Interviewing for a job that a temp is in now

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Loretta in Chicago, Illinois

57 months ago

I recently went on an interview for a position that I thought I was a good fit for. This was through an employment agency. When I called the agency a few days later to get feedback on my interview, the response was that they went with another candidate. That person was already working there as a temp and they decided to offer her the position. Why did they waste my time if she was already working there and they liked her and knew she would take the job? I also brought this up on my networking meeting and another person mentioned that she once worked a temp assignment, was there almost a year, and they offered her the job, and that company had to post every position on their website for 5 days before they would even begin the process of bringing me on as an employee, then after 5 days an offer letter was sent and she had to take a drug test and they did a background test. That was the rule for all temps that this large company hired as employees. Why do they waste the time of outsiders when they have a zero percent chance of getting a job no matter how well they interview or would fit in?

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Joanna in Berwyn, Illinois

57 months ago

I know that agencies collect resumes, but what do they really do with them. How does that make money for them?

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No Job 2009 in Burlington, Vermont

57 months ago

The last job that I got through an employment agency was in 1999 it was a direct hire and it was a piece of cake compared with what I hear goes on with agencies today. They did call my former supervisor back then to verify employment and the first and only interview that they sent me on resulted in a job that lasted me until this year. Back then temps were not as popular as they are now, as health insurance was not a hugh expense on employers as it is now. Yes I had to pay for insurance, but it was peanuts. So the people who go to "interview" with them today do any of them get direct hire jobs? I hear they always ask if a candidate will work temp "while they are waiting" for an opportunity to come along. I say it is harder to get a job while you are working, I know I have been told the opposite. I look at it this way. You have to take time off to interview and you don't get paid, and if they interview you for a job that you do not stand a chance that is even more fustrating, as if you are unemployed you don't have to make up excuses to go to the doctor to get a few hours off.

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mary in Tampa, Florida

57 months ago

Most employers want someone who already has a job. If you already have a job, then you look like you're successful and a great employee. When you don't have one, they are looking for what's wrong with you, why don't you have a job. Even go on a job interview, and the person said, "What happened to your last job?"

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Loretta in Chicago, Illinois

57 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said:
Also, from what I understand, some companies may have government contracts with provisions requiring them to consider X number of candidates.

Finally, agencies bring in candidates to interview for reasons other than to fill a position. They bring them in to collect resumes, build a candidate database to show off to clients, gather intel on other companies, or simply to up body count. You can try agencies, but don't believe everything they tell you.

Good luck with your job search.

People post resumes on Careerbuilder & Monster, they can just pull them off those sites and say that they compared those with the current candidate and they chose to bring her on as an employee. She has been doing the job already so they know what they are getting, just switching the paycheck from Manpower to company X and giving benefits to the employee and perhaps a salary adjustment. The agency is happy they made a sale, or are they, as they cannot charge X per hour worked by the temp anymore, but there most be a buyout amount? Someone told me that if you temp for the contract term of 4 months, they they can hire you if they like your performance and want to keep you.

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Loretta in Chicago, Illinois

57 months ago

I agree it is stupid to have such a requirement, as the candidate goes to the interview hopping to get a job, and sometimes later finds out that they wasted a candidates time to protect themselves and show that they compared the temp with others, when actualy they just interview to "talk" with others to see how they answer questions and maybe learn how to interview better themselves in the future.

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Loretta in Chicago, Illinois

57 months ago

Displaced Legal Professional in Denver, Colorado said: By now you've undoubtedly figured out that hiring annoys companies and they could care less about candidates and their time - though, if you think about it, unemployed candidates have nothing but time they should devote to jobhunting. Companies regard candidates as beef on the the hoof and a subhuman life form. Their treatment of candidates may improve - somewhat - after they are hired.

Well put!

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

57 months ago

AmeriPlan???!!! Why not Avon??? Better yet, MaryKay!!!

I think I'm going to go door-to-door selling little baggies of weed.

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Taken Advantage of Candidate in Hoffman Estates, Illinois

57 months ago

Agencies make big $ on temporary help, which is what they are mainly interested in. They pay the temp something like $10 per hour and charge the client something like $20 and you do not get any benefits. Next week is Christmas, no work no pay, unless you have been on assignment most of 2009 as you have to rack up X amount of hours, and if you take time off for a family vacation or personal time, you don't get paid and it takes longer to reach the number of hours needed to get holiday pay and if you do work over 40 hours in any week they don't even count those hours, which is not right either, but they always play dirty...anything to cheat the temp and put the money in their commision checks. Just wait till the economy turns around in 5 years, they will be calling people at their jobs trying to get them to take jobs they are looking to place and can't find the talent they need.

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

57 months ago

This past month I have been contacted by four empoyment agencies - which I didn't call. Just today I had an e-mail from Special Counsel.

