Should I get my BSEE?

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Matthew Speed in Dacula, Georgia

90 months ago

In another lifetime (1989) I was granted a scholarship to study EE at UT-Austin. Due to various life events, most significantly including fracturing my skull in a motorcycle accident, I did not finish my EE degree. In the years since that point I have become a software developer (teaching myself database development, VB, some Perl, some C and some UN*X scripting along the way) but it has always nagged me that I did not get the EE degree.

In terms of income, I don't make a lot more than than a starting EE does now (mainly because I don't have a CS or EE degree) so I am wondering, if I were to go back and finish my EE (probably not at Texas, though) will I come out being viewed as a fresh graduate or will my decade of experience doing software project development have a significant impact on job prospects?

I completed all my math & sciences so all I really need is the EE courses themselves, and even though my prior knowledge is a little stale, the fact that I have kept my mind in the structured world of code means I shouldn't have to do that much to get back in the groove. I am figuring I can knock this out in 2-3 years and I really don't see the need for EE's diminishing anytime soon.

Note: this was brought on by a visit to a friend of mine who is an EE in Dallas. Even though he too spends most of his time writing C++ and Perl, there is no way I could get into the kind of position he has without an EE. I'm stuck writing software for businesses and he is writing code for a major electronics mfr making about twice what I do.

Candid opinions would be greatly appreciated.

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gary in Winston Salem, North Carolina

84 months ago

If you want to continue working in programming languages, a CS degree will probably suit you better. However, first I'd do some research on companies whom I might like to work for (located where I'd like to live). I'd look at job requirements listed in posted job advertisements, and I'd ask people at these companies (HR, technical managers, others I could find). That should help you decide which degree (if any) would benefit you the most.

The need for EE's is usually very specialized. Sure there are lots of job advertisements, but when you read the qualifications you find quite specific experience that companies require. Once you sort out the ads that you truly meet the requirements for you'll find just a small number of opportunities. The EE market has many niches and it's very hard to jump from niche to niche. That’s why I suggest focusing on jobs that match your accumulated experience. A general EE degree may not help you as much as a more focused CS degree could. Hopefully your past college credits will apply to whichever degree you decide is best.

I’d expect that after you graduate, your decade of software projects will not only be valued but will probably be an advantage. If asked, I’d tell potential employers that I went back to school to validate my experience and round out my knowledge base. Employers should value individuals who keep current and / or expand their skills, and getting a college degree is an excellent way to show that you don’t stay in one place (slowly eroding away). Yes you would be a recent graduate, but will have the latest knowledge plus ten years of applicable project experience to boot.

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Jake_EE in Ohio

83 months ago

I'm an unemployed EE and can not find work. I would only go into EE work if you are 99.99% sure you have a job opportunity when you graduate, ie. already know someone that will hire you.

Like the previous poster wrote, EE positions require so much specialized experience it seems next to impossible to get an itnerview let alone a job in this field.

As for me, I'm changing careers.

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Matthew Speed in Buford, Georgia

83 months ago

Shortly after posting my original question a phone call came out of the blue from a recruiter with whom I had never spoken and I ended up being hired by a Civil Engineering firm. While I am pretty sure I won't be going back to complete an EE now, I do greatly appreciate the feedback I have been given. I wish all of you luck in your futures. This is the 6th job I have had since 2000 (each change precipitated by higher level decisions over which I had no control or impact) so my fingers are crossed for all of us.

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admjwarren@yahoo.com in Odenton, Maryland

74 months ago

Your Job prospects in Programing or IT are much better.

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Dee Love in chicago, Illinois

74 months ago

I THANK YOU FOR YOUR QUESTION.Iknow now that I have to find a niche and I think I have several of intrest.Being a commercial electrician I've dealt with a lot of different applicationS in which I've had to review blueprints and install and in some cases modify to fit "A REAL WORLD DESIGN",so I'm pretty comfortable with several avenue's in which to explore.My question to you is, do you know of anyone goes to school for electrical engineering design or is that still very general?

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Kerry

65 months ago

Most of my expeience is in aviation I really don't know which way to turn either. There are lots of jobs for EE's.I'm going to start school for my BSEE. I'm going to Devry and get the BSEE in threee years.Getting junk classes out of the way.Stay with the EE and get to work. Have you thought about teaching.Don't give up put the educatuon to good work.

Jake_EE in Ohio said: I'm an unemployed EE and can not find work. I would only go into EE work if you are 99.99% sure you have a job opportunity when you graduate, ie. already know someone that will hire you.

Like the previous poster wrote, EE positions require so much specialized experience it seems next to impossible to get an itnerview let alone a job in this field.

As for me, I'm changing careers.

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The_Gooch in Deerfield Beach, Florida

61 months ago

Kerry said: Most of my expeience is in aviation I really don't know which way to turn either. There are lots of jobs for EE's.I'm going to start school for my BSEE. I'm going to Devry and get the BSEE in threee years.Getting junk classes out of the way.Stay with the EE and get to work. Have you thought about teaching.Don't give up put the educatuon to good work.

