ADN versus BDN

Get new comments by email
You can cancel email alerts at anytime.
Comments (14)

Pony in El Paso, Texas

28 months ago

I would love to be a nurse and can see myself going to school for four years. However I just don't see myself doing a four year program.

Do BDNs really get hired more than ADNs? Do I have a chance in this down job market?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Pony in El Paso, Texas

28 months ago

Ooops, I meant to say I can see myself going for TWO years.... not four.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

SusanSuzanna in Fremont, California

28 months ago

I know where you’re coming from; I didn’t have 4 years to sit around in a class either so I enrolled in the online RN to BSN from Unitek College.

The program was 18 months compared to 4 years. After I graduated and moved up in my job, I’m the one that makes the hiring decisions where I work and I’d rather hire someone with a BSN than an ADN.

Not that there is anything wrong with other routes, and I really think it comes down to the position and setting you are referring to, but quite simply put those with the BSN have reached a higher level of nursing, have more experience, more schooling, a better and more advanced understanding, are prepared for advanced roles, and are in my opinion just better prepared all around.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Kerry1981 in Dallas, Texas

23 months ago

You still have an excellent chance to become a working RN with a associates degree in nursing. www.nursing-classes.info/nursing-programs/associate-degree-in-nursing/

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Jennifer_Z in Boothbay, Maine

23 months ago

Starting with an associates degree is a good way to go. You will obtain essential clinical skills starting in the first semester. I realize many hospitals are moving towards hiring BSN nurses but there are jobs out there for ADN nurses also. Once you start working you will be able to continue your education and obtain your BSN with experience. Some employers will reimburse your tuition after you pass college courses. Good luck!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Moon Starr in Odenton, Maryland

22 months ago

It's all about who you know to get a job...if you know a nurse manager or have friends that will recommend you, you have a better chance of getting a job.

There are very very few jobs for RNs with 2 year degrees. hospitals want "magnet status" especially in urban areas and they need approx 80% BSN degreed nurses on staff to apply for magnet rating. Nursing jobs for new grads and those with experience are few and far between. Nurse practitioner jobs are opening up but you need a masters and they always want "experience". Case Management has a lot of vacancies but they also want BSNs with a CCM certificate with experience. Having a BSN doesn't give you much of an advantage any longer to get bedside nursing jobs. If you want to advance your career to get a masters, then you need a BSN.

Don't let the schools or people on this forum fool you.....there are a lot more nurses than jobs available. Schools need to make money, so they tell nursing students they will have more job offers than they can handle, which is a lie.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

nurse ratchet in Columbus, Ohio

21 months ago

Depending on what direction you want to take your nursing career will warrent the level of education that you'll need. But keep in mind that with everyone encouraging higher education, you may educate yourself into a position of being "over qualified" and you'll find that no employer will pay you what you're worth. Eventually you may obtain a position that compensates you accordingly, eventually, but not usually right out of the gate. True schools need to make money, but so does everyone else, including you.
Yes, many hospitals want bsn's for the coveted sash of "magnet status" but when was the last time you needed hospital level care & said "oh I want to go to that hospital b/c it has "magnet" status"?
I will agree that bsn's have more academics, but it's my opinion that if you pit them next to a diploma rn or adn with about 2 yrs experience it's a close match. There are even some LPN's that I would entrust my care to over some nurses with the bsn, but that's me.
No matter what you hear about nursing shortages, no jobs or hiring freezes, or whatever...there are always, always going to be people in need of good, quality, compassionate nursing care which can and should be given at any & every level of nursing

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

cpj1186 in Phoenix, Arizona

21 months ago

Pony in El Paso, Texas said: I would love to be a nurse and can see myself going to school for four years. However I just don't see myself doing a four year program.

Do BDNs really get hired more than ADNs? Do I have a chance in this down job market?

you say u can go to school for 4 yrs, then say u cant see going for 4 yrs?? fyi---by 2020, most places will not hire a 2 yr degree nurse. You r wasting time thinking about it-get started asap.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

cpj1186 in Phoenix, Arizona

21 months ago

Moon Starr in Odenton, Maryland said: It's all about who you know to get a job...if you know a nurse manager or have friends that will recommend you, you have a better chance of getting a job.

There are very very few jobs for RNs with 2 year degrees. hospitals want "magnet status" especially in urban areas and they need approx 80% BSN degreed nurses on staff to apply for magnet rating. Nursing jobs for new grads and those with experience are few and far between. Nurse practitioner jobs are opening up but you need a masters and they always want "experience". Case Management has a lot of vacancies but they also want BSNs with a CCM certificate with experience. Having a BSN doesn't give you much of an advantage any longer to get bedside nursing jobs. If you want to advance your career to get a masters, then you need a BSN.

