What is the next logical step after admin?

Get new comments by email
You can cancel email alerts at anytime.
Comments (36)

Holly Keisic in North Tonawanda, New York

82 months ago

Laura in Dallas, Texas said: I am a great admin, no doubt about it. But, as with most in the profession, I am sick of it. I'm sick of being a babysitter, travel arranger, party planner, computer guru, etc. However, as someone without a college degree, I have not had enough confidence to try to make a leap in the past. I feel pigeonholed by others and myself. What is the best way forward? I currently work at a mortgage company and I have no desire to get into sales or operations, which are the only places to "go" from my position. I am fairly savvy when it comes to HR/marketing. Is my best bet finding a decent assistant position in these fields and working my way up? I am in my mid-30s now (I worked in education for most of my 20s and made the switch to an admin role about 7 years ago) and I don't want to wake up and be 40 and still doing everyone else's work for them. Anyone have any experience in this capacity?

Laura,

I am 53 yrs old. My first job was when I was 18 yrs old as what they call a "copy typist" for an insurance company. I grew in every position I have had, and even left temporarily in my early twenty's go to college. I have been an administrative assistant, marketing assistant, office manager, supervisor, legal assistant and medical secretary. (I just wanted to give you some idea from where my opinion about your situation is drawn from). I have worked for a software company, private attorney, law firm, insurance company, retail clothing store, engineering firm and medical office. So, what I have come to realize about the administrative support position is that it allows you the opportunity to do your best in just about any professonal forum. The same tools you bring to a legal position are the same tools you bring to a banking position as an admin. assistant. You could find happiness in admin support just by choosing a different field to do what you do best. Effectively relating to people is probably your strength..Enjoy!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (37) / No (43) Reply - Report abuse

Paul Anderson in Kirkland, Washington

82 months ago

Laura,

Two questions for you to consider.

1.What is your passion? What do you really want to do if money, time, etc was no objection.
2. How much money do you want to make right now?

I've worked a lot with administrative assistances and I'd have to say it's a pretty tough job. You guys work the most and sorry to say get paid way less than you deserve. I've coached admins to become multiple roles.

Titles have included:
* Project Coordinator
* Business Analyst
* Project Manager
* Web/form Designer

It all depends on your long term interests and on the salary you're looking for. Each of the positions I mentioned pay anywhere between $25 - $65/hr and you can make that jump right now.

Here is a few things you need to start:

1. New marketing plan. Job searching is all about marketing. You are saying I'm the best person that can do this job - hire me. In order to be effective in marketing you need to become clear about what you want. Get as clear as possible. Once you know what you want, ask yourself why you want it. Either have 1,000 regular whys or 5-10 compelling whys. This will create momentum and you'll be pulled toward your goals in the future instead of having to will power yourself in the present moment. Good whys will usually give you good hows; if you don't know a way you'll find a way.
2. Peer group. Too often I notice admins hanging out with people at their salary level. While is it perfectly OK to have lots of friends/co-workers that you socialize you with, it's mandatory to find a higher-income peer group if you want to start making more money. Personally everytime I got a raise or moved up the ladder, I had less to do. I did a lot more in McDonald's flipping burgers making $5.15/hr than I do now as manager of fortune 500 company making well into the 6-figures. I did however have to drop my current peer group.
Continued below...

Paul Anderson (Performance Coach)
[Edited by Host] Contact info deleted

Please do not post Contact info in the forums.
If you would like to set

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (72) / No (5) Reply - Report abuse

Paul Anderson in Kirkland, Washington

82 months ago

3. Get a new resume. Give your new targetted position(s) + your current resume to a professional. These days you can get an awesome looking resume for about $150. Shop around the internet, there are plenty of them. Remember, this is the only sales material you have about yourself to the employer.
4. Get coaching on interviewing. Once you're ready to move on from admin to say business analyst, you need to display a different level of confidence. You need a new interviewing strategy that assures the employer that you can do this job. Trust me, you'll be doing less but getting paid more :-)

Let me know if you have more questions,
Regards,
Paul Anderson (Performance Coach)
[Edited by Host] Contact info deleted

Please do not post Contact info in the forums.
If you would like to set up a profile please go here to log in
www.indeed.com/my/profile

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (34) / No (7) Reply - Report abuse