Devry?? Better check that school as I am pretty sure they ARE NOT ABET accredited. Do not waste your time with a non-ABET school. Suck it up and get a real BSEE not some cracker jack diploma online.

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Matt in Cleveland, Ohio

59 months ago

The_Gooch in Deerfield Beach, Florida said: Devry?? Better check that school as I am pretty sure they ARE NOT ABET accredited. Do not waste your time with a non-ABET school. Suck it up and get a real BSEE not some cracker jack diploma online.

Absolutely agree with you, The_Gooch! Only do an EE program that is ABET accredited. You have to put all those years of work in anyway, you might as well get the real deal, so that if you did want to be licensed as a Professional Engineer later on you can be. Devry is not accredited!

Check the ABET website for accredited programs. www.abet.org

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Steve in Berkeley, California

54 months ago

Devry only offers BSEET and it is only good if you like being a technician.

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Juan in Elmhurst, Illinois

53 months ago

The_Gooch in Deerfield Beach, Florida said: Devry?? Better check that school as I am pretty sure they ARE NOT ABET accredited. Do not waste your time with a non-ABET school. Suck it up and get a real BSEE not some cracker jack diploma online.

Ummm.... I think you should double check ww.abet.org before posting.

Devry University does hold ABET accreditation for its BSEET program. DeVry University is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association (NCA), www.ncahlc.org.
DeVry University is also a member of CHEA, a national advocate and institutional voice for self-regulation of academic quality through accreditation.

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Engineer08 in Richmond, Virginia

53 months ago

All I got to say, watch frontline (pbs) on this issue, please watch it.

General rule thumb is that profit motivated schools like Avary, DeVry, Phoenix University are not perceive as legit school in most employers view even though they might be accredited. In addition to that the tuition cost is typically 3 or 4 more expensive than public university. So when student finishes his or her undergraduate degree, they typically owes +$100k. Of course this also might be hold true in well known university (Harvard, Standford, MIT, etc..) but there is no comparison between Harvard and DeVry

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Juan in Elmhurst, Illinois

52 months ago

Sounds to me like most of you displaying negativity towards the BSEET graduates do not appreciate your fellow coworkers. No one is stating a BSEET is equal to a BSEE. I simply stated that the BSEET program at Devry U is accredited. BSEET graduates may be "monkey technologist" for some of you, for you to refer to BSEET graduates as "monkeys" is simply proof of your bitterness. I assure you, if you are not mature enough to understand and appreciate the differences, you are no engineer in the eyes of a CEO. You are probably a BSEE graduate that got fired because you could not deliver. You were probably replaced by a BSEET graduate because he/she got it done both in theory and practical in less time with a very cost effective method. The company I work for has an entire engineering group focused on advanced development and is led by a BSEET graduate from Devry U. In fact, 80% of the engineers in this group are BSEET graduates. The remaining 20% is made of BSEE and BSECET graduates. By the way, the company is number 1 in the access control market worldwide thanks to the innovation of this engineering group. I am very fortunate to have the opportunity of earning my BSEET degree and am very proud of it. I may not make as much money as some of you BSEE graduates but I do live a comfortable lifestyle earning $75k a year. By the way, did I mention I replaced two BSEE graduates? Maybe the company did save money by hiring me instead of paying both BSEE graduates $90k+, but my success is measured on what I can do, not entirely on how much money I make. What... you think a company is going to pay a BSEE graduate $90k+ a year when a BSEET graduate can deliver the same end result? In fact, most companies accept the BSEET degree in the field of Electrical, Electronic, Test, Manufacturing, and QA Engineering.

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Juan in Elmhurst, Illinois

52 months ago

Let me be clear, I respect BSEE graduates and know that a BSEE will be more knowledgeable in theory. However, I also feel a BSEET grad can continue his or her education independantly and accomplish just as much, if not more, than a BSEE graduate.

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RRichie09 in Diamond Bar, California

52 months ago

Juan in Elmhurst, Illinois said:
1* I simply stated that the BSEET program at Devry U is accredited.

2* BSEET graduates may be "monkey technologist" for some of you

3* In fact, 80% of the engineers in this group are BSEET graduates.
/QUOTE]

1* Everyones response is based on Kerry's post that Devry offers an accredited BSEE degree, not on any of your statements.

2* That comment was really uncalled for and I am sure that person would never dare say that in front of your face. The internet is full of armchair tough guys. Having said that, I am curious, why did you choose to pursue a BSEET when a BSEE would have been cheaper and only have taken a year longer?

3* I was under the impression that only persons possesing a PE license is considered an engineering? With a BSEET don't you need atleast 10 years of experience before being allowed to take the PE? I am only a college student and not very clear on the terminology and process of obtaining a PE license.

Juan in Elmhurst, Illinois said: a BSEET grad can continue his or her education independantly and accomplish just as much, if not more, than a BSEE graduate.

