What are typical apartment manager salaries?

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Host

Do some companies pay a lot more for this position than others? What does a top earner make in this field?

What skills should you learn to increase your salary?

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Elena in Boise, Idaho

93 months ago

What are typical apartment manager salaries?

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Emma (Host) in Stamford, Connecticut

93 months ago

Elena said: What are typical apartment manager salaries?

Try doing a few searches using the Indeed Salary Search. It provides you with average salaries based on job titles, skills and locations. Here is one I did for Apartment Manager salaries:
]www.indeed.com/salary?q1=apartment+manager&l1=&tm=1

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Sudie in Modesto, California

83 months ago

According the the salary searches I've looked at, I am so WAY underpaid, lol!!!

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Fred in San Diego in San Diego, California

80 months ago

Sudie in Modesto, California said: According the the salary searches I've looked at, I am so WAY underpaid, lol!!!

Hello,

My first post here and I thought I'd reply to your "underpaid" comment. I see your in CA. Under CA law it is required that you are paid at least minimum wage, which currently is $7.50 per. That will be going to $8.00 per on 1/1/08. This is for 'Resident Managers'. Here is a useful website www.apartment-manager-law.com/Resident-Apartment-Manager-Law.htm

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Sudie

80 months ago

Fred in San Diego in San Diego, California said: Hello,

My first post here and I thought I'd reply to your "underpaid" comment. I see your in CA. Under CA law it is required that you are paid at least minimum wage, which currently is $7.50 per. That will be going to $8.00 per on 1/1/08. This is for 'Resident Managers'. Here is a useful website www.apartment-manager-law.com/Resident-Apartment-Manager-Law.htm

That is interesting info. On my biweekly paycheck it shows that I've worked 50 hours at 11.00 an hour. So, I now only work (have my office open) for 5 hours a day Mon-Fri. I do get a free apartment as well. It would take a lot of effort to figure out what I'm really making if I add the apartment compensation into the calculations. There is, however, all the times you have to answer the door (when at home) for tenant (so called emergencies) that never get figured in to the "time worked". It's all so random I dont think I would stress out on trying to figure it. I'm sure my company would find a way to fire me if I really started adding in all of the OVERTIME. Fighting it and going to court would be a complete pain in the neck. So,I guess I'll just be thankful for what I have. No med and dental insurance is the worst of it tho.

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Fred in San Diego, California

80 months ago

Sudie said: That is interesting info. On my biweekly paycheck it shows that I've worked 50 hours at 11.00 an hour. So, I now only work (have my office open) for 5 hours a day Mon-Fri. I do get a free apartment as well. It would take a lot of effort to figure out what I'm really making if I add the apartment compensation into the calculations. There is, however, all the times you have to answer the door (when at home) for tenant (so called emergencies) that never get figured in to the "time worked". It's all so random I dont think I would stress out on trying to figure it. I'm sure my company would find a way to fire me if I really started adding in all of the OVERTIME. Fighting it and going to court would be a complete pain in the neck. So,I guess I'll just be thankful for what I have. No med and dental insurance is the worst of it tho.

The Industrial Welfare Commission defines "hours worked" as "the time during which an employee is subject to the control of an employer, and includes all the time the employee is suffered or permitted to work." (Wage Order No. 5 2(h).)

Furthermore, California case law has held that "suffer or permit" means all work that the employer knew or should have known about; in fact, the Supreme Court even included "work such as unauthorized overtime, which the employer has not requested or required." (Morillion v. Royal Packing Co.) Be careful, however, the court will not allow a person to "work behind the back" of an apartment owner hoping to cash in later. (Id.)

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B in Spring Hill, Florida

80 months ago

I am currently a resident manager and in my first year. My current salary is $30,000.00/year with a free residence on the property. I also have my Internet, water, sewer, and basic cable included with my residence. Each December, if I have met my occupancy goals and kept the NOI within reason, I am given a $5,000.00 bonus. Hope this helps with your question. Oh, if I choose to move off site, my salary would be $41,000.00 with a $2500.00 bonus.

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Sudie

80 months ago

B in Spring Hill, Florida said: I am currently a resident manager and in my first year. My current salary is $30,000.00/year with a free residence on the property. I also have my Internet, water, sewer, and basic cable included with my residence. Each December, if I have met my occupancy goals and kept the NOI within reason, I am given a $5,000.00 bonus. Hope this helps with your question. Oh, if I choose to move off site, my salary would be $41,000.00 with a $2500.00 bonus.

