR/Interviewer) what is your interview feedback policy in terms of providing more than thank you for your application but we have decided to select another candidate But we will keep your application on file for future job openings…(or some other BS)?

WAIT FOR THEM TO ANSWER…….if they come back with the above then you now have two choices; Accept it and move on OR say;

“Based upon the feedback policy which you just stated you must understand that in a post interview situation I require more than a “boiler-plated HR dust off” and for this reason I withdraw my application for your consideration…….yep takes a lot of grit to do this however if more applicants would take this approach hiring companies would be forced to modify this rude and dismissive protocol.

5) Summary: if you yourself are a from the “bed-wetter’s” generation applying to other “bed-wetter’s” then you get what you get.

Hope that this as put some perspective into why things are as they are. Best of success to everyone in their career searches.

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why would anyone call it funemployment? in Wilton, Connecticut

9 months ago

The worst is when they promise to contact you "tomorrow" with feedback, and then you're still left hanging over a week later.

Why is it that HR stalks you up until the interview, unnecessarily inflates your ego saying things like "you're perfect for this role," "everyone on the team wants to meet you," etc, then after the interview it's "we'll be in touch by tomorrow! We want to hire someone very soon."

You could at LEAST be in touch saying you don't have news. The anxiety of waiting by the phone/checking email compulsively is the worst. I have so much pent up rage from the last 9 months of unemployment, I can't even start talking about it!

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Overqualified in Phillipsburg, New Jersey

6 months ago

Unfortunately I've probably have everyone on this trail beat. I've 25+ years of experience. Been interviewing at the VP and SVP level in the Fortune 500. For my field I'm a recruiters wet dream, trust me. Recently traveled 15 hours for a 1 hour interview with a senior executive of an international company.

Yes, that's right folks 15 hours travel for a 1 hour interview. Now been 2+ weeks without any feedback at all. I've dropped 2 emails to the recruiter, asking if feedback's been provided. No reply.

After 25 years I think my gut instincts are very good. Interview went great. Interviewer said the look forward to having me continue on in the process.

Mind you everyone in the loop (HR and Recruiter) knows this was no short excursion. Left my house at 7am, took Amtrak R/T and didn't cross my home's threshold until 10:30 pm that night. For what was touted as a critical executive level role, needing to be filled ASAP.

Had a similar situation recently as well where after 7 interviews HR NEVER responded to 2x emails to let me know one way or another what happened.

Bottom line, regardless of level the "HR Function" takes their sweet time. Completely unprofessional or mediocre at best. Knowing they'll likely never see you again, so being rude is an acceptable practice.

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ccccsdad in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

2 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said:

I'd say the best practice is to resist every impulse in your body, and if you receive notification that you were not chosen, of if you never receive any type of notice, always follow up with a "thank you so much for considering me for this position, I'm sorry you decided on another candidate, but please keep me in mind if things do not work out, or if you have any other openings you feel I might be a good fit for."

Then, move on. Never burn any bridges, NEVER!!

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