B.S. vs. Master's

Get new comments by email
You can cancel email alerts at anytime.
Comments (1 to 50 of 56)
Page:   1  2  Next »   Last »

Rick in Upland, California

68 months ago

Hi,

I'm looking at becoming a PA and was wondering if anyone could advise me on whether or not a Master's degree is required. I'm looking at a school that offers a B.S. and don't know if that's enough anymore (of course, the school says it is but for all I know they're just trying to increase the number of applicants they have). Any help would be appreciated.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Rick in Upland, California

67 months ago

Thanks for the advice. Now I have a somewhat embarrassing question to ask: I completed my undergraduate degree at UCI but due to a lack of dedication I left teh school with a 2.498 GPA. I know that it's not a competitive GPA at all and was wondering if I could get some pointers as to how to make myself more competitive. Part of the reason behind my lack of dedication to my undergraduate degree was because of the amount of time I dedicated to my EMT job. Is there anything I can do to still get into a master's program?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Sara in Claremont, California

67 months ago

Rick in Upland, California said: Thanks for the advice. Now I have a somewhat embarrassing question to ask: I completed my undergraduate degree at UCI but due to a lack of dedication I left teh school with a 2.498 GPA. I know that it's not a competitive GPA at all and was wondering if I could get some pointers as to how to make myself more competitive. Part of the reason behind my lack of dedication to my undergraduate degree was because of the amount of time I dedicated to my EMT job. Is there anything I can do to still get into a master's program?

do you have all the pre-req, if not improve your GPA by doing well in those grades. On the aplicatiion it calculate a seperate GPA for the pre-req. Since you are an EMT thats going to be strong on your aplication. But Remember GPA is very important and if you could raise it to 3.1-3.3 that will really help.
Good Luck
Sarah PAC

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

T in Los Angeles, California

67 months ago

Get more experience. Volunteer if you are not an EMT anymore. Get rocking letters of recommendation. Do good in your pre-reqs or even take them over if they're finished. Some schools like Western will take the better grade or other schools will combine the two grades. Take other classes at the community college and bring up that GPA.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

LesH

65 months ago

Thanks for all of the advice. My pre-req grades are pretty decent but I still have a quite a few of them to go. Sarah, based on your experience as a PA-C do you think a B.S. in PA would be enough to find a job in CA?

Rick in California, 10% of the PA programs are at the BS level, 40% are at the Certificate/AS level and the remaining 50% are at the MS level. The majority of the current PA workforce in California hold a certificate as the academic credential awarded from their PA program. What you need to get a job in California is the PA-C and a license. I've been a PA in Cali for 22 years and have done well with a certificate.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (9) / No Reply - Report abuse

LesH

65 months ago

T in Los Angeles, California said: In California PA programs that offer less than a Masters degree are starting to be phased out./QUOTE]

Actually, this is incorrect. The AS and Certificate programs are doing very well and none are being phased out. Their graduates are doing well in the job market and the programs are recieving state and national recognition for their sucesses. They make up 40% of the training programs. Phasing them out would make it even more difficult to become a PA in California. FWIW.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Rick in Pomona, California

65 months ago

I was wondering if anyone knew how badly repeating a course a few times looked on applications. Is it just the final grade that matters or do schools look at all grades in a course?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

kelly in Riverside, California

64 months ago

Rick in Upland, California said: Thanks for the advice. Now I have a somewhat embarrassing question to ask: I completed my undergraduate degree at UCI but due to a lack of dedication I left teh school with a 2.498 GPA. I know that it's not a competitive GPA at all and was wondering if I could get some pointers as to how to make myself more competitive. Part of the reason behind my lack of dedication to my undergraduate degree was because of the amount of time I dedicated to my EMT job. Is there anything I can do to still get into a master's program?

OMG! I have the same problem as you! From UCI too..lol I wish I can go back in time..but right now, all I can do is re-take the classes and volunteer more.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Nayrn12 in Meridian, Mississippi

63 months ago

I would love to go to PA School, but I'm 46 y/o without a BS degree. I have been an RN for 15 years (have an ADN) with experience in multiple areas. I have an approx. GPA of 3.5 & have been taking pre-reqs for a BSN program, but I'm still not done with those to get in yet. I'd rather spend the next 2 years working on both, PA school & finish with a BS. Do they have such a program? Where? Help!!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (5) / No Reply - Report abuse

Rick in Diamond Bar, California

63 months ago

There are some B.S. programs that give you both the degree and the cert. The only one I know of for sure is Howard University's program. However, if you just search online I'm sure you'll find more programs. The great thing about Howard is that you could probably apply now and finish your pre-reqs at school and then apply for their PA program during your final two years.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

LesH in Kerman, California

59 months ago

Rick in Diamond Bar, California said: There are some B.S. programs that give you both the degree and the cert. The only one I know of for sure is Howard University's program. However, if you just search online I'm sure you'll find more programs. The great thing about Howard is that you could probably apply now and finish your pre-reqs at school and then apply for their PA program during your final two years.

Drew PA program does this as well or at least they used to.