This is true, but generally not the rule. Someone who never went to college can also do everything you just said but its not very likely and why not start your career from the highest point possible?

I do not mean any disrespect by my posts. I am just very interested in your choice to pursue a BSEET. I have a friend who is considering going to a school like Devry and I have been trying to talk him out of it, but to be honest I do not know very much about schools like Devry. I am purely basing my opinions on popular opinion and as we all know that is never a good idea.

So, why is it that you choose to attend Devry instead of a 4-year university?

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Juan in Elmhurst, Illinois

52 months ago

No problem, I only stated facts as well and do not really care what people think the degree I have.

Bottom line, Devry U has a purpose. It is to attract young adults to their education institution who do not have the means or time to attend a traditional college. It would be a much better decision to go to a traditional college, but we do not live in an ideal world. People have to work, support their families, pay for school, and make time for the family. These types of individuals are the target students for Devry U.

Now, just because you meet the criteria stated above, it does not mean Devry U is for you. You have to be dedicated to your studies and a very good self starter. All classes require a lot of reading and a lot of assignments. You have to be ready to study when enrolled to an online program. In fact, chances are 6 out of 10 students will not make in the first semester.

One reason for attending Devry U is flexibility. I am single father with a full-time job and a mortgage. In addition, I already had my ASCET from ITT which was a waste of money. The education was very good but credits were not transferable. Also, keep in mind I took transfer courses at a local community college to offset the cost.

Secondly, I really enjoy working with products I am involved with during development. I have the flexibility of understanding the theory behind the product and the ability to explain the products practical functionality to a technical audience. I guess you can say I like being the middle man between engineering and manufacturing.

As a BSEET graduate, I focus on developing and integrating different products and systems. This includes test engineering, systems integration, and sustaining engineering. The education received at Devry U is well rounded for this type of job.

I would recommend Devry U for young self motivated adults with very busy schedules to further their education, not to a fresh high school graduate.

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Dom in Elmwood Park, Illinois

52 months ago

Juan, is your company hiring? I'm recently laid off and looking for a new position and I have a BSEET as well. Any help is much appreciated.

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Juan in Elmhurst, Illinois

52 months ago

Actually, No. The company just let go of 15 engineers and there are no plans to replace them. Business has really slowed down these last couple of years.

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Entry Level Engineer in La Crosse, Wisconsin

52 months ago

This discussion about BSEE and BSEET is very interesting. I personally graduated from DeVry University with my BSCET degree. After graduation, I decided to take a position as a Software Engineer as my hardware background was fairly weak. Being in the field, I realized that there were some very important concepts that DeVry did a poor job covering. I also realized that there were some concepts that DeVry did a great job in covering. Working with other engineers, I noticed that this does not put me behind any of the other engineers. I actually worked very hard and am actually the top engineer on my team. It is surprising to me as I am not a regular state graduate. This made me realized that companies should pick their engineers on their actual background and not where they got their degree from. Well, we all know that in the long run, experience overcomes education.

Realizing the above, I went ahead and reanalyzed my undergraduate degree. What I did realize is that an EET/CET, whether obtained from a state university or a private university, is more focused on hands on applications and does not cover enough engineering fundamentals as done by a regular EE and CE. Therefore, an EET/CET comes out of college prepared to actually put things together, and use the current tools in the industry to their advantage. On the other hand, an EE/CE will come out of college and require some training before they are ready to start. However, since an EE/CE has more knowledge in engineering fundamentals, the EE/CE will be able to design better systems with less guidance than an EET/CET.
Every school is kind of different, but our degrees are similar in ways. If I can do my undergraduate again, I would definitely go with an EE/CE as they are the basic fundamentals of everything, and you can learn the technology part once you are in the field. That is just my two cents on the subject. Good luck to you all.

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Thorneko in Sullivan, Missouri

52 months ago

BSEE degree? You'd be better off getting a CS degree, since most of the work today in electrical/electronics engineering requires a lot of programming. If you want into the semiconductor field and insist on a BSEE degree, you must absolutely know C++ and verilog (especially systemverilog). You know this and you can most likely always get work.

My background so I can at least establish some credibility.
14 years - Sun Microsystems (product/test/verification engineer)
4 years - Intergraph Advanced Processor Division (1st job in the field)
8 years - US NAVY - nuclear reactor operator/electronics technician

So to give you an idea of the job market out there:
After getting laid off from SUN Microsystems in the fall of 2008, jobs for EE's dried up completely. I eventually took a "network center technician position with AT&T which turned out to be a call center position. After hiring 90+ people for this work, AT&T let us all go after a year as they outsourced the positions overseas.

After 3 months I have found a new position as a "senior electronics technician" working at a nearby university at their nuclear research reactor facility. Any guesses why I got the job over the other 5 applicants that applied? (See work history above)

The job market is very ugly out there for EE's at the moment.
I knew many great engineers at SUN, and we keep in touch on how the job market is looking. A friend of mine finally found employment after 13 months. Some are still looking for EE work after 18 months or more, many have gone back to school to switch careers.

