Does having a certification increase salary and H.R. job opportunities?

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roasthawg in Auburn, California

61 months ago

It sure does... check out this link to payscale.com regarding certified hr professional's salaries: www.payscale.com/ research/US/Certification=Sr._ Professional_in_Human_ Resources_%28SPHR%29/Salary

Here's a link to get you ready for the PHR/SPHR certification exam if you decide to go that route: hr-resourcestoday.com/

Good luck!

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roasthawg in Auburn, California

61 months ago

Sorry, here's the link for the software: hr-resourcestoday.com/

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jenn in Springboro, Ohio

60 months ago

I think it depends on your location. I have my PHR certification and have since 2005. I don't think it's hindered me at all. It's a great tool and, because you have to re-certify ever three years, you stay on top of your knowledge and skills.

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Alan Pinney in Orleans, Indiana

56 months ago

Dang, starry. I was on here looking for an HR job in Waco. Maybe I shouldn't now, huh? I agree with your comment:

"HR is only as good as your non-perfect boss and senior mgmt usually doesnt give a squat about HR unless it deals with the final steps of hiring/firing/benefits."

That's kind of the situation I am in. It's a young company and they value engineers over anyone with business sense.

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Diligent in Maquoketa, Iowa

56 months ago

Alan Pinney in Orleans, Indiana said: Dang, starry. I was on here looking for an HR job in Waco. Maybe I shouldn't now, huh? I agree with your comment:

"HR is only as good as your non-perfect boss and senior mgmt usually doesnt give a squat about HR unless it deals with the final steps of hiring/firing/benefits."

That's kind of the situation I am in. It's a young company and they value engineers over anyone with business sense.

I know someone in HR who has given me the same comment regarding engineers, etc. Sad, but true.

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SK2010 in Berryville, Arkansas

56 months ago

I have 4 years of experience in HR and I am currently studying to get my PHR certification, the company that I work for is currently offering me an HR Director position, we are in the process of negotiating my pay, what would you say is a fair range of pay without me having my certification?

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Kaya in Duluth, Georgia

55 months ago

cyulove in Memphis, Tennessee said: If you have 15 years experience in the H.R. field, why do you say the certification hurt you? Especially since in the H.R. field, experience is what they look for.

Also, I want to get into H.R. before I graduate a year from now but have had no opportunities yet. Should I go for internship or what? Let me know your opinion.

Thanx...

You should definitely do an internship. You will gain the experience required to get your feet wet in the field of HR.

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Kayla in Duluth, Georgia

55 months ago

cyulove in Memphis, Tennessee said: I'm thinking about getting a cert in human resources.

Also, i'm a grad student getting a M.A. in human resources management and development. Will the cert make it easier to break into H.R.?

If you have a master's degree in HR and no HR experience, you have already hurt your chances. You should have tried to get into the field by doing an internship while you were an undergrad. I'm an employer and we had a position in HR for a Generalist and we received resumes from people with Master's degrees in HR. Unfortunately, that particular job only required a Bachelor's degree at the very minimum so we did not interview the ones with Master's degrees as we felt they were over qualified. We would have hired someone with a Bachelor's degree who has their PHR certification over someone who has a Master's degree in HR. Students have to be very careful when deciding to complete a Master's degree. I look at it this way.... If your undergrad degree is a BBA in Management with an HR concentration or a BA in HR, then you would have taken most of the classes required to have a successful career in HR. You have to ask yourself... How much more can I make with the Master's degree if I already have my PHR (or SPHR) certification? The key is this.... Make sure that you gain the experience or the MA degree will be worthless and you will have a hard time breaking into the field of HR. Post grad internships are also a good option.

