Sales as a personal banker.

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Donna Hooker in Fort Worth, Texas

69 months ago

I routinely sell more than $1 million worth of credit union products monthly. Would any other personal bankers out there like to learn how I do it?

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Jenny in Bronx, New York

69 months ago

i am a recent college grad and im lookng to find a pb job...can u give me some tips and i would definately love to know how you do it

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Donna Hooker in Dallas, Texas

69 months ago

Hi, Jenny,

Thank you for your response. I, perhaps, made it sound as though there's a secret or a trick to selling $1 million worth of products per month over night. I apologize for misleading you and any other people who read this if I've done that.

Selling a million per month won't happen over night. I've been in banking and credit union work for thirty years, so experience is necessary. It's a combination of several things that, when combined, lead to a fulfilling sales career.

I will say that outstanding customer service, the kind that makes customers want only you as their personal banker, is the key to making repeat sales that put you over the million per month mark. I find it exciting, yet humbling, when clients are willing to sit in the lobby for two hours waiting for me to help them, while I'm working with another client.

That takes a tremendous amount of work...and patience, and in all of my years in the business, I've not known any other PBs who are willing to do the extra work to build a clientele who follows you from branch to branch if and when you change locations.

I'm considering writing an ebook on the subject and am wanting to find out if there's enough interest in this narrow niche to make writing the book worthwhile.

Once again, thanks for responding to this post, and I'd be happy to answer your questions the best I can if you have more.

Donna

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leeKah in Rapid City, South Dakota

67 months ago

Thanks, Donna for you interest in inspiring others

I am trying to find myself again in reminding myself that I like to help people;I do! ...let me explain: I have had a pretty bad customer service/ sales job experience and ever since I was there I feel as if I hit a wall. After listening to my husband who keeps telling me that I do not hate people, I have realized that perhaps my past experience has caused me to build this wall of negative thoughts in regards to helping others. I am currently seeking a job as a PB and your comments have been inspiring. The thought of being excited about having people waiting for you is so refreshing- my old train of negative thoughts would say "can't they just go away???" LOL Put in my personal life I am often delighted to help people; so why not at work?

How do you manage to keeo a positive attitude after a day of difficult (I mean, rude) customers???

Thanks again!

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Donna Hooker in Fort Worth, Texas

67 months ago

Hi, leeKah,

I know what you mean. I've read your post several times now, and I sense some frustration, maybe even a little desperation. Never fear; all is not lost.

What you've experienced is normal. And having a desire to help people is a necessity if you want to be a PB. Believe me, I, too, have the thought, "Can't they just go away"?, everyday. This is an issue that all PBs struggle with.

In a way, we should be thankful for those difficult (rude) people. If it weren't for them, we couldn't progress in our sales career. They sharpen us. Little by little, they teach us valuable people skills, something we all need in this business. Thankfully, all customers aren't like this.

I know in the heat of the moment, when they're screaming at us, all we want to do is tell them to "Shut up!" But we can't. We have to bite our tongues and smile. This is where our professionalism shines. First, I ask them why they're upset. Even though I'd rather be elsewhere, I sit there listening, searching for that bit of information, the key issue, causing their problem.

Second, once I determine their "real, underlying" problem, I explain to them what caused it and how we can go about fixing it. Granted, it's hard to make some customers understand what their real problem is. Many times they think it's something that is actually unrelated to their presenting problem.

Third, we have to be good "explainers." They don't understand the banking process from our perspective, so we have to explain it in such a way that they can understand it. We have to know the explanation process; we have to be able to explain complex banking concepts to, essentially, children. So, we not only have to know banking, but we also have to know the psychology associated with it.

I've discovered that once they understand their problem, their attitudes change, their voices drop to a normal range, and they generally become more civil. (I exercise a lot, too.)

Donna

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leeKah in Denver, Colorado

67 months ago

Thanks, for your reply Donna. Your posts have be so inspiring because, while most consider a PB a sales-oriented position, you seem to primarily focus on the customer service aspect of it, which in turn creates excellent sales opportunities for you.