WoW! That's a keeper of a job there! What management company do you work for, sounds like they really appreciate a good manager. Maybe because you are in Florida the pay is so much better? I doubt there's a CA resident mgr making that kind of dough. Good for you!

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Fred in San Diego, California

80 months ago

Sudie said: WoW! That's a keeper of a job there! What management company do you work for, sounds like they really appreciate a good manager. Maybe because you are in Florida the pay is so much better? I doubt there's a CA resident mgr making that kind of dough. Good for you!

Actually under the law I quoted above AND working as a team (husband and wife) the "minimum" wage in CA would be $53,248 per year.

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Fred in San Diego, California

80 months ago

Fred in San Diego, California said: Actually under the law I quoted above AND working as a team (husband and wife) the "minimum" wage in CA would be $53,248 per year.

I forgot to include that is 7 days a week. If you even have to be on call, say via cell phone, your on duty and thus on the clock :)

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Sudie

80 months ago

Fred in San Diego, California said: I forgot to include that is 7 days a week. If you even have to be on call, say via cell phone, your on duty and thus on the clock :)

That's good info Fred. How do you put that equation down in numbers? I'm assuming that 53k number has your housing and utilities included. When I worked our wage and added in what we COULD be paying for rent and included 80 a month for pg and e, I only come up with 42k.

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B in Spring Hill, Florida

80 months ago

My boss wouldn't be happy with me if I mentioned the management company, but yes, they do appreciate good management. The property is large though. We have over 400 units, pool, gym, tennis courts, small movie theater for guests and their dvds, detached garages, etc. So I work for my money, no doubt about that. Anyway, I lived in San Diego and the salaries you guys are mentioning, I do not know how you are even staying alive out there. I feel for ya.

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Sudie

80 months ago

Sounds like you are running a small town and you are the mayor, haha. I only have 56 units and that's plenty for us old folks.

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Kate in Phoenix, Arizona

80 months ago

I work at a property that is about 150 units and i make 40k yearly, plus per lease and per renewal commissions and quartley noi bonuses.

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Rhonda in Melbourne, Florida

79 months ago

Looking for position in Melbourne Florida or somwhwere on the coast ,anyone have leads you would like to share?
If so, snowburd1942@aol.com
Thanks all!

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desertstar55 in bermuda dunes, California

70 months ago

B in Spring Hill, Florida said: I am currently a resident manager and in my first year. My current salary is $30,000.00/year with a free residence on the property. I also have my Internet, water, sewer, and basic cable included with my residence. Each December, if I have met my occupancy goals and kept the NOI within reason, I am given a $5,000.00 bonus. Hope this helps with your question. Oh, if I choose to move off site, my salary would be $41,000.00 with a $2500.00 bonus.

good for you, i have 2 yearson my property work allthe time, i get my apartment, utilities, and $360.00 a month no medical i am just getting by and have 8 blown disc in my body, and fibromyalgia, so i guess im lucky to have this job, lol i work my but off its bs what im paid............... we all know it

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Fred in San Diego, California

70 months ago

desertstar55 in bermuda dunes, California said: good for you, i have 2 yearson my property work allthe time, i get my apartment, utilities, and $360.00 a month no medical i am just getting by and have 8 blown disc in my body, and fibromyalgia, so i guess im lucky to have this job, lol i work my but off its bs what im paid............... we all know it

desertstar, contact me. I know the law and you have money coming to you.

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jamjour kofritalo in Boca Raton, Florida

70 months ago

Host said: Do some companies pay a lot more for this position than others? What does a top earner make in this field?

What skills should you learn to increase your salary?

Not much! I knew someone who worked in this field. He made $8.00/hr. The work is not really difficult. you have to be an all around handy man. YOu have to know how to replace an electrical light bulb and or swith, how to unclog a toilet, how to seal a window frame with caulking and how to flare copper tubing for running water and brush some paint on the wall. Other than this, you don't have to be an expert at anything, just know the surface of things. When things get really involved, they owners must call the expert because he is licensed and therefore legally liable. And of course that is why he can charge thousands of dollars. I hope this helps. The one thing you have to worry about is whether or not you are going to get along with the president of the housing association. They can be reall characters. Good luck!