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Shay in Spring Hill, Florida

54 months ago

Kayla in Duluth, Georgia said: If you have a master's degree in HR and no HR experience, you have already hurt your chances. You should have tried to get into the field by doing an internship while you were an undergrad. I'm an employer and we had a position in HR for a Generalist and we received resumes from people with Master's degrees in HR. Unfortunately, that particular job only required a Bachelor's degree at the very minimum so we did not interview the ones with Master's degrees as we felt they were over qualified. We would have hired someone with a Bachelor's degree who has their PHR certification over someone who has a Master's degree in HR. Students have to be very careful when deciding to complete a Master's degree. I look at it this way.... If your undergrad degree is a BBA in Management with an HR concentration or a BA in HR, then you would have taken most of the classes required to have a successful career in HR. You have to ask yourself... How much more can I make with the Master's degree if I already have my PHR (or SPHR) certification? The key is this.... Make sure that you gain the experience or the MA degree will be worthless and you will have a hard time breaking into the field of HR. Post grad internships are also a good option.

You just described the exact situation that I was afraid of. I current have MBA dual concentratin in HR Mgt and Organizational Psychology and Development. I don't mind taking a pay cut so long as I can gain the experience necessary to be a good HR manager down the line.

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Dewailer in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

54 months ago

I'm currenlty seeking to get into the HR field. I have VERY little experience in this field and I'm well aware I'll have to work my way up. I'm willing and I'm very confident I can do it, as long as someone is willing to train me. I've been in the hospitality field for more than 10 years and would like to follow my heart into HR. I'm relocating from the Caribbean to Fort Lauderdale, FL in mid July. Should anyone know of any internships paid or unpaid or entry level jobs in this field, I'm certainly ready to apply.

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HRMgr in Bedford, Indiana

54 months ago

To the individuals with the master's degrees I would suggest possibly leaving it off your resume. It is good that you have the knowledge and you will be a greater asset to the organization that picks you up, but most people assume you will want too much money or are overqualified. And if you don't want too much money, they will think you are merely using them as a stepping stone. It's a tough spot to be in. Best of luck.

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TinaG in Goose Creek, South Carolina

48 months ago

Kayla in Duluth, Georgia said: If you have a master's degree in HR and no HR experience, you have already hurt your chances. You should have tried to get into the field by doing an internship while you were an undergrad. I'm an employer and we had a position in HR for a Generalist and we received resumes from people with Master's degrees in HR. Unfortunately, that particular job only required a Bachelor's degree at the very minimum so we did not interview the ones with Master's degrees as we felt they were over qualified. We would have hired someone with a Bachelor's degree who has their PHR certification over someone who has a Master's degree in HR. Students have to be very careful when deciding to complete a Master's degree. I look at it this way.... If your undergrad degree is a BBA in Management with an HR concentration or a BA in HR, then you would have taken most of the classes required to have a successful career in HR. You have to ask yourself... How much more can I make with the Master's degree if I already have my PHR (or SPHR) certification? The key is this.... Make sure that you gain the experience or the MA degree will be worthless and you will have a hard time breaking into the field of HR. Post grad internships are also a good option.

I just read your comment and you seem to be very knowledge in this areaa. So why question to you, is the HR field a good field to get into for the future? I've been hearing the in the next ten years it will not be.

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April in Creston, Iowa

46 months ago

I have more than eight years experience in human resources. I have my BS in HR Management, and my last three positions have been eliminated. None of which lasted much longer than a year. I have now been unemployed for close to a year and a half. My last two positions were as an HR Manager. Everyone of my previous employers "preferred" a PHR or SPHR but my background and education was good enough to get in the door. I had to attend a class at IWD and was advised my career choice will not be in demand for at least the next ten years. I was told to pick a new career. Now I dont know what to do, I still have 20 plus thousand dollars in student loans...go back to school are you kidding me. After reading the comments above I am glad I have not gone on for my Masters. I do believe obtaining your PHR/SPHR cant hurt in obtaining a position however, for all of the new graduates with no experience once you graduate you will be in competition with all of the experienced HR professionals out of work. And I agree the pay is not what it use to be. I wish all of you great success in your search. I love human resources and it has been very rewarding.

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Forist in Berlin, New Hampshire

46 months ago

cyulove in Memphis, Tennessee said: I'm thinking about getting a cert in human resources.

Also, i'm a grad student getting a M.A. in human resources management and development. Will the cert make it easier to break into H.R.?