Don't let the schools or people on this forum fool you.....there are a lot more nurses than jobs available. Schools need to make money, so they tell nursing students they will have more job offers than they can handle, which is a lie.

you are absolutely right. one thing is, a lot of new nurses burn out fast, they think it is an easy way t make good money. It is not easy-it is very hard work. But if you love what you are doing it isn't hard at all. Most do not really like it enough to stay.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

cpj1186 in Phoenix, Arizona

21 months ago

Pony in El Paso, Texas said: Ooops, I meant to say I can see myself going for TWO years.... not four.

do yourself a favor & spend the extra time. it will pay off. no jobs other than bedside nursing are available to you. Way back I didn't think i would "really" be that way, I thought I would do fine & get any job I wanted, nope, not true.
btw-do not get in trouble with any nursing board-they will haunt you for the rest of your life, they do not go away and they make you feel worthless, easier to rob a bank and kidnap a bunch of orphans on the way out, at least the law gets over it---nursing boards do not. we have NO advocacy, I am trying to find ways to figure that out, to create some group somehow that could be helpful to nurses. For Pete sake... we are human beings, we are not robots, doesn't matter how good of a nurse you are-make a "mistake" in any area of your life, and you pay for it forever.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

cpj1186 in Phoenix, Arizona

21 months ago

To Moonstar: I agree, it does help to know someone, easier to move in a better direction. But at the end of the day, when you want to actually bring home the bigger bucks, if u do not have the degrees, you will never be paid for a higher position---esp if the person you knew who helped u advance moves on to another place---out u go---I learned that lesson the hard way--made awesome money for a year or 2, then this guy who knew that I was capable, got x-ferred. Bang! those greedy jealous ones jumped in and moved me right out of their path with the letters behind their name that I did not have..I'm feeling deserted, does it show? ;)

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

cpj1186 in Phoenix, Arizona

21 months ago

nurse ratchet in Columbus, Ohio said: Depending on what direction you want to take your nursing career will warrent the level of education that you'll need. But keep in mind that with everyone encouraging higher education, you may educate yourself into a position of being "over qualified" and you'll find that no employer will pay you what you're worth. Eventually you may obtain a position that compensates you accordingly, eventually, but not usually right out of the gate. True schools need to make money, but so does everyone else, including you.
Yes, many hospitals want bsn's for the coveted sash of "magnet status" but when was the last time you needed hospital level care & said "oh I want to go to that hospital b/c it has "magnet" status"?
I will agree that bsn's have more academics, but it's my opinion that if you pit them next to a diploma rn or adn with about 2 yrs experience it's a close match. There are even some LPN's that I would entrust my care to over some nurses with the bsn, but that's me.
No matter what you hear about nursing shortages, no jobs or hiring freezes, or whatever...there are always, always going to be people in need of good, quality, compassionate nursing care which can and should be given at any & every level of nursing

u r right---but at least need the bsn, after 2020 hosp will not hire adn's. it will not matter how compassionate, and kind u r. It is nuts, really. I know nurses w/master's degrees who know nothing, and adn;s who are the most amazing caregivers with more knowledge that all of the msn's combined. History will tell how insane this time period of nursing is; all the educ.letters, no advocacy, no continued education in most states, punishments for ridiculous, nonsensical issues.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

cpj1186 in Phoenix, Arizona

21 months ago

Jennifer_Z in Boothbay, Maine said: Starting with an associates degree is a good way to go. You will obtain essential clinical skills starting in the first semester. I realize many hospitals are moving towards hiring BSN nurses but there are jobs out there for ADN nurses also. Once you start working you will be able to continue your education and obtain your BSN with experience. Some employers will reimburse your tuition after you pass college courses. Good luck!

Jennifer---you are so right----if u have to have a job asap, starting with the adn will do fine, but if u hav time now- go for the bsn now.I am doing it now--20 years later. I am ready to not be on my feet for 12-14 hrs per shift. I have done my time--and love it, the system now is bad. I'm not in charge of making the rules, but there has got to be a better way. no help for nurses, and punitive boards that can't control the nurses under them anyway.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

cpj1186 in Phoenix, Arizona

21 months ago

SusanSuzanna in Fremont, California said: I know where you’re coming from; I didn’t have 4 years to sit around in a class either so I enrolled in the online RN to BSN from Unitek College .

The program was 18 months compared to 4 years. After I graduated and moved up in my job, I’m the one that makes the hiring decisions where I work and I’d rather hire someone with a BSN than an ADN.

Not that there is anything wrong with other routes, and I really think it comes down to the position and setting you are referring to, but quite simply put those with the BSN have reached a higher level of nursing, have more experience, more schooling, a better and more advanced understanding, are prepared for advanced roles, and are in my opinion just better prepared all around.

Susan---how did you like that program online? did u find it helpful? It is hard for me to be on the computer and focus. I am sure I'd figure it out---

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

» Sign in or create an account to comment on this topic.