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Fred in San Diego, California

70 months ago

desertstar55 in bermuda dunes, California said: hi fred, what do theyowe me money on?

Hi Desertstar, under both State and Fed law they are NOT paying you properly. Most Resident Managers don't realize this and are happy with free rent and a small paycheck, that's illegal. Your in Ca., and the laws here are even MORE on your side. The law is very clear and from what you've said you have quite a bit of money coming.

Email me and I'll contact you to explain it fully. fred@nethere.com

Also for all of you others who are Managers feel free to contact me with questions regarding this issue. You probably have money coming as well.

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ManagerJon in Canoga Park, California

67 months ago

I have managed a 31 unit (all but 2 are 1 bedrooms) building for 3 1/2 years now. I live in a 3 bed, 2 bath here in Chatsworth, CA with my wife and 2 year old daughter. I receive a $389 check every 2 weeks and they charge me $600 for rent. So at the end of the month, I make $180 over my rent (which is a $2200 value, since it is a 3 bed, 2 bath). Also, they pay $30 toward my phone bill and water and trash are included. I still feel I am not making enough for all the hassle this job provides. With the economy now, we've had vacancies for 3 months and my weekends have been shot, but I get no compensation and no bonuses for extra time spent running the open houses 6 days a week or getting the vacancies filled. I'm wondering if I should start looking for a third job or ask for a raise.

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desertstar55 in bermuda dunes, California

67 months ago

the law says they can only chage you2/3 the value of the rent against being paid min wage. if you sign agreement with them.
im taking mine to court

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t

67 months ago

Never take to sawin' on the branch that's
supportin' you, unless your bein' hung from it.

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Patricparamedic in San Francisco, California

66 months ago

Sudie said: WoW! That's a keeper of a job there! What management company do you work for, sounds like they really appreciate a good manager. Maybe because you are in Florida the pay is so much better? I doubt there's a CA resident mgr making that kind of dough. Good for you!

Hi, folks:

Just for fun and balance in these conversations, let me tell you that as a Resident Manager of a large campground in northern California, I earn $40,000 per year; nearly all meals paid for at our on-site restaurant; all utilities included, as in WiFi, gas, electric, etc. I am given a fuel allowance for my vehicle; laundry, store discounts, hotel discounts, and I live at the beach. The downside? I live in my comfortable motorhome, which is fine with me, but maybe not so much for others.

I am guessing my compensation package is worth about $84,000/per year.

It did take me 20 years to find this job, but there truly are great people out here to work for. You just have to find them.

Good luck.

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CUNFUCIUS I AM in SAN FRANCISCO, California

65 months ago

Patricparamedic in San Francisco, California said: Hi, folks:

Just for fun and balance in these conversations, let me tell you that as a Resident Manager of a large campground in northern California, I earn $40,000 per year; nearly all meals paid for at our on-site restaurant; all utilities included, as in WiFi, gas, electric, etc. I am given a fuel allowance for my vehicle; laundry, store discounts, hotel discounts, and I live at the beach. The downside? I live in my comfortable motorhome, which is fine with me, but maybe not so much for others.

I am guessing my compensation package is worth about $84,000/per year.

It did take me 20 years to find this job, but there truly are great people out here to work for. You just have to find them.

Good luck.

NICE... THANKS, GIVES ME ( US ) MOTIVATION TO CONTINUE THE SEARCH FOR BETTER OPPORTUNITIES FOR ANY AND ALL OF US. NOTICED THE TREND SCALE IS DOWN FOR US. LIKE WHAT T MENTIONED ABOUT THE BRANCH WE SWING ON. SORRY TO HEAR OTHERS ARE BEING TREATED UNFAIRLY. HOPE THIS FORUM IS HELPING...

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livnlearn in Spokane, Washington

64 months ago

Host said: Do some companies pay a lot more for this position than others? What does a top earner make in this field?

What skills should you learn to increase your salary?

I am a Property Manager of a 120 unit apartment complex. I have my real estate license. Knowledge in accounting and business managment will greatly increase your salary. My current salary is $46,00 and I do not have to live on-site.

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KimG in Morris, Illinois

63 months ago

How did you find your job? Did you have any special certifications?

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T

63 months ago

KimG in Morris, Illinois said: How did you find your job? Did you have any special certifications?