Paul

82 months ago

I hear what you are saying in regard to finding one's passion and the whole "what would I do if money were not an issue". But how many people can actually say money is not an issue? Trust me, I work because I have a mortgage and car payment and a lifestyle I enjoy. I'm single and self-supporting, so if I take a lower paying job to pursue my passion, I don't have anyone who will be picking up the slack. I've been an admin for close to 25 yrs and now, make good money and have grown accustom to it. I want out of this line of work, but sadly, I get paid better than most of my friends who have those all important degrees. I feel stuck!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (24) / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

Terry

82 months ago

Sorry everyone - new to this site. I incorreclty filled the form. The comments regarding one's passion doesn't pay the bills was directly TO: Paul, not FROM: Paul.
I'm Terry, relpying to Paul

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Paul Anderson in Kirkland, Washington

82 months ago

Terry said: Sorry everyone - new to this site. I incorreclty filled the form. The comments regarding one's passion doesn't pay the bills was directly TO: Paul, not FROM: Paul.
I'm Terry, relpying to Paul

Hi Terry, that's a great comment. So many times we think we have a take a lower pay to pursue our passion. This is in practicality is not true. Let me make an example. When I worked with one Admin, she said that her passion was making a difference. That really made her happy. We identified how much difference she was making in her current position. Then we assessed how much difference she would make (let's say) in a Program Management position. When we were done, it was clear to her that she could pursue her passion, make a bigger impact on the company and keep on the pathway of her ultimate goal. She immediatly switched positions, got into a new mindset, became a program manager and now is a VP at a mid-size company. She now makes 10X what she made before and is living her dreams. Find your passion, your true dream. Find your bigger purpose. While at times you might have to make a small sacrifice (or not) ultimately you'll be doing what you love and making the money you love.

Paul Anderson (Performance Coach)
[Edited by Host] Contact info deleted

Please do not post Contact info in the forums.
If you would like to set up a profile please go here to log in
www.indeed.com/my/profile
Actualize Your True Potential Today

Just curious. What is your passion? What do you really want to do? What business do you want to own?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (11) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Laura in Dallas, Texas

82 months ago

Paul, thank you for your answers. I have to say I am a little dismayed by your comments re: peer groups. I mean, I guess you don't often see the CEO hanging out with the receptionist, but your comments seem very cutthroat. Is that really how it is? Dump all your friends and get friends who make more money?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (9) / No (10) Reply - Report abuse

Paul Anderson in Kirkland, Washington

82 months ago

Yes and no. While it sounds harsh your beliefs are shaped by your peer group. Too often we'll get excited or passionate about a new idea or start moving up in our careers. This will often threaten the peer group and unconsciously they will either sabotage you or discourage you from success. It's not that they're bad people; it's that they are afraid of losing you.

Good note. If you have friends who you love and can't afford to lose, take them up with you. In order to change your salary, your belief systems about what is possible or not you need to find a new peer group.

Let me make an example. There was this man who didn't have health as a value. He ate a lot of food, smoked, drank alcohol daily, and didn't exercise. He came to the therapist begging for help because his brother and father had died at the age of 48 and he was 47. It was apparent that with that lifestyle he'd have to either give up a lot of his habits or risk dying at a young age. Once they aligned his values and added health to a higher priority he automatically stopped hanging out with his bbq and beer buddies. He started working out at Gold's gym and how new friends that supported his new values.

Peers will shape your belief systems, your values, and your habits. Be cautious about who you primarily socialize with because as in everything, there are consequences.

Thanks Laura

Thanks Laura

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (25) / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

Blake Lucas in Fayetteville, North Carolina

82 months ago

Laura in Dallas, Texas said: I am a great admin, no doubt about it. But, as with most in the profession, I am sick of it. I'm sick of being a babysitter, travel arranger, party planner, computer guru, etc. However, as someone without a college degree, I have not had enough confidence to try to make a leap in the past. I feel pigeonholed by others and myself. What is the best way forward? I currently work at a mortgage company and I have no desire to get into sales or operations, which are the only places to "go" from my position. I am fairly savvy when it comes to HR/marketing. Is my best bet finding a decent assistant position in these fields and working my way up? I am in my mid-30s now (I worked in education for most of my 20s and made the switch to an admin role about 7 years ago) and I don't want to wake up and be 40 and still doing everyone else's work for them. Anyone have any experience in this capacity?