Here's the other problem: Outsourcing...US electronics manufacturing is getting scarcer by the day. Google Foxconn if you want to know where the jobs went. When the manufacturing went, the product and test engineering jobs went as well. SO having said all that, EE work in the semiconductor field today is boiling down to a smaller number of US semi fabs, semi design and semi verification.

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MrX in Carriere, Mississippi

52 months ago

I'm finishing up my Associates in Automation and Control Technology and I was thinking about going to school to get my B.S.E.T from a traditional 4 year college. I'm leaning towards the University of Houston they have an Control and Instrumentation Electronics program. But it seems I'm seeing a little negativity here on the boards so I'm wondering how BSEE's view the BSET's? And what the major differences between the two careers.

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Entry Level Engineer in La Crosse, Wisconsin

52 months ago

MrX in Carriere,

Being in the aerospace industry, I would say you would benefit the most by going for a BSCE. The reason is because a BSCE deals with both software and hardware. This way, you can take the hardware or software path if you would like. You can easily move into a MSEE later on if you would like. At the same time, you know the software to become a Software Engineer in the field. Don't get me wrong, most software engineering jobs are being outsourced too. But, if you can get into the defense industry, you will be good for a while. The defense industry cannot be outsourced, but the government will cut back the defense budget from time to time.

Even with the budget cutback, I still see a good amount of software engineering positions open. Competition is tough, but if you work hard and know your stuff, you will be fine. If I personally were to go back to college, I would definitely choose the BSCE degree. Also, a technology degree means you will have to take extra classes later on in order to bridge to the Master's program. I'm currently pursuing my Master, and I had to take extra classes to bridge. In other words, a technology degree means you want to just work and stay in the field; whereas, an engineering degree means you want to pursue higher education later on. Therefore, BSCE is probably your best choice.

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sjwills in Satellite Provider

51 months ago

Hey, everyone. I'm in school for my ASEET to get my feet wet, but I really want to go get my BSEE afterwards despite the fact that I will just about have to start over. I have one dilemma. I am a husband of two children and I, of course, work full time. Has anyone ever been in this scenario? Do any of you EE's out there think it is possible to do with so much on my plate already? I just know that there is a lot of school work. Classes are only in the daytime as well, so I'll have to figure out how to do it while working day shifts, i'm sure....

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fmath600@yahoo.com in Arlington, Texas

51 months ago

I got the Bseet degree and had a job until 2007. I was a test engineer. Is there any jobs in texas or usa? It has been hard and only some places are hiring electrical engineers and not much else.

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Tiny Tim in Somerset, Kentucky

51 months ago

The_Gooch in Deerfield Beach, Florida said: Devry?? Better check that school as I am pretty sure they ARE NOT ABET accredited. Do not waste your time with a non-ABET school. Suck it up and get a real BSEE not some cracker jack diploma online.

Just as a note, Devry, online is accredited through the TAC of ABET, which is the Technology Accredidation Commision of the Accredidation Board of Engineering and Technology, although there are a few excluded campuses, such as Calagary. Not that I am a big fan of online grads, those who I have hired with this training, have been good assets to my company. With that said, I would also recommend that you fully research the degree program that you wish to attend.

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Entry Level Engineer in La Crosse, Wisconsin

50 months ago

Josh,

You are correct as some state will allow you to get a PE with a BSEET. Most employers do not even know what the difference between an EE and EET is, so most don't even care as long as you know your stuff. The following link is the best explanation I have found about the difference between EET and EE:

www.tech.purdue.edu/ecet/aboutus/about.cfm#ECETvsECE

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Randomcat in Seattle, Washington

50 months ago

Just wanted to make two points: community colleges often have evening programs that are not available at larger universities, the tuition is often much less expensive, and they usually have credit transferability agreements with nearby universities. So if you have a good CC nearby, check out what transfer programs they have available. Second, the reason to avoid online programs has nothing to do with the actual education you get, and everything to do with the perception of the education you get. If the average hiring manager thinks of Devry as a diploma mill, then it doesn't matter whether you're really a better engineer than the next guy with a BSEE. You won't be given the opportunity to show your superior skills.

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Entry Level Engineer in La Crosse, Wisconsin

50 months ago

Randomcat,

You are right that if a hiring manager thinks DeVry is a diploma mill, then it doesn't matter how smart a person is, he or she most likely not get the same opportunity as compared to a traditional state graduate. Personally, everybody thinks DeVry is an online school. All my coworkers tell me the same thing, but DeVry is different on a per campus basis.
Being a state graduate student now, I have bridged the difference and can honestly say that state university is better for engineering. DeVry is good for field service engineering work, but state university is much better at design. Also, this might be a by campus thing, but I felt DeVry had a weak grip over software. My professors gave me a good start, but the upper level software were very weak. I was able to learn it on my own time, which a student must be able to especially at a graduate level. Anyway, from my interviewing experiences, I was able to pass the screening just fine. However, companies will definitely try to shoot you down if you are a DeVry grad. Also, like most people, I don't remember everything I have learned through school, so I did had a tough time on some things.