I had no prior experience. Luckily another property manager spent a week with me and showed me the ropes. You need to be able to read, write, add, subtract, and communicate with people. My husband and I share a 30k a year salary, a free 3br apt with utilities paid. We arent rich but we are comfortable.
We saw the job advertised in the newspaper, we liked the town that it was located in, so we threw caution to the wind, interviewed, and got the job. Been here 3 years now with no plans of leaving.

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KimG in Morris, Illinois

63 months ago

Thank you - I've been looking, but most ads want 3-5 years experience. I think with this economy, most employers can be very picky right now.

I still think it's a good idea (comfortable would make me happy) and I'll continue my search.

Thank you for your time!

Kim

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T

63 months ago

Experience isn't EVERYTHING. If you can communicate to your prospective employer, either by resume' or in person, the things that make you qualify for the position you still have a lot of hope. Many managers that are currently looking for work may have bad histories either with tenant communications or paperwork errors. Never let a job ad intimidate you if you really want that job. All you have to do is sell yourself. In this economy being an apartment manager is a good gig, no worries about mortgage and such. I've gotten my tenants used to the fact that we do not work wknds unless it's an extreme emergency (clogged toilets or sinks are not extreme emergencies in our book).... this frees us up quite a bit. If you don't have two days to regroup it makes it very difficult to deal with tenants all week. All managers need to do this for themselves. I used to stress out thinking I needed to be available 24/7, tenants THINK you should be. It's very easy to teach them to respect your privacy, takes a few months, but my tenants "get it" now and we are just one big happy family. Wouldnt have it any other way.

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KimG in Morris, Illinois

63 months ago

You're right! I may not have apt. mgr. experienced, but lots of relevent experience. And I would LOVE to not have to worry about rent/mortgage anymore. I just sold my house because I couldn't afford the taxes anymore, and renting is ok, but free is even better!

Thank you, thank you, thank you for all your time.

I'm working on a great cover letter and getting started tonight.

Thanks again for the pep talk! I really needed it (lost my job last month and it's been scary). I'll let you know if I find something.

Kim

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sam in San Diego, California

55 months ago

I would like to work as a resident apt manager in san diego,can you tell how to started.please em-mail me thank you

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sam in San Diego, California

55 months ago

I would like to work as a resident apt manager in san diego,can you tell me how to get stated,thank you.

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Jason in Los Angeles, California

54 months ago

I accepted a resident manager position and was told the hours I am required to be on site were during the day until 5 pm an din the Summer until 6. After 6 weeks, the owner changed the hours to 9-11am then again from 2pm until 7pm Monday through Friday. Basically making it impossible for me to gain other employment. Is this fair? I already lost a job because of this sudden schedule change and now trying to find a job that will allow me to start after 7 pm is almost impossible. Can I be fired for refusing to work these new hours and demanding that I need to find an additional part time job?

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T

54 months ago

I don't know why they are telling you what hours to work. I get paid for 50 hours for a two week period.... and I choose to work the 50 hours in the best way that works for the property, the tenants and myself. Being a property manager is really a 24/7 position but if you are smart you will get things lined out so you barely "work" at all. If your units are filled and your rent is collected and you have no maintenance issues outstanding, you become very free to do other things. Why you feel you must be in touch with your bosses all the time is beyond me, they dont need to know anything except that everything is going well.

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Kate in Scottsdale, Arizona

54 months ago

I disagree completely. A busisness should have outlined hours, and just because you don't like them doesn't mean its your choice. Its your job to work the hours your boss tells you, and if you don't want to work those hours than you need a different job. And you should be in touch with your bosses frequently. You are not self employed, and your supervisor should know what is going on.

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Charlie Wade in Bay Area, California

54 months ago

Jason,

CA is an at-will state. So without a employment contract that addresses that specific issue, yes, your LL can dismiss you if you cannot/will not work those hours. Doesn't seem fair, but it is what it is...

I have to disgree with both T and Kate. Because CA is an at-will state, your boss basically has every right to require you to work specific hours or to even change those hours if desired. Does that make sense for a LL to do that to his/her resident manager? It will certainly make it more difficult to keep a good manager and you'd think that a LL would already know what he/she needs and not change a schedule that significantly. But it probably isn't illegal, it's just not very wise by the LL to do such things.