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Sam Clark in Irvine, California

67 months ago

Donna,
How would you recommend I sell myself to Wells Fargo coming from the equipment financing area of business. I have an interview next week for personal banker.

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Charles Flynn in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

67 months ago

Donna Hooker in Fort Worth, Texas said: Hi, leeKa
once I determine their "real, underlying" problem, I explain to them what caused it and how we can go about fixing it. Granted, it's hard to make some customers understand what their real problem is. Many times they think it's something that is actually unrelated to their presenting problem.
Third, we have to be good "explainers." They don't understand the banking process from our perspective, so we have to explain it in such a way that they can understand it. We have to know the explanation process; we have to be able to explain complex banking concepts to, essentially, children. So, we not only have to know banking, but we also have to know the psychology associated with it.
I've discovered that once they understand their problem, their attitudes change, their voices drop to a normal range, and they generally become more civil. (I exercise a lot, too.)

Donna
May I simply say that your response was like a symphony of intelligence as it relates to customer service. My younger days I though, "If only there were no people, I would love this job!" You made a few that really stand out. Mainly, it is finding out the underlying problem. This is an art. It was one of the few Wells Chips they failed to implant: LOL. However, if you can master this art, "The Real Issue". You will just about be there. The other part is letting them vent while you are writing down their concerns. Let them know that is is important to you as much as them. It better be. Finally, if you are able to NOT take this home with you, you are there. Taking the time as you said to explain the banking system to them is also an art. They expect a spit and a handshake. Don't apologize, inform. They will respect you later, and that is what you want.

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Donna Hooker in Fort Worth, Texas

67 months ago

Hi, Sam,

Since I don't know you or your situation other than that you have an interview next week, it's hard for me to give you advice. I've never worked for Wells Fargo, so I don't know their hiring practices.

When I was a manager, I looked for sales experience, people skills, and reliability. Problem was, I never found all three traits in any one person.

If you have sales experience, then I would certainly stress that. Any is better than none; however, I've seen sales people from other industries enter this business and not do well. Being a sales person dealing directly with people's money is different from most other kinds of sales. As I've written, people get irate over their money, and they do it quickly! One Christmas I worked part-time in a men's clothing store as a sales person. Compared to PB sales, there was no stress.

If you are great with people, give examples to your interviewer. What kind of people skills do you have? Are you an extrovert or an introvert? How is your handshake? Strong or weak? These little things might seem insignificant, but they're not. If a customer needs your services at 4:50 p.m., and you close at 5:00, how would you respond? With a customer-centric attitude, you'd stay late and help however you could. Sometimes circumstances prevent you from staying late, but, in general, it's better to stay late and take care of your customer.

What will your previous employers say about your work record?
Are you reliable? Do you find excuses for going to work late or going home early? Do you have a family situation that would occasionally prevent you from working until closing time? Picking kids up from school? Taking the dog to the vet? Once again, these might seem trivial, but to a recruiter, an interviewer, and/or a manager, they're not. As a manager, I experienced all of these situations, and then some.

I hope I've not seemed too blunt. I wish you well, and please let us know how it goes.

Donna

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Donna Hooker in Fort Worth, Texas

67 months ago

Hi, Charles,

Thank you for your kind words. It'd be nice to be twenty years old and have fifty years of knowledge and experience. But since that's not possible, we have to learn as we go, and sometimes it seems to take forever.

I wish someone had sat me down and taught me these things thirty years ago when I entered this profession. That didn't happen. Maybe I can help others in this business or those who want to enter it.

Malcolm Gladwell wrote about tipping points. For me, there was a tipping point in my career, though I can't put my finger on exactly when that was. Almost from day one I've done very well at my present credit union, so maybe it was in 2000 when I started here.

It's something you can't see while you're living it. But after so many years in the business, learning and learning and learning, and then, all of a sudden, the tip occurs. Everything you've learned comes together and really starts to work for you. Sales, customer service, people skills, attitude, good listening skills, explanation ability, psychology, sociology, anthropology. It all seems to meld together. I can't speak for anyone else, but that's how it's been for me. Maybe I'm an anomaly. Maybe not.

