Are cad operator job opportunities growing or declining?

Comments (8)

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Are jobs in this industry on the rise? Are there any sub-sectors that are growing?

Where are the jobs? Which places have the most cad operator opportunities?

the_lost_art in Brewster, New York

66 months ago

Operative word being CAD "operator". If you are a CAD Operator than your job prospects will be limited. Train/retrain yourself in drafting (Mechanical, Electrical, Architectural or Civil) than your job prospects will increase. Civil and Architectural jobs are tight right now, but electrical remains pretty good in Silicon Valley types of areas.

Knowing CAD programs does not make you a drafter/designer any more than knowing Photoshop makes you an artist. You have have to learn the lost art of drafting.

Good luck in your search.

n.galdo in Davao, Philippines

42 months ago

Architect needs engineer and engineers need architect...i think both of them are interconnected to one another...lets make an example,Architect may wish to design 50 storey bldg,,yes architect can desind but doent mean that he include the structural design,,architect are not allowed to design the structural of high rise bldg ,it is very complicated and needs lots of computation and testing before they reniunch it as approved design,,on architecture they always base on standard require for structural design taht allows only for 3 -5 stry bldg...architect design the appearance design exterior and interior including,color,decoration,king of materials,lighting,...but if an architect wish to design a 50 story bldg it cannot stand without structural engineer,,,structural engineer is like a bone of the body of human without bone haman cannot stand..its simple,..architect limited only on Vertical structure like houses where as Engineer are usefull in designing,bridge,roads,bldg,raiway,apron and simple houses...on the other hand if engineer design A 50 STOry bldg,he need an architect to give a good perpective on his design.

MCM in Scranton, Pennsylvania

4 months ago

You are completely wrong. Being a CAD "Operator", "Designer" whatever you want to call the former profession is GONE. It is taught in engineering, architectural and interior design school. Those students are coming out with all of the skills.

If you are thinking of going to technical school to get certified as a CAD or REVIT technician, just take the money you were going to spend and burn it. You will not find a job. Not when qualified students coming out of school, mostly with their Master's Degrees anymore, are applying for the same job you intend to. You will not even be looked at. They have much more knowledge and understanding of the profession, even if they start at the bottom as a draftsperson.

Myrdoc in Salt Lake City, Utah

4 months ago

MCM in Scranton, Pennsylvania said: You are completely wrong. Being a CAD "Operator", "Designer" whatever you want to call the former profession is GONE. It is taught in engineering, architectural and interior design school. Those students are coming out with all of the skills.

Yeah but engineers suck at drawings, I've been working with Engineers in different fields for 10 years and they do not make good drawings. Sure they can do a 3D component in Solidworks, but they're lost when it comes to making a clean shop drawing with GD&T. That's why there will ALWAYS be a need for a drawing professional, call them what you want (drafters, designers etc), but until drawings go away completely, they will always be around.

trebby in North Hollywood, California

4 months ago

me, 20 years working experience with the engineers, I do calculations too and submit drawings to the city, I like cad drawings and I like my job, i'm already in the profit sharing of the company, bec. of my contributions to perform cad drawings.

Derp in Baltimore, Maryland

4 months ago

MCM in Scranton, Pennsylvania said: You are completely wrong. (blah blah blah, etc)

Well, my my. Quite an obstensibly authorative assessment. But consider the mentality of a hiring manager seeking to fill a mere CAD tech opening, which level of education is going to bring with it higher salary requirements - Master or Associate? The defense rests.

Manny in Evansville, Indiana

2 months ago

MCM in Scranton, Pennsylvania said: You are completely wrong. Being a CAD "Operator", " Designer " whatever you want to call the former profession is GONE. It is taught in engineering , architectural and interior design school. Those students are coming out with all of the skills.

If you are thinking of going to technical school to get certified as a CAD or REVIT technician, just take the money you were going to spend and burn it. You will not find a job. Not when qualified students coming out of school, mostly with their Master's Degrees anymore, are applying for the same job you intend to. You will not even be looked at. They have much more knowledge and understanding of the profession, even if they start at the bottom as a draftsperson.

Not necessarily. I am a senior in high school. I hold an internship with a residential drafting company where many of the workers are college educated with many degrees. I may not have a "full time" status, but if you take the time to learn procedures and do quality work, it really doesn't matter what your degree is. A degree is something anyone who wants to, can indeed get. Getting certified in a CAD program is very useful, but my internship had allowed me to develope some further skills with the software and now when I do go to college and get my certification, I will be more than qualified. I have the training, degree, certification, experience, and employers will be able to notice I am indeed a quality worker. Learning the program takes time. To master it requires further knowledge (I recomend key commands). But most importantly, learn the components of a residential building before you apply. It doesn't matter how good you are at designing with CAD if you don't even know how to visually see the design. Another side note, take some time to learn other software programs and advance in them. It's also all about knowing people. Prove yourself as a person, a worker, then build up a really strong resume.

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