Of course your supervisor should know what's going on, as Kate says. But a LOT of apt complexes get by with no set office hours by their resident manager. I go many days without even talking with my LL, and she hasn't set foot here for months now. He trusts that I know what I'm doing... and, gosh, he hired me so he didn't have to manage things so closely or day-to-day to begin with! As long as things run smoothly and the rent gets paid/collected, he is fine with that.... like a lot of small apt complex landlords.

In many ways an apt complex is not a business vis-a-vis its manager. Lots of housekeeping laws (like IWC order 5-2001 in CA) are very specifically applicable to apt managers in a way that is very unlike a typical business or a typical employee of most businesses.

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Todd in Arlington, Texas

54 months ago

Wow. I work in the construction/developement division of a large apartment owner and I was just interested in learning what all these property managers that I deal with make.

Holy crap, I can't believe how little you guys are paid. Unreal. I thought maybe you started out at $80k for a large property or something, never dreamed a complex manager would make just above min wage.

Now I know why they are all so pissy all the time. I would be too if I knew the stupid construction guy made 5 times as much as I did.....

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gosaints43 in Santa Maria, California

53 months ago

Fred in San Diego in San Diego, California said: Hello,

My first post here and I thought I'd reply to your "underpaid" comment. I see your in CA. Under CA law it is required that you are paid at least minimum wage, which currently is $7.50 per. That will be going to $8.00 per on 1/1/08. This is for 'Resident Managers'. Here is a useful website www.apartment-manager-law.com/Resident-Apartment-Manager-Law.htm

Hi I saw these posts and know they're old but I am having a problem now that you might know something about. Would you mind contacting me?

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Fred in Homer, Alaska

53 months ago

gosaints43 in Santa Maria, California said: Hi I saw these posts and know they're old but I am having a problem now that you might know something about. Would you mind contacting me?

Hello,

I'm no longer in CA however I do now the laws. Also the link you referred to in your post is old and I found out not a reliable firm. I do know a very good attorney in CA who handles Resident Manager issues. For more info feel free to contact me at this email addy Fred@nethere.com

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Gigi in Berkeley, California

52 months ago

Hi, Can anyone clearly outline the the labor regulations for apartment managers? What is the maximum rent credit and what is the minimum salary requirements? Thank you in advance for your help.

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Charlie Wade in Bay Area, California

52 months ago

In CA, the law is very clear. In fact, Industrial Wage Commission order 5-2001 spells out very specifically what is required and allowed. The maximum rent that can be charged to a live-in manager is currently no more than $451.89 a month. If you are required to live on site, that is the maximum rent you can be charged; if you are being charged more, that is a violation of the law.

That rent can be offset by labor provided by the manager. But that wage must be at least minimum wage, which is currently at least $8.00/hr (but may be more in your locality). The manager must also voluntarily agree to such an offset and that agreement must be in writing.

Additionally, the landlord must keep detailed record of the hours worked by the manager, regardless of whether that labor is used to offset rent or is paid to the manager directly. Not keeping such records is a serious violation of labor law in any workplace.

If you need more information, google 'California Department of Industrial Relations' and 'IWC order 5-2001'.

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M in San Diego, California

51 months ago

I am a property manager in CA and today at 10:30am i was told i would no longer be working for the company and I have until tomorrow and then i will be layed off. I understand that CA is an at-will state and I can be layed off for any reason at any time, but being that I live on site can they make me leave tomorrow. I was told i must leave tomorrow. Of course i am investigating this because i dont this this is legal. Can they do this????

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m

51 months ago

No that's not true. You get 30 days. If they try and force you out call the police asap

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Charlie Wade in Bay Area, California

51 months ago

M in San Diego, California said: I am a property manager in CA and today at 10:30am i was told i would no longer be working for the company and I have until tomorrow and then i will be layed off.

Depends. Did you sign an employment contract that stated your employment and tenancy were tied together? If so, then they certainly can demand you leave at the end of your employment with them, in accordance to the contract you signed.

Absent of that, no, you are considered a typical tenant when it comes to termination of your tenancy. I'm betting that no such employment contract exists, which means good for you, bad for them. They would have to give you 30 days written notice just like any other tenant.