When you're young you think time can't pass fast enough. Before you know it, that time has passed so quickly you can't believe it. So I guess to young people in this business, I say, "You can excel as a PB, just give it time. Be willing to learn from your own experiences, successes, mistakes, and failures and from those of others."

Thanks again for your kind words.

Donna

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hussain Iqbal in Sartell, Minnesota

67 months ago

Donna Hooker in Fort Worth, Texas said: I routinely sell more than $1 million worth of credit union products monthly. Would any other personal bankers out there like to learn how I do it?

hi i just had a phone intterview for personal banker with wells fargo recruiter on 10/08/08 and then a group interview with district director and branch manager on 10/10/08....i was wondering if some one can tell me when should i expect to hear from them ????? my inerview went good...the district manager told they will be leting me know by following tuseday....i have not heard from them yet....anyone can give me some advise....pls

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hussain Iqbal in Sartell, Minnesota

67 months ago

thanks a lot donna......actually i did a lot of reserch on wells fargo b4 i went for my interview....like where do they stand in the market.....their marger with vakovia and other stuff.....i talked about growth and a lot of positive stuff.....its just that when the district director tell u at the end of interview that i will know by cetain date about the decesion and then if u dont here from them it give an impression that people at such a level can be so unresponsible....i know what i mean...but i will keep my paitents...and yes i did sent a thank you email to both of them after the interview.

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leeKah in Denver, Colorado

67 months ago

Hussain, how was the group interview? How many people and what questions do they ask?? Thanks a lot for your help and Good Luck for you!

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hussain Iqbal in Sartell, Minnesota

67 months ago

The interview was with district director and the branch manager. Most of the questions were asked by the district director?questions like why wells fargo?.what motivates me?..my knowledge about wells fargo??my customer service skills?where do I see my self in 5 years and so ooon. I think I did a go job ?..i called the recruiter yesterday left a message and called today the branch manager and left a message for a feedback still no call back email or letter. as I was writing this email I received a phone call from the branch manager telling me that they have offer a position to a teller working with them for past 6 months. she said that they liked me a lot and want me to work as a part time teller to start with just to get the fell of the bank?.she wants me to think about it and call her back??any advise?..???????

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jay in Bronx, New York

67 months ago

hussain im in the same boat as you i went for a pb position with bank of america and they said they wanted more experience but they liked me so they offered me a fulltime teller positon in one of thier branches. this was a hard decision as am a recent grad but i took it to gain exp and hopefully i will get a better position eventually with the bank or somewhere else. i think ultimately your decision will be based on what you are doing now and your past experiences and what you are looking for but it wont hurt if you have nothing going on now

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jay in Bronx, New York

67 months ago

Hello Donna youre responses have been really great and helpful for me. i am a recent graduate and accepted a teller position just to get more experience in the banking center. i have a degree in economics and finance. ive only been doing it for a lil over 2 weeks but sometimes i struggle with it i feel like im capable of doing more. for me i love working with the customers and satisfying them that is why i feel i will be good for the pb positon im good at understanding ppls needs and steering them in the right direction. Back to the teller position i really do not enjoy doing the transactions it requires too much pressure and its just so much and i dont like the fact that you do the same thing over and over i feel like my creativity and independence as well as other skills i posses are not being utilized in my position as a teller.

so my question is do you think me being a teller will help me become a better pb or with what i told you will i fit the pb roll is it worth it for me to continue to work as a teller, for how long and what skills should i focus on building

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hussain Iqbal in Sartell, Minnesota

67 months ago

hi jay.... Yes I will go ahead and accept the offer to work as a part time teller and work my up?and proof my capabilities to them?..I think if they didn?t see the potential in me they would never have offered me the teller position. I have been working in the field of collections since past to years and love working with customers ?helping then with their problems and so oon. I think you can do the same proof your self to them ?.and get what you actually applied for a personal banker?.and work your way up. Just want to let you know at the end of my interview the branch manager asked where do u see your self five years from now?.i replied at your chair?.and I think they liked my answer a lot ?.i think people in the banking industry like people who believes in growth. Take care and best of luck?..in you carrier try to keep in touch.