LesH

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

LesH in Kerman, California

59 months ago

LesH in Kerman, California said: Drew PA program does this as well or at least they used to.

LesH

My bad I meant to say a BS or a Cert if you already had the BS. Sorry

LesH

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Raquel Yu in Irvine, California

51 months ago

I am graduating from UCI with a BA in biological sciences, and I want to get into a PA program, but I don't know which one to choose. What is the difference between getting a certificate or a master's for a PA program?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

LesH in Los Angeles, California

51 months ago

In California if you apply to a non MS program most applicants have at least 2000 hours of clinical experience.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

LesH in Los Angeles, California

51 months ago

Raquel Yu in Irvine, California said: I am graduating from UCI with a BA in biological sciences, and I want to get into a PA program, but I don't know which one to choose. What is the difference between getting a certificate or a master's for a PA program?

Both let you sit for the PANCE, and if you pass both will allow you a license in CA. As far as coursework, the MS programs tend to be longer by a month or in one case longer. The MS programs may include a thesis or capstone project. You have to look at each program you are interested in applying carefully.
Good luck in your future PA endeavors
LesH
Goo

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Kristine in Los Angeles, California

50 months ago

Hi everyone. I am about to attend National University for my BA so that i can try to apply at Western University for my masters in physician assistant. I am also wondering if I should just go to riverside community college and skip the whole bachlors and masters and just stick with the certificate for Physician assistant????? Help pleaseeeeee.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

penguin7 in Cherry Hill, New Jersey

50 months ago

Hi I will be graduating from ungergrad this May with a 3.1 overall and a 3.0 science gpa. I know this is not good enough for pa school so I was thinking of doing a post bac or 1 yr of masters to show I will be able to handle upper level science courses? Has anyone done this or have any advice on what I should do? Thanks!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Helen in La Jolla, California

50 months ago

Hi I was wondering if there is a specific bachelor's degree that PA programs are looking for. I go to UCSD and the biology department is impacted, making it extremely hard to switch to the bio major. Anything would be helpful. Thank you!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

TEE1987 in Toms River, New Jersey

42 months ago

I just recieved an invite for an interview at Hofstra Univ. They have a BS/MS program So i could choose to graduate and get my BS or take additioanl courses and get my MS as stated above. I was wondering if anyone knows the states that do not allow you to practice with just a BS even having passed the PANCE. ? i think its Mississippi and Ohio... but just double checking.

Thanks for the advice in advance.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

Future PA student in NY in Elmont, New York

34 months ago

Helen in La Jolla, California said: Hi I was wondering if there is a specific bachelor's degree that PA programs are looking for. I go to UCSD and the biology department is impacted, making it extremely hard to switch to the bio major. Anything would be helpful. Thank you!

PA schools really do not care what your degree is in as long as the pre-reqs are done and with good grades. I finished my BS in technology studies, a degree that allowed me to complete the pre-reqs w/o loosing any credits. My final GPA was a 3.43 and I have interviewed at only 3 or 7 programs I applied to. I was wait listed at one, which is a BS program CUNY York College in NY and does not use CASPA and it looks like I might get an offer from another BS/MS Touro College in NY. This is a long painful process but stick to your guns and keep those grades up... Being a science major you have a greater chance of messing up you GPA, and keep in mind the UG major accepted into med school the most last year was english...

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Future PA student in NY in Elmont, New York

34 months ago

So there is a chance I might get into two PA schools.

1. a BS program at a state university where the cost is about $2500/semester and the school does not use CASPA.

2. a BS/MS program at a private university where the total cost will be around $70K for the 24mo program and the school is on CASPA.

Is the extra debt worth getting the masters degree?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (10) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

Depressed & Hopeless Soul

30 months ago

Rick in Upland, California said: Thanks for the advice. Now I have a somewhat embarrassing question to ask: I completed my undergraduate degree at UCI but due to a lack of dedication I left teh school with a 2.498 GPA. I know that it's not a competitive GPA at all and was wondering if I could get some pointers as to how to make myself more competitive. Part of the reason behind my lack of dedication to my undergraduate degree was because of the amount of time I dedicated to my EMT job. Is there anything I can do to still get into a master's program?

Hi Rick! I might be in a similar situation when I graduate. I have a 1.5 - 2 years left for my degree at UCD and project a 2.9 GPA. But I'm withdrawing for a year to take my pre-reqs and refocus myself (I expect to do really well on pre-req GPA). My major is in Agriculture & Enviromental Education and I haven't done well because I was confused the whole time as to what I wanted to do. Now I know! But I feel like a complete failure and that I've blown any chance I have at ever becoming a PA. I'll have about 3 years of experience as a CNA by the time I attempt to apply to a PA school.