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S in Anchorage, Alaska

51 months ago

I manage a 110 unit apartment complex. I live off-site. With quarterly bonuses, I make $43k per year. I sacrificed pay for management experience. My last job I made about $60k per year but I really wanted to move into management but it would have taken me forever to achieve that. So, I decided to trade money for experience-right-now, which is fine with me because after I get three year of management experience, I plan to shop around--with the help of a professional recruiting agency--for other opportunities in the Apartment Industry. Oh, let me add that I am working on my MBA, which will help to increase my income. To work as a manager and have a base salary from $70k - $85k will work for a while. So now you know.

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Former On Site Manager in Canby, Oregon

51 months ago

Being an on site manager right now is actually one of the worse times due to the economy. Not only are you dealing with pressures to fill vacancies because all of your prospects aren't qualified due to low income, but this economy is driving the sale and purchase of a lot a complexes. The sale of a complex is almost always bad for the on-site manager. Because usually when a complex sells the new owner uses the management company that they are already using for other properties and usually that's not the one your working for. Often the new management company will keep the old resident manager for a few weeks as they take over the property then they will lay you off and hire someone fresh. There are lots of reasons for this, its just how it is. When you get laid off or fired as a on-site apartment manager you lose your apartment almost immediately because part of your compensation is your rent. They call it a rent credit, or additional compensation, but unlike tenants on-site managers don't have a rental agreement. Without a rental agreement they can legally require you to move out with a minimum 72 hour notice. From reading previous post you can tell that most on-site managers make minimum wage on average for working 40hrs a week and are on call 24/7. If you consider the on call time that you actually deal with tenants and your normal office hours you end up making less then minimum wage. So if you barely make enough money to survive and then you get laid off and lose your apartment, good luck finding a new apartment when you don't have a job and likely very little savings due to your previous job that was barely minimum wage. By the way unemployment doesn't count your rent credit as part of your wage only what you actually received that could be put into a bank. When they require you to live on site your apartment should not be considered as additional compensation since they require it. That would be like calling the pen in your office "additional compensation".

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Charlie Wade in Bay Area, California

51 months ago

Former On Site Manager in Canby, Oregon said: Without a rental agreement they can legally require you to move out with a minimum 72 hour notice.

That's simply not true. If there is no written, legally-enforceable rental agreement or lease, then you are considered a tenant just like any other.

With having tenant rights like any other, you are also entitled to 30 days written notice when the landlord demands you vacate.

This is a situation that a lot of LLs blow it: they think that being a manager automatically allows the manager's tenancy and their job to be tied together. That simply isn't true. In lieu of a written agreement, the two are separate. So the manager's job status does not affect the manager's tenancy and the manager has typical tenant rights, just like his/her tenants in his/her complex.

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Former On Site Manager in Canby, Oregon

51 months ago

Wish that would have been the case but unfortunately that is not what my employment contract said. The employment contract specifically said that upon termination of employment I was to vacate the provided apartment within 72 hours. My apartment was actually connected to part of the office. In addition I was silly enough to sign the contract when I got the job. Now if it had been true that I would have 30 days, it would have been better, but I would still have had a very difficult time finding a new apartment with no income and very little savings due to the poor payment. Fortunately I knew it was coming for months and found employment elsewhere before hand. In addition the management company is not the LL's friend because they kept telling me that they highly doubted the place would sell, even after they knew it had been approved by the bank, which is a lengthy process itself. They just didn't think I knew that, but one of the buyers newer and inexperienced employees always spilled the beans on everything. They didn't want me to think it would sell because they didn't want me to leave before hand as they needed me there. My conclusion after talking with lots of other managers in the area is that is exactly what happens and has happened to them. Don't let the carrot of a "free" apartment lure you in. Your working for that apartment and your available there 24/7 for whatever the boss wants, that is not what I would call free. Long story short I have worked lots of different jobs and I would rather do any of them instead. They don't pay LL's for what they are worth for their skills nor for their time. Why do you think there is such high turn over for LL's and only certain types of people make it long term. Long term is 10+ years. Most that I met get frustrated with the low pay and high responsibilities and realize they would be happier making more money with less responsibility doing something else.

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Gigi in Oakland, California

51 months ago

Can anyone recommend a lawyer in the San Francisco Bay are who specializes in employment law.
Here is a blog I found that really explained Apartment Manager's rights. I think it is a little outdated and the minimum wage is incorrect but the information is helpful. app-miteshrami-1.aidpage.com/

Thank you in advance for your help.

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