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Diego in Brooklyn, New York

67 months ago

If I was you, I will not take the teller-position. I work for Commerce Bank which now is TD Bank, I was recently promoted to personal banker(customer service) from teller. I know someone who was working at Chase, he applied for Personal Banker and they told him to start as a teller and then he can move up within 6 months. Once the 6 months were up, they told him that he actually had to be a teller for at least 2 years. He quit and came over to Commerce Bank, which now is TD Bank. The best advice I can give you is apply for TD Bank(Commerce Bank), because I know many people who have come as tellers with the same situation.

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Donna Hooker in Fort Worth, Texas

66 months ago

Jay, I'll answer your question the best I can. As for continuing to work as a teller, I'd say, yes, it's worth it if you want to become a PB. You didn't state your age, but I'd guess you're in your mid-twenties. If I'm right, I'd say, "Give yourself some time." Be patient. Two weeks is not enough time to make career decisions.

Starting as a teller isn't a bad way to enter banking. Think of it as basic training for PBs. Let's take a look at a portion of what you'll be learning as a teller: First is customer relations. You'll learn how to greet customers, more often easier said than done. Second, maybe you have cash-handling experience. If not, tellering will teach you.

We know that handling cash and balancing your drawer are separate jobs, yet equally important. Hint: Never force-balance your drawer. Everywhere I've worked, forced balancing is grounds for termination. Don't risk it! Third, teller experience will provide you a foundation for more responsibility as a PB where your goals will be more complex and difficult to meet.

As for the length of time as a teller, it's hard for me to say since I don't know you. Too many variables in the equation prevent me from giving you a definite period of time. Your temperament, patience, background, attitude, desire to succeed, ability to work within your bank's system, and other variables will affect your climb up the ladder.

As for the skills you should work on building, I can't stress enough the customer service and customer relations skills. These are foundational to becoming a good PB. Get good at reading people, both by what they say and what they don't say. Learn how to read their body language. Learn excellent listening skills.

You probably want to move to a PB position now. If you get the chance, go for it, but do it for at least a couple of years. That way you'll know if PB work is right for you. If you don't get that chance soon, don't force it.

Take care,

Donna

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Bob in Salt Lake City, Utah

66 months ago

If you have a problem with starting out as a teller, try an in-store branch. That's where I got my start. I don't know about other banks, but US Bank In-Store branches are ful service branches where you get the teller and the banker experience all in one. It has helped me to become well rounded and I just got a job as a PB in one of our traditional branches. It can be easier, with no experience to start out that way. They do expect you to know how to sell, but the main priority of US Bank is customer service! I have learned so much in my position as an In-Store Banker. I think it is an excelent way to start where you don't feel like you're selling yourself short by accepting a teller position. Not that being a teller is a bad way to start either, but if you want to be a PB this is very helpful in getting you where you want to be in your career.

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michelle

66 months ago

Donna Hooker in Dallas, Texas said: Hi, Jenny,

Thank you for your response. I, perhaps, made it sound as though there's a secret or a trick to selling $1 million worth of products per month over night. I apologize for misleading you and any other people who read this if I've done that.

Selling a million per month won't happen over night. I've been in banking and credit union work for thirty years, so experience is necessary. It's a combination of several things that, when combined, lead to a fulfilling sales career.

I will say that outstanding customer service, the kind that makes customers want only you as their personal banker, is the key to making repeat sales that put you over the million per month mark. I find it exciting, yet humbling, when clients are willing to sit in the lobby for two hours waiting for me to help them, while I'm working with another client.

That takes a tremendous amount of work...and patience, and in all of my years in the business, I've not known any other PBs who are willing to do the extra work to build a clientele who follows you from branch to branch if and when you change locations.

I'm considering writing an ebook on the subject and am wanting to find out if there's enough interest in this narrow niche to make writing the book worthwhile.