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cp in Phoenix, Arizona

48 months ago

hi!
i have BSEE degree but my all experience with engineering technician jobs.
i want to get entry level electrical engineering job in arizona,
please reply me ! if somebody can help me to find right thing.

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Brett in Corpus Christi, Texas

38 months ago

RRichie09 in Diamond Bar, California said: And I think you should re-read The_Gooch's post before posting. He said Devry is not accredited for a BSEE. There is a HUGE difference between a BSEE and a BSEET.

One you can become an actual engineer and the other you can only become a technician

This is so not true. I hold a BSEET degree and have one year until I sit for my PE exam. Check the state board rules.

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Joe in Cincinnati, Ohio

37 months ago

Thanks for all the input on this subject. I have been considering going back to school for either a BSEE or a BSEET. I am a journeyman lineman and thought the next logical progression would to be a move from field operations to engineering or management. Does anybody have an opinion on the civil engineering side of the equation? It looks like I can get an MSEE in transmission and distribution from gonzaga online after attaining any reputable and accredited engineering degree.

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BSEET grad

37 months ago

Most of you guys are wrong and ignorant of the fact that BSEET and BSMET graduates are actually getting real engineering jobs in highly reputable companies like the automotive companies here in Michigan. Working as design engineers, test engineers, field engineers etc, right out of college. One of the top of engineering directors at GM is a BSMET graduate from a ABET university and many of our very best engineers are actually BSEET and BSMET graduates from top universities. The world has and changed companies are finding that BSET graduates like BSEE and BSME graduates have very useful approaches to engineering problems. Successful companies are focused on results not titles.

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Josh in Canandaigua, New York

36 months ago

Jake_EE in Ohio said: I'm an unemployed EE and can not find work. I would only go into EE work if you are 99.99% sure you have a job opportunity when you graduate, ie. already know someone that will hire you.

Like the previous poster wrote, EE positions require so much specialized experience it seems next to impossible to get an itnerview let alone a job in this field.

As for me, I'm changing careers.

Don't take this the wrong way, but if you can't find a job in EE, the problem isn't EE, it's you. There are so many jobs out there for all engineering disciplines it's ridiculous. Sure job hunts can be tough fresh out of school, but if someone simply cannot find anything after a significant and exhaustive search then it comes down to:

1. The search really wasn't exhaustive enough
2. They live in a nowhere town with 2 companies and are unwilling to move
3. They aren't aggressive enough in the job search
4. They aren't making an attempt to learn the specific things employers want
5. They have a track record of crap performance

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JJW in Cadillac, Michigan

35 months ago

14 years as EE. The best I like about it,
I can invent my own products. Working with other disgruntled firmware/software engineers, we have made our own products and are now all relatively well-off. don't expect much future working for a company for a long time. The only way I would get raises was to apply for new jobs and inflate my current salary.

A software engineer can't do anything without hardware. An EE like me can learn firmware pretty easily. I have seen many a software engineer struggle.
I worked next to one for a few years and after his 'programmer' quit working, he was stuck. I let him flounder for a few days than said, give me your connector. A few solder touch-ups and his programmer was working again. Sure was funny to watch this guy struggle after he thought he could do anything. I had to teach this guy how to use an oscilloscope to probe his I/Os for effective debugging.

A CE major can only use a keyboard, nothing else.
As a EE, I had courses in everything from quantum physics to microwave circuits.

Working for a company, you will find that accountants go to the top of the corporate ladder. Engineers get offices by the back door bathroom. That wasn't how it was back when my father was an electical engineer, but it is now.

The best thing about being a EE, I can do anything electric/electronic.

The best advice, BE A DOCTOR !!!

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Trevor in Austin, Texas

35 months ago

Anyone that gets accepted to UT Austin EE would be a fool not to take advantage of it. It is one of the top rated EE schools in the country AND world. It is also ridiculously difficult and will prepare you for anything, including coding. Having an EE degree from UT austin is extremely lucrative; about 80% of graduates go straight into work, especially those that went to the Engineering EXPO, one of the largest career fairs in the world. The average starting salary for UT EE graduates is about $70,000. I assure you I speak from experience; I'm graduating next semester (from UT Austin EE) and have a position waiting for me at Intel. My tech areas are premed and solid state devices.

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boredinboringbrook in Bolingbrook, Illinois

34 months ago

JJW in Cadillac, Michigan said: 14 years as EE. The best I like about it,
I can invent my own products. Working with other disgruntled firmware/software engineers, we have made our own products and are now all relatively well-off. don't expect much future working for a company for a long time. The only way I would get raises was to apply for new jobs and inflate my current salary.

A software engineer can't do anything without hardware. An EE like me can learn firmware pretty easily. I have seen many a software engineer struggle.
I worked next to one for a few years and after his 'programmer' quit working, he was stuck. I let him flounder for a few days than said, give me your connector. A few solder touch-ups and his programmer was working again. Sure was funny to watch this guy struggle after he thought he could do anything. I had to teach this guy how to use an oscilloscope to probe his I/Os for effective debugging.