Laura,

The responses you have received to date are all good and offer alot of good information. However, I differ a bit. You see we are in the same boat. I also don't have a degree, and started my career as a clerk then assistant then Office Manager and finally Operations Manager for a national nonprofit.

I would ask you to discern what you can offer to any employer. Start by identifying your likes, not only personal ones but also work style. Then find what it is that makes you such a good Admin and use that to get your foot in the door. At the same time, I highly reccommend that you pursue not only your degree, as I am, but if money and time is the issue then find a couple of continuing education classes they are usually flexible with time and relatively cheap. Also look up SHRM, HRPD, AMA they helped me alot.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (4) / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

Patricia in Ottawa, Ontario

80 months ago

I wrote an article on my blog Thinking Outside the Job Description Box that I think would help you. It is about what other areas assistants can move into or how to make your current job more challenging.

Patricia
secretaryhelpline.blogspot.com/2008/03/thinking-outside-job-description-box.html

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (4) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

JAMIE in Upper Marlboro, Maryland

80 months ago

I feel for you. I have a bachelor's degree and currently completing my Master's in Public Administration. I took a work study job supporting Administration at the college which pays minimum wage. Before this, I was a professional IBM Mainframe Computer Programmer and an Information Engineer who earned a good salary before jobs were out sourced to East India.

I find that being an Admin Assistant is awful. You get no respect and are passed over when job openings come up. Take the time to get good references, more education and take a leap into another field. That's my advice to you.

I believe the fewer admin support people available the more in demand they will become later and the more respect they will be able to command in the future.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (17) / No (5) Reply - Report abuse

Anonymous in Indianapolis, Indiana

78 months ago

Laura in Dallas, Texas said: I am a great admin, no doubt about it. But, as with most in the profession, I am sick of it. I'm sick of being a babysitter, travel arranger, party planner, computer guru, etc. However, as someone without a college degree, I have not had enough confidence to try to make a leap in the past. I feel pigeonholed by others and myself. What is the best way forward? I currently work at a mortgage company and I have no desire to get into sales or operations, which are the only places to "go" from my position. I am fairly savvy when it comes to HR/marketing. Is my best bet finding a decent assistant position in these fields and working my way up? I am in my mid-30s now (I worked in education for most of my 20s and made the switch to an admin role about 7 years ago) and I don't want to wake up and be 40 and still doing everyone else's work for them. Anyone have any experience in this capacity?

Were you a teacher before this? Personally, I would go back to education. If you don't, you will be pigeonholed into being an assistant the rest of your life. If you can reconcile to doing things so everyone else can have a career, stay where you are. But, if you prefer to use your mind and have your own career, best to move on.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (6) Reply - Report abuse

Anonymous in Indianapolis, Indiana

78 months ago

Paul Anderson in Kirkland, Washington said: Hi Terry, that's a great comment. So many times we think we have a take a lower pay to pursue our passion. This is in practicality is not true. Let me make an example. When I worked with one Admin, she said that her passion was making a difference. That really made her happy. We identified how much difference she was making in her current position. Then we assessed how much difference she would make (let's say) in a Program Management position. When we were done, it was clear to her that she could pursue her passion, make a bigger impact on the company and keep on the pathway of her ultimate goal. She immediatly switched positions, got into a new mindset, became a program manager and now is a VP at a mid-size company. She now makes 10X what she made before and is living her dreams. Find your passion, your true dream. Find your bigger purpose. While at times you might have to make a small sacrifice (or not) ultimately you'll be doing what you love and making the money you love.

Paul Anderson (Performance Coach)
[Edited by Host] Contact info deleted

Please do not post Contact info in the forums.
If you would like to set up a profile please go here to log in
www.indeed.com/my/profile
Actualize Your True Potential Today

Just curious. What is your passion? What do you really want to do? What business do you want to own?