Once again, thanks for responding to this post, and I'd be happy to answer your questions the best I can if you have more.

Donna

I would be so interested to hear how u accomplish 1mill a month!

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michelle

66 months ago

I just accepted a position as a personal banker and am so excited for the opportunity. I am focused on my goals as well as eager to sell. What tips would you have for me going in? What do you think are the keys to success in this economy? Any tips or comments would be appreciated.

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Peter in Parsippany, New Jersey

66 months ago

michelle said: I just accepted a position as a personal banker and am so excited for the opportunity. I am focused on my goals as well as eager to sell. What tips would you have for me going in? What do you think are the keys to success in this economy? Any tips or comments would be appreciated.

Hi Michelle, I too just accepted a PB position with JP Morgan Chase here in the Northern, NJ area. The starting base salary is $40,000. I would also like to know what the 'Keys" are to succeeding and "Exceeding" in this position. I am leaving my current job as a senior loan officer for a mortgage company/broker (100% commission)) for the safety of a base-salary and benefits package with Chase. Any tips or insider information that would help us excel at this position from Donna or anyone currently working as a PB would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

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Peter in Glen Burnie, Maryland

66 months ago

Hi Donna,

I also just accepted a PB position with JP Morgan Chase here in the northern, NJ area. The starting base salary they offered is $40,000. I would also like to know what the 'Keys" are to succeeding and "Excelling" in this position as a PB. I am leaving my current Sales job as a senior loan officer for a mortgage company/broker ( at 100% commission)) for the safety and security of a base-salary and benefits package with Chase since I am married with an 8-year child and the mortgage industry right now is too unstable and unpredictable. Any tips or insider information that would help me excel at this position from would be greatly appreciated. I don't believe it's much of a leap going from selling mortgage to seeling bank products. Thanks.

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Donna Hooker in Fort Worth, Texas

66 months ago

Hi, Michelle and Peter,

Congratulations to both of you for getting PB positions. You both sound eager to get started. That's great! Of the positions I've held in banking over the past three decades, my job as a PB has been the best.

Succeeding and exceeding as a PB depends on more variables than I can write about here. As I've written before, you should give yourself a fair deal, that is, give it time. You'll need to give it your best effort for at least a year, preferably two if possible, before making any decisions on whether you should stay or enter some other line of work.

Again, I can't stress enough the customer service aspect of this job and a positive attitude. They, alone, will take you a long way toward success. Always put your customer before yourself. Many times I've taken late lunches or skipped lunch all together to provide service to customers who needed or requested me specifically. I don't enjoy missing lunch and I don't advise anyone to do it, but it's something I've done in the past to help my customers.

About the economy, it doesn't look good right now. I was way off in October. $730,000 was all I could do, and November's not looking much better. Perhaps entering the PB profession at this time is a good move. The slow economy might make you work harder, so when things improve you'll be ahead of the game.

For me, one key to success has been to "learn something new everyday" about your job. It doesn't have to be anything Earth-shattering. It can be something as simple as learning that one of your customer's cousins lives one block down from you. Or it might be something as complicated as a new law Congress has made regarding banking. But make it your mantra to learn something new everyday.

Keep your questions coming. I'll do my best to provide quality answers based on my experience in banking.

Donna

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leeKah in Denver, Colorado

65 months ago

hussain Iqbal in Sartell, Minnesota said: hi jay.... Yes I will go ahead and accept the offer to work as a part time teller and work my up?and proof my capabilities to them?..I think if they didn?t see the potential in me they would never have offered me the teller position. I have been working in the field of collections since past to years and love working with customers ?helping then with their problems and so oon. I think you can do the same proof your self to them ?.and get what you actually applied for a personal banker?.and work your way up. Just want to let you know at the end of my interview the branch manager asked where do u see your self five years from now?.i replied at your chair?.and I think they liked my answer a lot ?.i think people in the banking industry like people who believes in growth. Take care and best of luck?..in you carrier try to keep in touch.