There are two ways to look at it. First, PHR/SPHR are certifications of comprehension of HR processes and law. The designation is an indication of professionalism and warrants recognition. When a company is in the midst of serious problems involving labor they don't go to a high school graduate working in an HR department. They need and seek professional advise. That's what they get with a PHR/SPHR. If they have a compentent person in their HR division they avoid law suits and court. Otherwise, they need an attorney. On the down side is the economy. Certified personnel typically draw higher than average wages. Companies that are cash tight fear that hiring a professional HR person is that he/she will bolt when better offers come about. Leaving a company with unfinished business creates complications that most officiers want to avoid. Hence, hiring compentent/experienced uncertified personnel can be an advantage. However, the majority of degreed HR employees lack the knowledge that comes with preparation for the PHR/SPHR designations. My suggestion is that you should go for the PHR. The economy is bound to rebound and companies will lean toward higher certifications.

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Christine in Lawrenceville, Georgia

45 months ago

I am graduating soon with my Bachelor's degree I live in Lilburn,Georgia.You seem to be very knowledgeable about HR job opportunities. I was wondering if you had a position available in your business or do you know of any positions available in GA. Thanks

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Christine in Lawrenceville, Georgia

45 months ago

Kaya in Duluth, Georgia said: You should definitely do an internship. You will gain the experience required to get your feet wet in the field of HR.

I am graduating soon with my Bachelor's degree I live in Lilburn,Georgia.You seem to be very knowledgeable about HR job opportunities. I was wondering if you had a position available in your business or do you know of any positions available in GA. Thanks

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Jasmine S. in Lithonia, Georgia

45 months ago

I believe many people are placing wrong information on this page. If you have 15 years experience, that is why they are not interested in hiring you because of pay. PHR/SPHR certification is null and void. I'm interested in Organizational Development, and while doing my research I found an opportunity that pays 450,000 with 10 years experience in New York while the opportunities only needing 2 years experience pay closer to 75,000. Experience can kill your job hunt because we are in a recession. Cut your resume so it may at least work in your favor. Companies do not want to pay for 15 years of experience.

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MTJ in San Diego, California

43 months ago

The HRCI certifications (PHR, SPHR, GPHR) require education AND experience. You can't sit for the certification tests until you meet the experience/education requirements.

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Rimi in Newington, Connecticut

41 months ago

I passed PHR today. I am selling my preparation materials. Drop me a mail with your name & no.if your are interested buying.

rimi.sengupta@gmail.com

1. 2010 SHRM Learing System, with CD, SPHR Preparation book and Online access to updates and case studies to the material till may 2012.
2. PHR / SPHR Professional in Human Resources Certification Study Guide, Anne M Bogardus, Third Edition with CD(flash card, test Questions)
3. HRCI's PHR & SPHR Certification Guide, By Raymond B. Weinberg(125 Solved questions)
4. HRCI SPHR Assesment Exam (75 questions, unsolved)

thanks

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Jon Koch in Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin

39 months ago

I have my MBA and am in the process of earning my a Human Resources certificate. What is the best way to break into the human resources field and is a certificate a sufficient to do so. Thanks for any help that anyone is able to give.

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Josh in Vancouver, British Columbia

38 months ago

starry in Waco, Texas said: Do not get into HR unless it's a last resort. I have a BBA in HR Mgmt, 4 yrs experience out of school, PHR Certified on 1st attempt with little study, and this is the worst career move for me.

HR is only as good as your non-perfect boss and senior mgmt usually doesnt give a squat about HR unless it deals with the final steps of hiring/firing/benefits. It is not worth it if you are truly ambitious! The money is not there unless you work for say, Disney.

Take a look at what CHROs make. Companies rely on heavily on strategic HR professionals to ensure that they have the right people to move the company forward. Clearly, you haven't worked for any companies that care about their people resources. If you want to move forward in your HR career, look for companies that care about their future.

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BC in Ramsey, New Jersey

37 months ago

cyulove in Memphis, Tennessee said: If you have 15 years experience in the H.R. field, why do you say the certification hurt you? Especially since in the H.R. field, experience is what they look for.

Also, I want to get into H.R. before I graduate a year from now but have had no opportunities yet. Should I go for internship or what? Let me know your opinion.

Thanx...