I agree with all your comments; however, sometimes people are stopped dead in their tracks by companies that do not allow them to move out of these positions--no matter how skilled and motivated they are to move on to new challenges. These people would love to get out of these roles and get into more satisfying jobs where they are not just servants to others, but will never be allowed to do so as long as they remain with companies who control what jobs they can pursue. It is a terrible waste of someone's life when they cannot utilize all their skills and talents.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (20) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Patricia in Ottawa, Ontario

78 months ago

I was interested to read your post because I had been thinking of this very thing. Someone I know went through a similar experience. She was a very good admin who made a very bad judgment call and got fired for it. She has since been re-employed somewhere else and I think honesty had a lot to do with it. If you admit your mistake and are sincere and don't wait for them to "find" out about it, sometimes an employer will take a chance. People who have been given a second chance can make a very loyal employee.

If you get an interview and they ask you why you left your previous employment, be honest and upfront and admit you made a mistake, but have learned from it and want to prove yourself to them.

All the best to you and thanks for sharing. I think you are off to a good start. I am going to write an article on my blog about this type of thing, but haven't completed it yet so your commments were timely for me. You have given me something to think about.

Patricia
secretaryhelpline.blogspot.com/

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

KR in San Francisco, California

77 months ago

Admins typically go into other support roles, HR, Marketing, or Managerial fields. If you are a legal secretary, consider becoming a paralegal. If you are a medial secretary, a step up would be into medical assisting. Here's an outline with salary figures of popular career paths:

www.adminsecret.com/benefits/180-admin-career-journeys

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Patricia in Ottawa, Ontario

77 months ago

fancyone in Florence, South Carolina said: HELLO I AM JUST LOOKING FOR SOME ADVISE IH AVE BEEN IN AN ADMINISTRATIVE ROLE WITH THE SAME COMPANY FOR 12YRS THE PAST 7YRS I WAS THE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/OFFICE MANAGER. RECENTLY I WAS PLACE ON SUSPENSION FOR CHANGING A STATE DOCUMENT WHICH CONSTITUTE AS FRAUD SO I RESIGN FROM THE COMPANY DUE TO THE I NEEDED THE MONEY WITH GETTING MY LEAVE PAY AND RETIREMENT BECAUSE I DID NOT NO HOW LONG MY CASE WOULD BE PENDING. SINCE I HAVE NEVER BEEN IN TROUBLE BEFORE I AM ABLE TO ATTEND A FORGIVENESS PROGRAM WHICH MEANS I WILLNOT HAVE A CRIMMINAL RECORD. CAN SOME ONE PLEASE TELL ME HOW CAN I BOUNCE BACK FROM THIS. I AM A GREAT ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT I HAVE GOOD COMPUTER SKILLS INCLUDING LAPTOP TROUBLE SHOOTING. I HAVE ASLO MASTERED CUSTOMER SERVICE AND TELEPHONE SKILLS. I AM A QUICK LEARNER AND CAN ADAPT TO ANY SITUATION. CAN ANYONE GIVE ME ANY ADVISE.

THANKS
SALLY

I finally wrote that article I mentioned earlier. I call it Second Chances. Here it is:

secretaryhelpline.blogspot.com/2008/06/second-chances.html

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

Maren in Minneapolis, Minnesota

77 months ago

This has been very insightful from all of you, because I too am looking to venture out into something different than a "thankless" Admin. Asst. position. I actually left a big Fortune 100 company 8 years ago and followed my passion as an Interior Designer - went back to school and got my degree, worked in several different retail positions for awhile and then opened up my own business, which I still have. I love what I do, but with the economy the way it is right now I had to face the reality of falling back into an Admin. Asst. position. My customer service and marketing skills have really developed in the last 5 years and I want to utilize my combined skills. I really feel that my resume is preventing me from getting a job because of my business being listed - I can't hide it, it would be too big of a gap. Also, the industry is flooded with Admin. Asst. looking for jobs right now so that is even lessening my chances. I have been in a contract position as a Sales Administrator for 6 months that is soon coming to an end.

Any comments, suggestions would be helpful.

Thanks,
Maren

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

I'm your Gal Friday in Tacoma, Washington

77 months ago

Maren in Minneapolis, Minnesota said: This has been very insightful from all of you, because I too am looking to venture out into something different than a "thankless" Admin. Asst. position. I actually left a big Fortune 100 company 8 years ago and followed my passion as an Interior Designer - went back to school and got my degree, worked in several different retail positions for awhile and then opened up my own business, which I still have. I love what I do, but with the economy the way it is right now I had to face the reality of falling back into an Admin. Asst. position. My customer service and marketing skills have really developed in the last 5 years and I want to utilize my combined skills. I really feel that my resume is preventing me from getting a job because of my business being listed - I can't hide it, it would be too big of a gap. Also, the industry is flooded with Admin. Asst. looking for jobs right now so that is even lessening my chances. I have been in a contract position as a Sales Administrator for 6 months that is soon coming to an end.