A CE major can only use a keyboard, nothing else.
As a EE, I had courses in everything from quantum physics to microwave circuits.

Working for a company, you will find that accountants go to the top of the corporate ladder. Engineers get offices by the back door bathroom. That wasn't how it was back when my father was an electical engineer, but it is now.

The best thing about being a EE, I can do anything electric/electronic.

The best advice, BE A DOCTOR !!!

Don't you need resources and investment for inventing your own products? I'm an EE, been one since 86 and can't find work. I like testing, working with oscopes and soldering. Tested semiconductors for years. Living in Chi-town, unemployed for 9 months. There's nothing here but SW engineers and ME's. Not much EE's. Any suggestions?

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boredinboringbrook in Bolingbrook, Illinois

34 months ago

Trevor in Austin, Texas said: Anyone that gets accepted to UT Austin EE would be a fool not to take advantage of it. It is one of the top rated EE schools in the country AND world. It is also ridiculously difficult and will prepare you for anything, including coding. Having an EE degree from UT austin is extremely lucrative; about 80% of graduates go straight into work, especially those that went to the Engineering EXPO, one of the largest career fairs in the world. The average starting salary for UT EE graduates is about $70,000. I assure you I speak from experience; I'm graduating next semester (from UT Austin EE) and have a position waiting for me at Intel. My tech areas are premed and solid state devices.

If the starting salary for EEs is $70K, and the last job I had as an EE was $73K 5 years ago, and the last job was $60K, then tell me how starting salaries are $70K? Not anymore. They are going down.

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Napo in Huntsville, Alabama

33 months ago

BSEET degree is a waste of money. If you have to go to 4 years college just for technology degree, you better take community college and get Associate to be technician

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dextar12 in Gilbert, Arizona

33 months ago

You will not get hired by most companies as an "Electrical Engineer" with a BSEET from a tech school (Devry etc).

You need a FOUR year degree from an ABET accredited program/university (i.e. BSEE). The mid-size aerospace company I work for will NOT hire a BSEET into an "Electrical Engineering" position...its a company policy. If you have 30 years experience, and a BSEET you will at most be a Principal Technician, or 'Principal Engineering Aide.' Which will put you in a payscale slightly below an entry level "Assoc Engineer" with a ABET BSEE from a 4yr University. Nearly every mid-large company is beginning to follow this practice if they haven't already fully implemented it.

Do NOT waste your time with a Devry degree if you want to be in the payscale (at a mid-large company) of an "Engineer."

The reason they do this is to win more contracts, and to sell the company. Best example I can think of is with dogs...sorry. A pup with AKC certs (ABET BSEE) is going to sell for more than the exact same pup without AKC (Devry BSEET). While there may be some subtle differences, its the same damn dog.

Trust me, I have seen multiple people where I work get burned by this. Do not get a BSEET and expect the same pay as a BSEE, it just won't happen anymore. Heck a BSEE is hardly enough anymore...big dogs like Intel, want a (minimum) MSEE for most EE positions now.

Good luck.

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Eric in Harker Heights, Texas

33 months ago

I started working on my BSEET about a year ago, but my goal is to get my Master as well. Now the problem started when a friend told me that my credits from Devry might not transfer to a mortar and brick school back home after I ETS from the Army.

While working on my school assignments there were many nights that I only slept two hours and there were three times that I did not sleep at all.

I was upset that all this effort would be in vain. So I started a research on the matter. I visited my education center and they told me that my credits will transfer, but not happy with the answer I searched again and kept finding negative comments. Then I read a previous posting with a link to the ABET site:

main.abet.org/aps/AccreditedProgramsDetails.aspx?OrganizationID=7202

I was relieved to find out that there will be no issues transferring my credits. I believe that comments should be backed up with a good source. It doesn't even have to be standard APA, a link would be sufficient. I find many postings to be misleading. We can do better!

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chase in Ft Mitchell, Kentucky

33 months ago

Been reading the posts about the difference on BSEET and BSEE. These two fields are similar in the fact they incorporate electric and thats it. EEngineers know the theory and design, ETechnologists install, fix, maintain, etc.. what EEngineers produce. However, thats not to say technologists don't know about engineering. My former boss didn't go to college for EEngineering, but I have seen him make fools of engineers on job sites. Both fields are needed, you cant have one without the other. Its like my boss told me "if you can prove you know your stuff, BSEE or not you have a good chance of getting the job".

P.S. Im a master electrician who has worked in industrial, automation, and communication with plenty of engineers. Few of those engineers were not very good. Im guessing many of them had no real hands on in field experience. Just cause it looks good on blueprints does not mean its practical. Thats the reason Im going back to college to get my BSEE.

If you don't want to go to school for engineering, then work in the electrical field for 15 years and take the engineering test. Chances of passing are slim, but if you know your stuff then why not. This might be different in certain states, so don't hold me to that.

