first day of work.. what should I do?

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Comments (7)

Orangutan in Melbourne, Australia

62 months ago

Hi everyone,

I will be starting a new job as an administrative assistant at a day center next week. The day center looks after people with disabilities.

I have never worked in a reception / an office environment before and I'm feeling very nervous right now.

I had an interview with the manager today, and got stuck on questions because I was so nervous.

However, she was so friendly and willing to give me a try.

I really want to do well and I don't want to make a fool of myself again.

So, what sort of questions should I be asking on my first day of work?

In other words, what information should I know, or have ready with me when I start work next week?

Please reply,

Thanks in advance.

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Cathy Butler in Sebastian, Florida

62 months ago

First of all ..relax! Your interviewer saw something in you they liked. If she thinks you can do the job then relax. When you don't know something (on the job), ask questions. Don't sit there and not do anything. Bosses like it when you ask questions. They want you to know how they do things. Take the inititive to do tasks, they like that to. But most of all stay calm, don't get so nervous. Be confident, bosses like that also. Good Luck. Let us know how it goes.

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Orangutan in Melbourne, Australia

62 months ago

Thanks Cathy, for your reply.

I have another question.

Suppose the client rings up and wants to speak to Lyn (your boss), but Lyn told you earlier that she doesn't want to take any calls (i.e do not disturb) . How do you handle this situation?

Me: "Sorry Mr James, Lyn is busy right now, would you like to leave a message?"

Is this script o.k?

What happens if the client insists that he wants to speak to Lyn?

Please help,

thanks in advance.

P.S does anyone here know of a good website containing phone script?

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Cathy Butler in Sebastian, Florida

62 months ago

Orangutan in Melbourne, Australia said: Thanks Cathy, for your reply.

I have another question.

Suppose the client rings up and wants to speak to Lyn (your boss), but Lyn told you earlier that she doesn't want to take any calls (i.e do not disturb) . How do you handle this situation?

Me: "Sorry Mr James, Lyn is busy right now, would you like to leave a message?"

Is this script o.k?

What happens if the client insists that he wants to speak to Lyn?

Please help,

thanks in advance.

P.S does anyone here know of a good website containing phone script?

Ask your boss if she would take a call from someone who insists on speaking with her, if not your script is excellent. Reasure the customer that she is busy and you will give her the message as soon as she is availabe. Sometimes you have to be forceful but in a professional and kind manner. Good luck. Let me know how your first day was.

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Karen S, in NYC (Brooklyn resident) in Brooklyn, New York

61 months ago

Hi Cathy,

Pls. remember several things. If I'd seen this post earlier (closer to your first day) other than suggesting you calm down (breathing deeply helps accomplish this) I'd suggest listening closely & maybe even taking some notes. Sometimes it's not about asking questions, but rather abt listening closely to what's said.

As to the callers & a script for that: this is important, while it's necessary to alway remain calm & polite, one's obligation is to the Boss FIRST, not the caller.

Don't say the Boss is busy (that's obvious).

Say something like: I'm sorry but Mr. Smith is not available. My name is Karen, I'd be happy to take your name and number (always read back the number, showing them you have it correctly, ask them to spell their name if it's not a common one or you're unsure) & importantly, make sure to get info on WHAT THEY WANT (why they're calling).

Employers don't like just a message of Jane Smith called, that's not useful, especially if they don't recognize the caller's name.
They need to know on the very first message WHAT THE CALLER WANTS. This helps them to prioritize the response (how urgent is it) & also to determine if someone else can handle it other than the Boss.

Far more useful is something like:

Jane Smith called (tel # xxx-yyyy), she needs to reschedule your apppointment with her for later this week; while I've told her I'd have to check your scheduling with you, I've suggested that alternate dates for you would likely be best on 3/24 & 3/26 as those are the only days you have any openings right now.

So if this example were true, the Boss could take the info. I gave, confirm if the dates I offered were still good & then ask me to call the caller back & reschedule the appointment based on those dates.

Initially, it may be difficult to deal w/ anxious callers, just pls. remember that it's your office, not theirs. Don't let them intimidate you, politely but firmly stand your ground.

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Connie Tshegofatso in Gaborone, Botswana

59 months ago

Always remember to get time and date even the name of a caller when taking the message.

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Karen S. in New York, New York

59 months ago

(I'm on the 3rd day of my new job).

I'd add to the prior response, pls. read back the phone number of the caller, making sure one heard the digits right & I'd ask the spelling of the caller's name if not obvious.

Importantly, I'd ask the nature of their call & if the person they're asking to speak w/ will know what it's about.

Has no one given you any work to do? Or discussed w/ you how you're expected to pass your time?

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