Any comments, suggestions would be helpful.

Thanks,
Maren

I would list your company, and give yourself a title relevant to the position you are seeking, such as "manager of marketing," or "financial guru," or whatever. List the new skills you gained, so it is a segue into your next endeavor. Owning a business is valuable experience, make it pay!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Asha in Miami, Florida

76 months ago

Laura

i can so identify with your feelings. I too am sick of being giving instructions and made to feel that you are there to serve!

I hav e been trying hell hard to get out of it myself and even turned down a 48,000 a year job 2 mths ago. i am now at home again.

But why not give thought to getting into Teaching. That is what i am doing. You can do a Alternative Certification Program and get a Teaching position. Or why not consider going back to school and getting a degree in education. It is a very rewarding field.

I am 34 and dont want to wake up at 37 feeling like im still serving a buncha ungrateful people! I hate admin even though i have to do that for a while until i get myself qualified to do something else.

Asha

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (4) / No Reply - Report abuse

Asha in Miami, Florida

76 months ago

Laura

This is Asha again. Email this person. Her name is siser Mary and she can prepare a super resume for you and get you better jobs. Tell her Asha Harriott was your contact.

She can send your new resume into the hands of potential employers for jobs that build on admin experience and it pays as much as 57000 a year. email here asap.

all the best
Asha
<Edited by Host: contact info removed>

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (6) Reply - Report abuse

Asha in Miami, Florida

76 months ago

careerexpertsmf@gmail.com - sister mary's email for the resume

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (6) Reply - Report abuse

Asha in Miami, Florida

76 months ago

Hey thanks for that website. I can now seek to move up and out of admin building on what i have learnt from the field.

Thanks

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

Julia in Whittemore, Iowa

75 months ago

Asha in Miami, Florida said: careerexpertsmf@gmail.com - sister mary's email for the resume

Laura and anyone else who has looked into this "so-called" Sister Mary and her "help" .. this is a scam and here is a link to ripoff report supporting that dear sweet sister mary has been at this for literally years.

www.ripoffreport.com/reports/0/350/RipOff0350479.htm

Be careful out there .... we haven't been working this hard in the field of Adminstration to get ripped out like this!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (12) / No Reply - Report abuse

Barbara Saunders in San Francisco, California

72 months ago

I had corporate position that was not tremendously high paying but was on a good path. I left to pursue a dream of working in the field of animal welfare. I took a lower-level position assuming I could move back up to a "real job", even if the income potential was somewhat lower. I have found myself in a morass, where essentially EVERY position is a glorified administrative assistant role. Now, I want out but feel stumped as to how to erase the blot without going to grad school. I would never advise anyone to take a secretarial position while nearing 40! I fear for my future.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

Anonymous

71 months ago

Barbara Saunders in San Francisco, California said: I had corporate position that was not tremendously high paying but was on a good path. I left to pursue a dream of working in the field of animal welfare. I took a lower-level position assuming I could move back up to a "real job", even if the income potential was somewhat lower. I have found myself in a morass, where essentially EVERY position is a glorified administrative assistant role. Now, I want out but feel stumped as to how to erase the blot without going to grad school. I would never advise anyone to take a secretarial position while nearing 40! I fear for my future.

I made this mistake and am well over 40. It is impossible to get out of this type role and I have advanced education. Never thought this would happen. Good luck!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (6) / No Reply - Report abuse

Anonymous in East Orange, New Jersey

70 months ago

I happened to come across this site by tying in, "next step after 'Administrative Assistant'." I have been an Admin for 3 years, and am having difficulty finding a job in a higher position. Everything I find is a glorified admin position (Executive assistant, project manager, etc.). It is definitely not an easy job, when people only come to you when they need something. I wish everyone good luck in their job search!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

Karen S, in NYC (Brooklyn resident) in Brooklyn, New York

70 months ago

Hi All,

I'm a bit late on this, but wish to comment on the comment by KR above, suggesting if someone's been a legal secrertary, they should consider becomong a paralegal & then she offers a link w/ salaries.