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Grohlak in Pullman, Washington

32 months ago

The_Gooch in Deerfield Beach, Florida said: Devry?? Better check that school as I am pretty sure they ARE NOT ABET accredited. Do not waste your time with a non-ABET school. Suck it up and get a real BSEE not some cracker jack diploma online.

Umm, actually not only are they accredited (reference: www.abet.org/) but, my senior project was chosen for their accreditation review process of their BS EET program.

As far as what do employers think of the degree? Not only was I snatched up directly out of school, but with the very first job I landed I cleared just over $90k (not counting the $48,000 of tax free travel pay) in my first year with the company.

Don't listen to the elitists’ running around with their nose in the air trying to down play any other program than the one they went through. People are prone to throwing dirt at everything they can to build their own background up. Realize that not only are they just opinions... but, biased ones at that based as you can see by the thread I’m replying to on no facts what-so-ever.

As far as the quality of the education is concerned I would suggest that engineering degrees offered by DeVry are quite a bit more focused and hands on as they remove all of the basket weaving liberal arts courses and replace them with labs. We actually made things, and made them work. Theory in my studies at DeVry were reinforced with application.

One thing to note however, is that because they guarantee course availability year round and by doing such can get you out into the work force a year earlier, they charge quite a bit more per credit hour. Unlike a standard University they will run a class with 3-4 students in it rather than cancel the class and push your graduation date out yet another semester. A degree at DeVry whle a year shorter will cost you twice as much! So in contrary to popular believe the quality of the education may be a bit better... and at a higher cost.

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RRichie09 in Diamond Bar, California

32 months ago

Grohlak in Pullman, Washington said:

1) Yes Devry is accredited but only for BSEET. A BSEET is NOT a BSEE.

2) Anyone who says Devry is junk is only considering their situation. Devry has a purpose, BUT if a person is in a position to choose whether to obtain a BSEE or a BSEET I see no advantage of getting a BSEET over a BSEE.

3) While general ed classes do seem like a waste of time they truly are not. They do not apply to the field you have chosen directly but they indirectly help by allowing you to think differently and to socialize with people who are not engineer minded. Keepign a narrow mind in engineering is big mistake.

4) Making the kind of money that you are making after graduating from Devry is an exception not the rule.

5) In todays world having a BSEE was like having a technical degree in the past. In general if you want to do anything meaningful at work you need atleast a MS.

I understand that you attended devry and things worked out very well for you. I do not know you, nor do I know your situation, but saying that an education from Devry is better than an education from a 4-yr university is a bit mis-guided. Even if you are right a BSEE allows a person to have many more options after they graduate, be it pursuing a masters, or pursuing a PE license, or even attending law school.

I have never taken a Devry course nor worked with anyone with a Devry education so I cannot say anything directly about the education itself, but as far as options and ceilings are concerned a BSEE is a much better choice.

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MarkP in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan

32 months ago

The schools like to advertise EE as being so versatile, but when you get out there in the real world, employers often hold that EE degree against you. "You're over qualified". "You'll just leave once <insert name of big name tech company> starts hiring again." "Why don't you go work at Google/Facebook/Apple, I hear they're hiring engineers." (yeah those firms are hiring....< 1 in 1000 applicants!).

Besides, if salaries in EE or CS/IT ever do rise significantly, the 'leadership' in this country has made it perfectly clear that large numbers of 'guest workers' will be allowed in, to suppress wages.

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MarkP in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan

32 months ago

On the topic of EE, I know guys who graduated a decade ago, in amidst the big tech bust, who *still* aren't employed, even to this day. Nothing like going to school for 5 years, getting top marks, yet still not even getting responses from employers after submitting thousands of personalized/customized resumes/cover letters. The EE profession hasn't grown in over a decade, over a million guest workers have been brought in, and the high value areas of EE such as computer hardware design have shrunk dramatically due to SoC and other IP re-use programs, CAD tools, etc.

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MarkP in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan

32 months ago

Josh in Canandaigua, New York said: Don't take this the wrong way, but if you can't find a job in EE, the problem isn't EE, it's you. There are so many jobs out there for all engineering disciplines it's ridiculous. Sure job hunts can be tough fresh out of school, but if someone simply cannot find anything after a significant and exhaustive search then it comes down to:

1. The search really wasn't exhaustive enough
2. They live in a nowhere town with 2 companies and are unwilling to move
3. They aren't aggressive enough in the job search
4. They aren't making an attempt to learn the specific things employers want
5. They have a track record of crap performance

I would disagree with most of this. Throughout much of the past decade, I've observed perfectly qualified new grads send out thousands of resumes, not even to receive responses from the employers. Young men, willing to move anywhere and do almost anything, not even get more than a handful of responses to their job applications.

As for lots of jobs existing, that's laughable. Usually the employers are looking for so-called 'purple squirrels', people who have a whole laundry list of experiene with very specific pieces of hardware or processes, rather than general knowledge and aptitude. Candidates rejected because they knew version 1.4 of a piece of CAD software instead of version 1.3. Jobs that were formerly entry-level in the late 1990s, now are asking for 5-10 years of experience. Of course, salaries are now just a fraction of what they were in the 1990s as well, and practically no stock options to be had.