Two years ago I went to Todays Staffing. They have a real spiffy brouchure, how you can qualify for medical insurance if you work so many hours. Of course, I never got an assignment, and they went me on one interview that was truly the lowest in a paralegal job. After twenty years of experience and a Bachelor's Degree and an AA in paralega, I thought the interview was insulting.

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Deep In Debt in Chicago, Illinois

57 months ago

mary in Tampa, Florida said: Most employers want someone who already has a job. If you already have a job, then you look like you're successful and a great employee. When you don't have one, they are looking for what's wrong with you, why don't you have a job. Even go on a job interview, and the person said, "What happened to your last job?"

Employers will ask everyone why they left their previous jobs, I have 3 jobs listed on my resume and they ask why about all 3 of them. In this economy I am sure that many of the applicates were laid off, and with unemployment at 10% on the news constantly they know that getting a job is not easy. I know quite a few people who have been laid off in some point of 2009 and they are still looking for a job similar to what they had, some are doing retail for the holidays and volunteer work to get come income and be exposed to people to network with, but have not even clome close to landing a job, they are willing to step down in pay, but not a single offer comes along, sometimes they even think that employers are not hiring anyone that they see, as some may want to add for the 2010 budget, but at least they can extend and offer and say start January 4, which if it was me, I would me happy knowing I will start the new year with a job.

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staffer in Tampa, Florida

57 months ago

Taken Advantage of Candidate in Hoffman Estates, Illinois said: Agencies make big $ on temporary help, which is what they are mainly interested in. They pay the temp something like $10 per hour and charge the client something like $20 and you do not get any benefits.

I would beg to differ. Usually it is more like a pay of $10 and a charge to the client of $15, more than a 50% markup these days is hard to come by. Out of that difference the agency still needs pay out to cover your unemployment insurance, workers compensation insurance, liability insurance, and match your medicare and social security contributions. Once that is taken off, they then need to pay their staff of recruiters (to filter through all of the resumes, talk to hundreds of candidates, and remember all of them in order to match them up with the right client and opportunity) and payroll associates and back office staff (to make sure you get your paycheck on time and all the correct taxes are taken out and remitted timely to the government). After internal staff is paid then they need to pay for the office they are in, the internet they are using to read your emails, the phone that you called them on, paycheck stock, W-2 stock, envelopes, stamps for your weekly check to get to you, paper for the copier, files to keep your documents in order and up to state regulations, and all the other small things that it takes to keep that office running.

Sorry to break the news to you, but we work hard for the little money we get. No one is out to get you.

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staffer in Tampa, Florida

57 months ago

I almost forgot to add that out of that little margin also comes the drug test that we had to send you for and the three background checks we are required by law to perform. Plus each one of those electronic aptitude tests that you take costs money.

Also factor into that the tens of candidates before you that assured us they would follow through on finishing their paperwork, would have no issues on the background check and were completely drug free...and lied. Those costs don't go away and each of those follow up calls and interviews takes time.

Or you could factor in the candidates that pass all of those steps but then decide that they would rather collect unemployment then work the few shifts that we have available. Apparently society now is completely okay with not working for their money and turning down paid employment is not a problem. Remember that when you see those unemployment figures, some of those people have been offered jobs, they would just prefer to feed off a struggling unemployment system.

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

57 months ago

I understand the reasoning for background checks. I worked in litigation for an attorney who did banking litigation. We had many cases dealing with background checks.

Example: A doctor hires someone out of the newspaper as his office manager. The person is stealing money. The person has a previous criminal record for the same offense. Six months go by, after bank statements, doctor finds out. The doctor cannot collect from the Bank because: (1) bank statements came, doctor did not review them; (2) the doctor failed to do a background check.

Example: Placement agency gets sued because it placed an employee, employee steals money from bank account; agency is liable because it failed to do the proper background check.

It has nothing to do with what the law requires. I have seen scenario over and over and over where proper background checks would have uncovered previous activity for the same offense.

One doctor found out his manager was stealing his manager because he was low on money in his personal account on a weekend, he was going to take a draw at the ATM - INSUFFICIENT FUNDS. This was a doctor, a surgeon. Another doctor had a "house call" to his house at night by bank officials because a bank employee saw suspicious activity on his business account, tried to contact him at work, and couldn't make contact; so the bank sent someone to his house.

One doctor who hired someone out of the paper lost $37,000. The person had a previous record for same activity.

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friend in Tampa, Florida

57 months ago

www.odh.ohio.gov/ASSETS/B0492B4E3EF24EBDA0EE0D79731F498A/Fr13_03.PDF

Up to 2 (BCI and FBI) are required by law for the healthcare industry, the others are a national criminal database search, and OIG and EPLS searches which are normally required by contract and JCAHO.

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