Internships are invaluable. It's an opportunity to find out if you're going to like what you've chosen to do. It lets the company know what you can do and you may get a job offer. At the very least, a recommendation from someone in the field. I did an internship in my senior yr and realized I could not do what I thought I wanted to do until the internship. I have been in the field for over 15 years and I think the best way to learn is by doing. You can't learn how to handle an employee who is crying in your office because she didn't get a promotion. There is a lot of seasoning to get to that point.

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BC in Ramsey, New Jersey

37 months ago

June Des Moines, IA said: Companies do not want to pay for your certification.....

Companies pay for the value of the job and not what the applicant comes to the table with. If the job does not require a certification, then why should they pay for it. It was your choice to get it. The same goes for a Master's Degree. At my former company, we would not hire someone who did not have experience between their undergraduate degree and their master's. Anyway, let the company pay for your graduate degree.

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jewel in North Chicago, Illinois

36 months ago

SPHR in Las Vegas in Las Vegas, Nevada said: If a person is serious about the field of HR, certification is a must! Be prepared, those initials can be very intimidating and many people still in the "personnel" mode do not have a clue about the value a PHR or a SPHR can bring to an organziation.

Go for it!

Hello,
If I have my Masters in HR Management, so I get to use any abbreviations after my name? My school has not been helpful in explaining any of that to me and they give me the run around when I ask to try and find out. I know there are certifications such as the PHR...but many other Masters programs have it- like social workers can put "MSW" after their names at their job...so I am confused because I cannot find info about a possible 'MHRM'...? thanks!!

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forgetlogic in Jamaica, New York

36 months ago

yea

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jewel in North Chicago, Illinois

36 months ago

forgetlogic in Jamaica, New York said: yea

??

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pat in Memphis, Tennessee

35 months ago

SPHR in Las Vegas in Las Vegas, Nevada said: If a person is serious about the field of HR, certification is a must! Be prepared, those initials can be very intimidating and many people still in the "personnel" mode do not have a clue about the value a PHR or a SPHR can bring to an organziation.

Go for it!

Question I have no experience, but im currently a property mgr. but pursing a degree in business mgt concentration in h/r. i know to get certified but can I be certified without exp. to help me in the door.

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pat in Memphis, Tennessee

35 months ago

Rimi in Newington, Connecticut said: I passed PHR today. I am selling my preparation materials. Drop me a mail with your name & no.if your are interested buying.

rimi.sengupta@gmail.com

1. 2010 SHRM Learing System, with CD, SPHR Preparation book and Online access to updates and case studies to the material till may 2012.
2. PHR / SPHR Professional in Human Resources Certification Study Guide, Anne M Bogardus, Third Edition with CD(flash card, test Questions)
3. HRCI's PHR & SPHR Certification Guide, By Raymond B. Weinberg(125 Solved questions)
4. HRCI SPHR Assesment Exam (75 questions, unsolved)

thanks

please do you still have??
how was the test hard how many question? exsample question like what?? thanks in advance for your help!

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Eva in Greenwood, Indiana

34 months ago

I'm applyig to grad programs now and my question is, does the school you get your HRM degree in affect your chances of employment afterwards?

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siliconvalleyhr in Palo Alto, California

34 months ago

I think a certification would increase your HR knowledge and confidence thus help you get that promotion you want. If you want a long career in HR, invest the time and money. Actually, some employers will pay for the tuition. Ask and see what they say.

I'm a moderator of a HR and Recruiter forum on Linkedin. High-Tech HR and Recruiters in the Bay Area.

Lisa

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Second career in Bergenfield, New Jersey

32 months ago

I am looking into HR as a second career. If you don't have HR degree would it be better to get a second bachelor's in HR or Masters in HR. With an earned BA, it looks like I can do either one of them in about 2 years. What will be better for me to enter into HR market?

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Second career in Bergenfield, New Jersey

32 months ago

I am thinking about a career change.
I don't have a degree in HR nor any experiences.

Will it be better to get a second bachelor's in HR or masters in HR for me to get into the field of HR?