I must refute this suggestion pls., it's both bad advice & incorrect info. (which I confirmed by looking at the offered link).

Having been a legal secty/word processor in NYC for 15+ yrs., I know first hand that Legal Secys make more money than Paras & SOMETIMES do less work. But Paras I've known work really hard (as do many Legal Sectys like I did) but get paid less, which I've told folks when they've suggested that I become a Paral; it's essentially more scut work for less money (scut work being work NO ONE wants to do).

Looking at the link suggested above, it quotes a Legal Secty as making $40K, while the Para is listed at $36K -- see my point?

While those don't appear to be NYC rates, they DO support my point.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (7) / No Reply - Report abuse

SFord in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

56 months ago

Thanks to everyone for your comments. I do have a Bachelor's Degree and am 42 years and recently lost my job of 12 years from an architect firm due to the economy. The company was forced to eliminate several positions. I took a job at a non-profit as an Executive Assistant to the Director for 3 months only to be dissappointed by the way in which the Director ran the company and so applied for an Executive Assistant/Office Manager job at a healthcare software company and found that it was not a good fit for me. I have excellent interpersonal and management skills, and am great at communicating but have finally realized that I am also tired of helping others manage their calendars, book travel, and handling others mail and phone calls. I want to retire from a company, but I desperately want to move up into a position where I make a difference and can use my admin, sales, project management, communication skills to the next level. My last position paid $40,000 and that is where I need to be to continue paying my bills, rent, etc. I too am single and do not have an income to fall back on, so choosing my passion which is my greeting card company, volunteerism, and interior design is not an option at this point.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (4) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

SFord in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

56 months ago

I have been doing some soul searching the past few months to try and reinvent my resume and career so that I am happy again going to work. I also have my certification as an Admin. Professional which is also a good way to move up in the Admin world. However, trying to get an interview these days for an Admin or other position is very tough with todays economy. I have been networking with professional peers, online job searching, and trying to look at available positions beyond that of the Admin/Exec Assistant to see where I might qualify. I apply to any and every position that seems to fit my skills and experience whether it be Project Assistant, Coordinator, Project Manager. I wish everyone luck with this and am happy that there is a group of people with the same aspirations.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

AMinSC in Rock Hill, South Carolina

35 months ago

I went from working in Sales in the temp industry into an Executive Administrative position over 18 year ago and am now working as the EA to the CEO and making more money than most of my peers. it is a tough job, a great deal of work but financially worth it. I am also the Administrative Manager and Travel Manager for the company which is world wide. I hope to one day move into a VP of Administration or Operations and eventually become a COO. I am 44 years old and love what I do. When I started, it was a job that did not follow me home at night and I did not have to worry about working weekends. That has changed, but also part of the deal working for a CEO. Moving up can be done, but you have to go after those jobs you "Think" you may not be qualified for... what is the worst that can happen? they say no... then you move on to the next big thing. ALWAYS move up! never make a sideways move....

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (6) / No Reply - Report abuse

Melanie in New Westminster, British Columbia

35 months ago

Don't get into Project Coordination or Project Development/Management! It's one in the same!!! You will always be looking after 2 or more VP's or other managers and dealing with their crap! Its BS work!!
I've been there and done it. Get out completely. Thats what I'm trying to do.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

Melanie in New Westminster, British Columbia

35 months ago

Laura in Dallas, Texas said: I am a great admin, no doubt about it. But, as with most in the profession, I am sick of it. I'm sick of being a babysitter, travel arranger, party planner, computer guru, etc. However, as someone without a college degree, I have not had enough confidence to try to make a leap in the past. I feel pigeonholed by others and myself. What is the best way forward? I currently work at a mortgage company and I have no desire to get into sales or operations, which are the only places to "go" from my position. I am fairly savvy when it comes to HR/marketing. Is my best bet finding a decent assistant position in these fields and working my way up? I am in my mid-30s now (I worked in education for most of my 20s and made the switch to an admin role about 7 years ago) and I don't want to wake up and be 40 and still doing everyone else's work for them. Anyone have any experience in this capacity?

