Company bought out - I still have my job, but new boss...

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Comments (5)

MJK1219 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

65 months ago

The company I work for was bought out by a different company. I am currently EA for the president of the company - and when the new president comes in, I will be his EA. I really want to be prepared for the change-over, and am wondering what are some suggestions for questions that I need to ask him to figure out exactly what he needs from me? Every boss is different and utilizes EAs differently. I get the feeling that the new boss hasn't had an EA before and so I feel like I need to take the reins on this one... I already asked him for a one-on-one sit down so that we could figure things out, but I'd like to go in there prepared with details and a plan... besides just "So what do you need me to do on a daily basis?"

Does anyone have any suggestions?

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Charlene-O in San Diego, California

63 months ago

I suggest you don't ask them what they need, but rather show the new boss by your actions. Break the ice and make them feel as comfortable as possible by being open, friendly and communicative. They will be on their own learning curve, so don't over-pester them, let them come to you at first. While you may be eager to "set things up" this person has bigger issues to deal with. Depending on the personality of the individual, email can be invaluable. It will allow you to make suggestions about things that need to be done, while letting them get a feel for your personality. Be clever, witty and upbeat. The key here is that you do your best to let the newcomer see that you can adapt to work with *them* as an individual --be as natural as possible and find creative ways to let them know that you not only have their back covered, but want to help them with a smooth changeover.

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Evelynh in Australia

63 months ago

Charlene-O in San Diego, California said: I suggest you don't ask them what they need, but rather show the new boss by your actions. Break the ice and make them feel as comfortable as possible by being open, friendly and communicative. They will be on their own learning curve, so don't over-pester them, let them come to you at first. While you may be eager to "set things up" this person has bigger issues to deal with. Depending on the personality of the individual, email can be invaluable. It will allow you to make suggestions about things that need to be done, while letting them get a feel for your personality. Be clever, witty and upbeat. The key here is that you do your best to let the newcomer see that you can adapt to work with *them* as an individual --be as natural as possible and find creative ways to let them know that you not only have their back covered, but want to help them with a smooth changeover.

Charlene, I agree with your response. When I first started supporting my executive, there was rarely any opportunity for me to sit down with him to discuss anything because he was just so busy. The fisrt few weeks I just had to adapt to his working style but also be extremely attentive to his needs. As time went by, the executive would approach me when he needed something done. Do take the initiative and be forward thinking. I read through all his emails to understand what projects he was working on and get to know who he was associated with etc. At times when he was frequently traveling, I would take the time to clean his desk and organise his files. He was very happy with that and asked me whether I could organise his office from time to time. Build rapport with your support person. You'll find that they'll eventually open up to you and once the trust is there, the work he will ask you to do will come rolling.Be natural. Charlene is right by saying show by your actions. You seem like a very dedicated EA and he will appreciate your efforts.

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Joni Walker in Irvine, California

42 months ago

I agree as well - it's a good idea if they adapt to the environment and that you don't spoon feed them as then they will come to expect this behavior; then you'll definitely have problems.

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kachhadiyaharshad in Rajkot, India

34 months ago

gud luck..............

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