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I NEED ADVICE in Saint Louis, Missouri

32 months ago

I got hired on as a HR assistant for $3 less than I currently make in my current position which has nothing at all to deal with HR. I am a junior at my university pursuing a bachelor's degree in Business Management with a minor in Psych. I want to do HR after I graduate, do you think I made a good decision by taking the lower paying job but that will provide me with experience? or do you think I should take the job I have because it pays more?

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cam in Amherst, New Hampshire

32 months ago

I disagree with you. I am an HR Director and have been involved in all areas of HR for over 30 years. If you are just out of school, you have to build your experience in order to earn credibility.

HR is a support function to an organization and you should view your role in this way. You may be fortunate enough to be involved in high level strategic decisions, as I am now. However, when I first began my career, I was not involved at that level.

Also, during the course of my career, I owned my own business. If you truly want to be an "HR Business Partner" you need to understand the reality of business - the hard way. A real world perspective on business operations versus what you will learn in a textbook is miles apart.

I'm fortunate to have the job I have and be involved at the level that I am, but it took me a long time to get here.

Maybe if your senior level management felt you had a real world understanding of their business operations, they would involve you in more high level decisions. There is a reason they value engineers over everyone else.

Alan Pinney in Orleans, Indiana said: Dang, starry. I was on here looking for an HR job in Waco. Maybe I shouldn't now, huh? I agree with your comment:

"HR is only as good as your non-perfect boss and senior mgmt usually doesnt give a squat about HR unless it deals with the final steps of hiring/firing/benefits."

That's kind of the situation I am in. It's a young company and they value engineers over anyone with business sense.

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ALEJANDRA C in Miami, Florida

31 months ago

I'm about to complete my BA in Communication Arts at a university in Florida and was planning to get a Masters in HR Management, is this the correct way to go? or should I just get an HR certification? I have a little experience in the HR Field, but would like to per sue that as my career. I'm currently searching for HR jobs, but their are very few entry level. At this point I'm a little confuse on what to do, can anyone suggest anything? Also, does anyone know where I can take a payroll course preferably ADP?

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Lauren in Arlington, Virginia

31 months ago

I NEED ADVICE in Saint Louis, Missouri said: I got hired on as a HR assistant for $3 less than I currently make in my current position which has nothing at all to deal with HR. I am a junior at my university pursuing a bachelor's degree in Business Management with a minor in Psych. I want to do HR after I graduate, do you think I made a good decision by taking the lower paying job but that will provide me with experience? or do you think I should take the job I have because it pays more?

You know what you want to do, so take the lower paying job and get experience/actually confirm what you might want to do. If you didn't know what you wanted to do, I would take take the higher paying job until you figured it out.

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A.Bartwal in Kingston Upon Hull, United Kingdom

31 months ago

I have just completed Master in HR (MSc. HRM) and in my undergraduate also I had HR as major (BBA HR). I have 14 months of experience in customer service but no particular experience inn HR field and currently working with NEXT as a sales consultant. Can please someone help me with, how to kick start my career in HR as I know I have to start with the lowest level but I am really confused how and from where?

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CC in Clifton Park, New York

31 months ago

I am about to graduate with an MBA and found out that my school offers a certificate in human resources management. Getting this certificate would not cost me anything extra as the courses are part of the mba program and the others are electives being used towards the mba. In my current and past jobs, I have 10 years experience in sales commission compensation and pay. Would this experience qualify for some HR related experience to get into the field? I have worked in the sales department throughout this time.

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ans3332 in Opelousas, Louisiana

30 months ago

I am in a position similar to some of you. I have a BS in psychology and am currently a certified teacher. I have a job until August, and since I graduated in psych I have been interested in HR. I am willing to start at the bottom and have even applied to a few HR entry level jobs at least an hour away. I'm not really sure how to break into the field, and I do not want to get an MBA or Masters in HR without experience first.

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Katherine in Miami, Florida

29 months ago

ALEJANDRA C in Miami, Florida said: I'm about to complete my BA in Communication Arts at a university in Florida and was planning to get a Masters in HR Management, is this the correct way to go? or should I just get an HR certification? I have a little experience in the HR Field, but would like to per sue that as my career. I'm currently searching for HR jobs, but their are very few entry level. At this point I'm a little confuse on what to do, can anyone suggest anything? Also, does anyone know where I can take a payroll course preferably ADP?