Thanks for the info on the interview...

do you know the reason why they didn't offer you the PB position? just wondering... Hope things are working out for you...

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John in Fremont, California

65 months ago

Donna Hooker in Fort Worth, Texas said: I routinely sell more than $1 million worth of credit union products monthly. Would any other personal bankers out there like to learn how I do it?

Hi Donna, in the years that you've been in this position, what are some of the highest earnings you've witnessed accomplished by PBs? Also I have about 3 years of software sales experience but none in banking. Realisticly do you think I can ask for a base of $60k as a beginner or is this a pipe dream?

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lwells in Oakland, California

65 months ago

Donna Hooker in Fort Worth, Texas said: I routinely sell more than $1 million worth of credit union products monthly. Would any other personal bankers out there like to learn how I do it?

Yes, I would like to know how you do it.
I am not a personal banker but have an interview and hope to become one soon.

Thank you in advance and Happy Holidays to you and your family!

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ewelyn in Toronto, Ontario

65 months ago

Hi Donna, I live in Toronto and a had today the phone interwiev for PBO Trenee in Scotiabank. She said that she will call me when i have the interwiev, if you can give me some tips and info I wlii be very thankful...
Egzamle question...
I'm in Canada 5 yr, so my English isn't perfect and that is the worst thing I'm worried of :( I finished Canadian Securities Course (CSI) and rightnow I'm doing the Proffesional Finnancial Planning Course at CSI....

and "I'm considering writing an ebook on the subject and am wanting to find out if there's enough interest in this narrow niche to make writing the book worthwhile "
did you finish it ???

thanks

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Game Chicken in Vancouver, British Columbia

62 months ago

I have people telling me PB is nothing but an glorified teller. What is so good about this position where you're tying to sell products that people don't need?

I work as a teller and I hate it. I can't even get referrals cause no customer wants anything.

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Robert Mullins in Maumee, Ohio

62 months ago

I'm in the process of interviewing at 5/3 bank for a retail pb. I've already interviewed with the branch manager and I have a second interview with the regional manager next week. The branch manager gave me a heads up on a very important question. It's a simple question but one that I really never put much thought into and I'm not sure how to answer: Why banking? so..... why do I want to be a personal banker? I'm looking for the perfect answer to this question. I want this job more than you could imagine. I've been a 100% commission sales professional for over 15 yrs. The auto industry is taking a huge beating right now. I support a family of 5. I've made a mid to high 6 figure income for the last 6 yrs and in 2008 dropped to low 40s. I need stability so a salaried job in customer service seems like it would be a good fit for me. I don't want that to be my answer to the question: Why banking? How do I answer that question to get this job? I need to get back to taking care of my family!! Your advice is greatly appreciated! Thank you.

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Musica in Mississauga, Ontario

62 months ago

Donna Hooker in Fort Worth, Texas said: I routinely sell more than $1 million worth of credit union products monthly. Would any other personal bankers out there like to learn how I do it?

Hi Donna,

I just landed a PBO position with Scotiabank and will be starting in 2 months, as soon as I graduate. I was wondering if you could tell me more about the training process, how much knoledge about mutual funds do I have to have prior to starting the position?
Also, I would highly appreciate if you can give me some pointers on how to make succesful phone sales.

Thank You

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Shawn in Singapore

59 months ago

Donna Hooker in Fort Worth, Texas said: Hi, Michelle and Peter,

Congratulations to both of you for getting PB positions. You both sound eager to get started. That's great! Of the positions I've held in banking over the past three decades, my job as a PB has been the best.

Succeeding and exceeding as a PB depends on more variables than I can write about here. As I've written before, you should give yourself a fair deal, that is, give it time. You'll need to give it your best effort for at least a year, preferably two if possible, before making any decisions on whether you should stay or enter some other line of work.

Again, I can't stress enough the customer service aspect of this job and a positive attitude. They, alone, will take you a long way toward success. Always put your customer before yourself. Many times I've taken late lunches or skipped lunch all together to provide service to customers who needed or requested me specifically. I don't enjoy missing lunch and I don't advise anyone to do it, but it's something I've done in the past to help my customers.

