Pushed into a one-month trial contract for what was listed as a full time position. What gives?

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SIGH in Chapel Hill, North Carolina

21 months ago

Hello All: I recently got offered (ish) a job at a non-profit for a communications director position. However, rather than start me off as a full-time hire (as announced on their job advertisement), they want to "test me out" for a month as a contract hire to see if "I'm what they want" and so that I can see if they're what I want.

I'm more than a little upset. Clearly, I did my research, pitched projects, and so on. When the ED called me up, they said that I was the top candidate out of a pool of 150 applicants so I obviously have skills they need. I'm not sure what to make of this other than to say yes and wait out the month. Meanwhile, I'd be passing out other opportunities (I am still interviewing. 4 this week in DC).

I would like thoughts on the issue on whether I should ask that my position will be guaranteed pending my performance in writing and what my full-time salary and benefits will be. Apparently, there was some cancellation of health benefits the last few months. I don't know if this means that they're looking into getting a new health plan or if they're just forgoing health coverage all together.

Does any of this sound like a deal breaker? raise red flags? Since there are so many people vying for one job, is this test-run period something non-profits do these days?If I had a solid offer elsewhere in the state I'm currently living in, I think I would say no to this organization. Mostly because I feel *more than* a little slighted. Is that petty? Work is work, loans need to be paid off, I can't afford to move, my spouse is already employed here, etc. I'm already doing contract work for a local, medical non-profit and volunteering. While I enjoy this work, and it pays well, it is temporary with no outlook on a permanent position. It's frustrating. I feel like I'm stuck in an extended interview phase :(

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

21 months ago

With few exceptions, employment is never guaranteed. Employment is almost always ar-will, meaning employer can terminate employee at any time, without notice and for no reason. (Vice versa for employees; they can leave an employer at any time, without notice and for no reason.) For you, that means IMO any guarantees you may receive won't be worth a quarter.

As far as full-time goes, don't try to argue bait-and-switch. You don't have to take the job. Because of the apparent bait-and-switch, I wouldn't feel I could trust these people. I wouldn't buy their story about being the top candidate out of 150. If I were truly that person, why am I not being hired full time right off the bat.

Keep looking. Good luck with your job search. Don't let yourself be duped.

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jasperthompson in Chicago, Illinois

7 months ago

SIGH in Chapel Hill, North Carolina said: Hello All: I recently got offered (ish) a job at a non-profit for a communications director position. However, rather than start me off as a full-time hire (as announced on their job advertisement), they want to "test me out" for a month as a contract hire to see if "I'm what they want" and so that I can see if they're what I want.

I'm more than a little upset. Clearly, I did my research, pitched projects, and so on. When the ED called me up, they said that I was the top candidate out of a pool of 150 applicants so I obviously have skills they need. I'm not sure what to make of this other than to say yes and wait out the month. Meanwhile, I'd be passing out other opportunities (I am still interviewing. 4 this week in DC).

I would like thoughts on the issue on whether I should ask that my position will be guaranteed pending my performance in writing and what my full-time salary and benefits will be. Apparently, there was some cancellation of health benefits the last few months. I don't know if this means that they're looking into getting a new health plan or if they're just forgoing health coverage all together.

Does any of this sound like a deal breaker? raise red flags? Since there are so many people vying for one job, is this test-run period something non-profits do these days?If I had a solid offer elsewhere in the state I'm currently living in, I think I would say no to this organization. Mostly because I feel *more than* a little slighted. Is that petty? Work is work, loans need to be paid off, I can't afford to move, my spouse is already employed here, etc. I'm already doing contract work for a local, medical non-profit and volunteering. While I enjoy this work, and it pays well, it is temporary with no outlook on a permanent position. It's frustrating. I feel like I'm stuck in an extended interview phase :(


Do you feel that online work is just as difficult as on-site?
Jasper Thompson

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