Have you gotten any responses? I am graduating now with my BPA- Bachelor's in Public Administration and I want to get into HR. I am currently working for a foundation as the administrative assistant to the CEO. I am stuck because I do not know if I should pursure a masters in hr or just get certified, try to find work and then in the future get my masters in management or something to make me more marketable to big corporations. If anyone has any advice I would truly appreciate it!

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A.Bartwal in Kingston Upon Hull, United Kingdom

29 months ago

I have 5 months recruitment, selection and training experience in an MNC and have got my master's degree in HR. I use to work as a sales consultant but currently working in the admin office at two of the Next stores. Do you think this adds an HR experience in my CV and hlep me in future. ??????

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Peony in Duluth, Georgia

29 months ago

As a corporate Recruiter, and I have seen this many times, I think you should first become certified before you get the Master's degree. If you are looking to get into HR with little or no experience, getting a Master 's degree in HR now without some experience will put you into the "over qualified category". I think you should go for the Master's after having at least 2+ years of HR experience.

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tspann in Charlotte, North Carolina

27 months ago

I guess I went about things a litle backward. I got an MA in Organizational Management and HR, because I was hoping to change careers. I have some HR experience, but not enough to be relevent. In reading the last post I think I've shot myself in the foot because I am having difficulty even finding an entry level HR position. What can I do? Any suggestions would be helpful.

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Derek Ream in Dallas, Texas

21 months ago

I will be graduating this Saturday from the University of North Texas with my B.A in sociology with a minor in psychology. I have been working within the mortgage industry (Capital One, Bank of America, Old Republic) as well as a consultant for a Dallas-based piano firm. With that being said, I was VERY VERY fortunate to be offered a position in a Fortune 100 company in Dallas as a healthcare recruiter. My degree is in the social and behavioral sciences, I have a lot of academic accolades, but, I knew I wanted to get into recruiting as well as HR in general. Needless to say, I was amazed at the starting pay, the commission structure and benefits and perks of this position. All of this one week before graduation!

I will utilize this experience, really get to grasp the basics of recruiting and hopefully transition into being certified and really focusing on the recruitment side of HR. I love behavioral analysis, so, one thing I would like to utilize is my training in that technique in the business world at some point. As far as graduate school, I know I want to go for psychology. I have slowly been leaning towards I/O psychology, but we shall see.

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anna marie caulder in Cleveland, Tennessee

20 months ago

Rimi in Newington, Connecticut said: I passed PHR today. I am selling my preparation materials. Drop me a mail with your name & no.if your are interested buying.

rimi.sengupta@gmail.com

1. 2010 SHRM Learing System, with CD, SPHR Preparation book and Online access to updates and case studies to the material till may 2012.
2. PHR / SPHR Professional in Human Resources Certification Study Guide, Anne M Bogardus, Third Edition with CD(flash card, test Questions)
3. HRCI's PHR & SPHR Certification Guide, By Raymond B. Weinberg(125 Solved questions)
4. HRCI SPHR Assesment Exam (75 questions, unsolved)

thanks

can you facebook me a message @ anna marie caulder----------------- if you have material

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anna marie caulder in Cleveland, Tennessee

20 months ago

can you face book me a private message-on facebook anna marie caulder-if you have material-thanks anna

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Geena in Forest Hills, New York

19 months ago

Kayla in Duluth, Georgia said: If you have a master's degree in HR and no HR experience, you have already hurt your chances. You should have tried to get into the field by doing an internship while you were an undergrad. I'm an employer and we had a position in HR for a Generalist and we received resumes from people with Master's degrees in HR. Unfortunately, that particular job only required a Bachelor's degree at the very minimum so we did not interview the ones with Master's degrees as we felt they were over qualified. We would have hired someone with a Bachelor's degree who has their PHR certification over someone who has a Master's degree in HR. Students have to be very careful when deciding to complete a Master's degree. I look at it this way.... If your undergrad degree is a BBA in Management with an HR concentration or a BA in HR, then you would have taken most of the classes required to have a successful career in HR. You have to ask yourself... How much more can I make with the Master's degree if I already have my PHR (or SPHR) certification? The key is this.... Make sure that you gain the experience or the MA degree will be worthless and you will have a hard time breaking into the field of HR. Post grad internships are also a good option.