I've seen too many lives ruined through this nonsense. Tech schools were chock-full of extremely bright students in the 1990s, yet the industry has not expanded since the collapse and the very weak 'recovery'.

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ushawk1 in Rockwall, Texas

32 months ago

Check out University Of North Dakota. They have a full BSEE and it is all online. Well, exception is you have to fly to ND for a week to complete all your labs. Like a year's worth of labs in a week. DeVry EET would be good though, especially if you have experience. Pick a degree on your experiences. You will go much farther that way.
For new grads my employer requires them to have what I call 'classical' engineering degrees (ME, EE, nothing with a 'T' in it) and at least 3.6 GPA from a "big name" university. I have an Assoicate's in Electronics and a BA in history, plus I have an incomplete EE I started on at UND (might finish in the next 10 years I hope). I came with experience from a smaller company where I did engineering at project, design, and system levels, as well as planning and tech work. I was so good at doing more than just tech work I ended up doing engineering and beyond. Small companies are definitley the way to go if you want to shoot to the top. Anyway, I got a level 2 electrical engineer job with a major aerospace company, mainly on experience. No one seemed to care about my edumaction. Everything is segmented in a big company though. EE does EE work, ME does ME work, etc., etc. No room to shine or cross train or learn new skills. Ultimately, everybody has a degree these days, and if you have experience I find most employers look at that over education. I would.
I get more respect for having served in the military and having real work experience in multiple disciplines (that I hold no degree in) than the 4.0 bookworm engineers from UT Austin. The flip side is, they'll probably make VP and I'll never make it past a middle manager.
BTW, all that crap about getting a PE is useless in aerospace. If you go to work for the city or a power plant that PE is probably needed. If you want to design complex electrical systems for military aircraft, you don't need it. I think the EE vs EET debate only applies to certain industries.

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Creeper in Texarkana, Texas

31 months ago

Josh in Canandaigua, New York said: Don't take this the wrong way, but if you can't find a job in EE, the problem isn't EE, it's you. There are so many jobs out there for all engineering disciplines it's ridiculous. Sure job hunts can be tough fresh out of school, but if someone simply cannot find anything after a significant and exhaustive search then it comes down to:

1. The search really wasn't exhaustive enough
2. They live in a nowhere town with 2 companies and are unwilling to move
3. They aren't aggressive enough in the job search
4. They aren't making an attempt to learn the specific things employers want
5. They have a track record of crap performance


I call bull on this. I was the highest-GPA guy in my graduating class. I had more published papers than some professors. Rock-solid references. Willing to move anywhere (inside and outside US), not asking for ridiculous pay, don't mind working nights, weekends and overtime. Applied everywhere. No job offers. Some interviews, most ended up with the job cancelled.
Nine months later, still no job. Everybody wants a guy with 5 years experience. This is the reason for the 'US engineer shortage' - nobody wants to hire a guy fresh out of college, so those guys never get 5 years experience. Since they don't get those 5 years, the companies have to go with an H1B.
An MS in EE might work great for you, I've got no data on the subject. Not a BS. Unless you're lucky or have the charisma and brainiac powers of Richard Feynman, it's about as worthless as a degree in Women's Studies. You spend 4-5 years working your ass off, making good grades, skipping lots of fun stuff to do that. Then you graduate, and there's... nothing.
Computer Science, on the other hand, is damn good right now. For one, you learn real job-related skills while in college (programming). This makes you valuable to employers right away. I've seen many more CS jobs than EE.

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bissi in Huntsville, Alabama

30 months ago

reputable companies don't hire BSEET graduate as Engineer, even though some may be as brighter as BSEE's.If you are BSEET garduate, ask yourself why didn't take BSEE program or why your school( like Devry) doesn't offer one.

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bissi in Huntsville, Alabama

30 months ago

Eric in Harker Heights, Texas said: I started working on my BSEET about a year ago, but my goal is to get my Master as well. Now the problem started when a friend told me that my credits from Devry might not transfer to a mortar and brick school back home after I ETS from the Army.

While working on my school assignments there were many nights that I only slept two hours and there were three times that I did not sleep at all.

I was upset that all this effort would be in vain. So I started a research on the matter. I visited my education center and they told me that my credits will transfer, but not happy with the answer I searched again and kept finding negative comments. Then I read a previous posting with a link to the ABET site:

main.abet.org/aps/AccreditedProgramsDetails.aspx?OrganizationID=7202

I was relieved to find out that there will be no issues transferring my credits. I believe that comments should be backed up with a good source. It doesn't even have to be standard APA, a link would be sufficient. I find many postings to be misleading. We can do better!

you can't transfer your BSEET credits to a BSEE program, that's all the issue. If you have a MastersSEET and want to transfer to BSEE, you will have to start BSEE all over

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