About the economy, it doesn't look good right now. I was way off in October. $730,000 was all I could do, and November's not looking much better. Perhaps entering the PB profession at this time is a good move. The slow economy might make you work harder, so when things improve you'll be ahead of the game.

For me, one key to success has been to "learn something new everyday" about your job. It doesn't have to be anything Earth-shattering. It can be something as simple as learning that one of your customer's cousins lives one block down from you. Or it might be something as complicated as a new law Congress has made regarding banking. But make it your mantra to learn something new everyday.

Keep your questions coming. I'll do my best to provide quality answers based on my experience in banking.

Donna

Please come out with your book. I will be your 1st customer.

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madame rose in Torrance, California

59 months ago

Listening to all your stories and experiences really helps me to prep for my group interview. I live in Torrance, CA and and im applying for a PB position at Wells Fargo. I come from an entertainment industry background, so when i had the phone interview i was surprised that the rep passed me on to the next step, the group interview. My concern is i have no banking or finance experience; my degree is in liberal arts and i was an editor for reality tv. My sales experience was 8 years ago in a dept store selling shoes. I would just like to know straight up am i being snowballed just for interview sakes? So many of you on here have actually degrees and backgrounds in finance and you still get denied,-no offense- but what chances, realistically, does someone have getting a PB position without a "proven track record" of sales in a former job or a background in finance?

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Kimletitgo in Boise, Idaho

50 months ago

This message is for Donna Hooker

I am interested in your ebook. I hope you have decided to write it. The comments you made on this site helped me get the job at Chase and I would love to hear more so that I succeed.

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Ben in Temple, Texas

49 months ago

I for one would be interested in your book. I've just been hired as a personal banker and could use someone's expertise in the industry. I worked for Fidelity as a trader previously but PB will be a completely different "ball-game" I'm sure.

Donna Hooker in Dallas, Texas said: Hi, Jenny,

Thank you for your response. I, perhaps, made it sound as though there's a secret or a trick to selling $1 million worth of products per month over night. I apologize for misleading you and any other people who read this if I've done that.

Selling a million per month won't happen over night. I've been in banking and credit union work for thirty years, so experience is necessary. It's a combination of several things that, when combined, lead to a fulfilling sales career.

I will say that outstanding customer service, the kind that makes customers want only you as their personal banker, is the key to making repeat sales that put you over the million per month mark. I find it exciting, yet humbling, when clients are willing to sit in the lobby for two hours waiting for me to help them, while I'm working with another client.

That takes a tremendous amount of work...and patience, and in all of my years in the business, I've not known any other PBs who are willing to do the extra work to build a clientele who follows you from branch to branch if and when you change locations.

I'm considering writing an ebook on the subject and am wanting to find out if there's enough interest in this narrow niche to make writing the book worthwhile.

Once again, thanks for responding to this post, and I'd be happy to answer your questions the best I can if you have more.

Donna

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Luke Beyer in Colorado Springs, Colorado

47 months ago

Please keep this post going. This is great information. I was just hired as a PB for WF. I came from auto sales and was a top producer, but wanted something with stability and a future. I hope that you write and publish your book. I was beatin to the punch on being first in line for it, but I will be second. Please let me know what information I can seek out prior to starting this position. I have a week and a half where I can be educating myself and would like to utilize it. Any information would be helpful.

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LLCHRI in Tampa, Florida

46 months ago

Does any one know if a married couple can both be personal bankers within the same district?

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sovie7972 in Los Gatos, California

36 months ago

Hi Donna,

I am actually a Teller and would like to become a Personal Banker. I am waiting for the recruiter call me and schedule an interview pretty soon. I would love having your advice regarding sales and services. I can provide an excellent customer service to a lots of customer but cannot stand rude customers. I am out control with rude customer. How can I deal with that because it stress me out a lots.

D'avance, Thank you

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Darren in Markham, Ontario

25 months ago

Hi, anyone know what is the starting salary for a full time retail banking officer at Scotiabank?

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