My situation is what you have described...to make it tougher for me I have got my masters in India....but yes I do ve 1 year of work exp. as an HR generalist at a software organization. Have been job searching for almost 2months now , yet to receive an interview call...If you are aware of an HR requirement in New York, or if you have any suggestions please let me know. I would really appreciate it...!

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ZoeinNC in Charlotte, North Carolina

19 months ago

Geena in Forest Hills, New York said: My situation is what you have described...to make it tougher for me I have got my masters in India....but yes I do ve 1 year of work exp. as an HR generalist at a software organization. Have been job searching for almost 2months now , yet to receive an interview call...If you are aware of an HR requirement in New York, or if you have any suggestions please let me know. I would really appreciate it...!

I'm going to share with you the observations that I have made over my career, starting with the most sage advice I've ever been given. I am an executive in Organizational Development for a global corporation. We just transformed our infrastructure to eliminate the role of a traditional CHRO and replaced it with a CLO (Chief Learning Officer). Learning & Development, Human Resources, Talent Management, and Organizational Development all tree up to the CLO. This is the trend as organizations move to a high performance learning culture.

When I went to college, I was told NOT to major in business or human resources. Organizations hire individuals who can contribute something unique. If you have a degree in either field, don't tout the degree, tout your experience, and experience is not the number of years you've spent doing something. Keep in mind SPHRs and PHRs mean nothing to the strategic objectives of the organization, at the end of the day, there is no empirical business evidence that they improve the bottom line, the are unique only to HR. There are more relevant certification programs with much greater business impact than SHRM's. SHRM's recent standardization stunt truly put the nail in their coffin with executives. HRSP is far more respected in upper management tiers. I only point this out from a resume building standpoint. it's critical to have that business experience or to, at the very least, possess the acumen to be able to translate theoretical HR into practical business metrics (not HR metrics).

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ZoeinNC in Charlotte, North Carolina

19 months ago

Second career in Bergenfield, New Jersey said: I am thinking about a career change.
I don't have a degree in HR nor any experiences.

Will it be better to get a second bachelor's in HR or masters in HR for me to get into the field of HR?

I am not sure if you are still on here, but I just read this post. Don't get your Master's in HR. I am an executive, I oversee all of HR, L&D, and Org. Effectiveness. I was hired into my role as SVP from a position as a VP in Sales. The reason I was awarded this opportunity was because my career had been developed in the business area, where I had direct responsibility for my impact on P&L. Most executives over the HR function do not come from HR and have you ever heard of a CEO from HR? Probably not. The reason why HR is a dying field (not dying, but evolving) is because it has become an insular function within the organization. The concepts, SHRM certifications, are not brining unique impact. PHRs and SPHRs only matter to other HR people. I actually have struggled with my certified people, in that the knowledge they gain is knowledge only, and when used, especially around law, is interpreted in an HR view and not from the view of a lawyer who knows the case law and appeals. What results are overly confident well-intentioned people who are too cautious in employment decisions. (I read a statistic from Harvard that said most employment lawsuits that make it to court expose misinformation by highly "qualified" HR professionals at the heart of the suit. That has also been our experience). L&D, OD, Change Management are the certifications to pursue, and are what will absorb traditional HR in the next 10 years.

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Tahmina in Sunnyside, New York

12 months ago

CC in Clifton Park, New York said: I am about to graduate with an MBA and found out that my school offers a certificate in human resources management. Getting this certificate would not cost me anything extra as the courses are part of the mba program and the others are electives being used towards the mba. In my current and past jobs, I have 10 years experience in sales commission compensation and pay. Would this experience qualify for some HR related experience to get into the field? I have worked in the sales department throughout this time.

What college/university did you attend? I am actually looking to take some certificate courses in HR that I can eventually transfer into a graduate program.

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