Don't get into Project Coordination or Project Development/Management! It's one in the same!!! You will always be looking after 2 or more VP's or other managers and dealing with their crap! Its BS work!!
I've been there and done it. Get out completely. Thats what I'm trying to do.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Sexy in Long Beach, California

33 months ago

Asha in Miami, Florida said: Hey thanks for that website. I can now seek to move up and out of admin building on what i have learnt from the field.

Thanks

your not even clear like this is not helpful I want to learn info on executives not on websites:(

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Melodie Turk in Auburn, Washington

19 months ago

I have to agree with Paul. I'm an EA for an executive and I haven't blown off my old friends, but I don't shy away from executives. When I'm supporting a meeting and it includes lunch, I sit with the other executives (not my boss and not the support staff), engage them in conversation and now stop them in the hall to say a quick hello. It makes a difference. I'm still an EA and enjoy that role, but I now serve on several committees as a member and serve on two boards. My input is now valued and my salary has gone up. It takes stepping out of your comfort zone.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (10) / No Reply - Report abuse

Marie in Santa Monica, California

14 months ago

I can completely relate to what you are saying. For the last 20 years, I have worked as an Admin to an Executive Assistant to C-level executives, to an Office manager, than back to being an Exec Asst again to top ranking executives. I have found that in these roles, I can command a significantly higher salary because of my extensive experience. I make over $100k a year now, which is more than what most of my friends with fancy degrees and titles. I do have a BA degree. A minimun degree of BA is helpful but only in paper but not to do your job well. I think its a status thing for employers. they want to be able to say they employ and educated staff. However, you'll find that employers will pay more if you have a degree of a BA or higher. Most dont care what school they are from, just that you have one but I would still stay away from those online degrees. I went to a satelite business school. Having said all this and now nearing 40 years old, I'm tired of lying/exaggerating about my title or explaining that I make most than a lot of people I know. You're probably thinking, "there's no shame in what we do" but you'll have to admit, it's not a very impressive job title when you meet someone for the first time and especially if you are up in age not someone in there 20s. There's a certain stigma because its lower in the totem pole. My advice to anyone in this position is to do what it takes to move up the ladder quickly. Do not get stuck or allow someone to trap you into this role, only to wake up it the situation I'm in. (managers do not want to lose a great assistant, whether consciously or subconsciously, they want to keep you there to satisfy their own needs). Have confidence in your abilities and more importatly, take risks in going after positions outside of the Admin world. Risk-taker is a quality I lacked. I stayed within my comfort zone and now regret it. Never forget that YOU are an asset to the company! Take control of your own career path

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (10) / No Reply - Report abuse

Living and Learning in Pflugerville, Texas

13 months ago

Marie in Santa Monica, California said: My advice to anyone in this position is to do what it takes to move up the ladder quickly. Do not get stuck or allow someone to trap you into this role, only to wake up it the situation I'm in. (managers do not want to lose a great assistant , whether consciously or subconsciously, they want to keep you there to satisfy their own needs). Have confidence in your abilities and more importatly, take risks in going after positions outside of the Admin world. Risk-taker is a quality I lacked. I stayed within my comfort zone and now regret it. Never forget that YOU are an asset to the company! Take control of your own career path

Hi to All and thank you for allowing me into the conversation. I see this discussion started years ago. I would like an update on your decision. I agree with Marie in Santa Monica, California. Over 30 years ago I had a career goal of of being an Administrative Assistant. A visiting professor at the University of Texas at Austin, Texas laughed me to scorn. He said that an Admin was a low level position and not a career. He could not have been professor without an admin doing the background work. Had I keep to the career goal I would have earned more money than he. Decades later through a tough economy I am here to say that the Admins run America. Most managers will NOT let their good admins move up the ladder. The more incompetent the admin, the more likely the incompetent person will become the boss of a competent admin. I have seen this happen is huge and small companies alike. A career path for an admin is business analyst or program manager or Executive Assistant-- maybe other titles. The title depends on your industry. Your pay will depend on your industry. The real question is "In what industry do you want to be the babysitter for adults?" Your pay will depend on the industry but in all cases you will be the adult babysitter.We all need good admins. Thank you for your service.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (10) / No Reply - Report abuse

» Sign in or create an account to comment on this topic.