I'm hoping for good news from you that you were able to get into a PA program or even graduate school. Please let me know how things went. Or if anyone got into a PA program with very low GPA's I would love to hear from you. This will really lift my spirits!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Sam8nj in Kearny, New Jersey

27 months ago

Guys I need help please specially from those who are already PA's and have experience in the field-- I have been researching on this topic for the past weeks, have called PA association in NJ & NY, etc, but NOONE gives me a clear answer.. I have a BA in Biology graduated last year and have applied for some MS and BS pa programs in New York since Jersey only has two MS programs.. anyway if i do get interview for any of these, at the time of deciding where to go (MS or BS), i want to know what is the difference between practicing as a PA with a BS or MS degree. I know that all these programs are accredited and have the same time of curriculum and each give certification, but degree is different. But Im wondering when looking at Sophie Davis(BS) comparing it to for example Touro college that offers an MS degree, the tuition difference is huge... WHen I asked why they told me everything is the same, but i dont know, i mean if there is such a difference in tuition then there most be a reason... Im scared that if I do the BS program, once i become certified and graduate, once I look for a job i may get a lower pay or I dont know.. I know there has to be a difference. I know NY state allows BS and MS PA to practice, however Im not sure about NJ.. anyone know?? regardless of what it is I need to know what the difference is before I make a decision if i do get accepted.. Please guys help me out im confused. I know some will ask why I am going for a BS in PA if i already have a BA degree, but the BA programs caught my attention in that their tuition is cheaper and also main reason i applied to those is because deadline for these are usually later in the year, i was kinda late for the MS programs.. HELP HELP HELP. I will greatly appreciate your time and honesty...

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

sadie in Chester, Connecticut

27 months ago

Masters programs can have more qualified teachers/instructors. In terms of getting a job, while there are a few differences, you can get a job with a bachelors or a masters in most states. There might be subtle differences in in where you can branch off to. Example, if you want to get into administration or health policy, or lead a committee, you may need a masters.

Programs that offer a masters can sometimes be a little more well rounded than bachelors programs. There might be better student support, mentors, shadowing programs, advisors, teacher access, etc.

Masters programs usually have better graduation rates, higher PANCE pass rates, etc. It can be a little more competitive to get into a masters program, so it's usually a result of the students themselves being more qualified, and the program itself being more supportive of the students.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Jaimie in Owings Mills, Maryland

25 months ago

In Maryland, will it be required 3 years from now that graduates of physician assistant programs have a masters degree with them? Will bachelor graduates be able to find a job in 3 years?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

sara1234 in Maine

25 months ago

Jaimie in Owings Mills, Maryland said: In Maryland, will it be required 3 years from now that graduates of physician assistant programs have a masters degree with them? Will bachelor graduates be able to find a job in 3 years?

Of course they will. I know why you are concerned, but here is the truth. Once you have graduated from ANY accredited PA Program that qualifies you to take the PA board examinations (unless they are located in some crazy island off the coast of Africa, they will)... you will be eligible to practice as a PA in the United States. This being said, at some point in your PA career you may find it beneficial (financially, especially) to take the extra classes and get your Masters. BUT, no law will ever strip your right to work as a PA with a bachelor's degree once you've already earned it. PLUS... once you become a PA, you can always get your masters later.
Bottom line is this: you will NOT go to a PA school that ends up being pointless in the end. No matter what the program (assuming it is a genuine program licensed by the U.S, of course), assuming you pass it & then pass your board exam, you will not be out of a job.
I hope this helps. Let me know if by chance I didn't answer you question adequately.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (7) / No Reply - Report abuse

Patricia in Buena Park, California

24 months ago

I am starting at Azusa Pacific this fall under their Applied Health major with an emphasis in P.A. I was talking to a friend from my current junior college and he thinks that with this degree I would be allowed to take the PANCE. Does anyone have any information in regards to this type of degree? thank you.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

un2gsus in Beaumont, California

21 months ago

Rick in Upland, California said: Hi,

I'm looking at becoming a PA and was wondering if anyone could advise me on whether or not a Master's degree is required. I'm looking at a school that offers a B.S. and don't know if that's enough anymore (of course, the school says it is but for all I know they're just trying to increase the number of applicants they have). Any help would be appreciated.

I know Riverside Community College is offering an Associates degree with a follow-on Masters program through some east coast school.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Aspiring PA in Maspeth, New York

20 months ago

Future PA student in NY in Elmont, New York said: So there is a chance I might get into two PA schools.

1. a BS program at a state university where the cost is about $2500/semester and the school does not use CASPA.

2. a BS/MS program at a private university where the total cost will be around $70K for the 24mo program and the school is on CASPA.

Is the extra debt worth getting the masters degree?

What did you decide? I'm in the same boat right now, and I'm just not sure whats the best move...I'm either going to do the BS with City College or the BS/MS with Touro.. Anyone with experience with either of these programs, please write me some info on your thoughts.. If everyone is allowed to practice as a PA with either a bachelors or masters then what are the perks of the masters? Do PA's with a Bachelors have a harder time trying to find a job?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

un2gsus in Beaumont, California

20 months ago

Aspiring PA in Maspeth, New York said: What did you decide? I'm in the same boat right now, and I'm just not sure whats the best move...I'm either going to do the BS with City College or the BS/MS with Touro.. Anyone with experience with either of these programs, please write me some info on your thoughts.. If everyone is allowed to practice as a PA with either a bachelors or masters then what are the perks of the masters? Do PA's with a Bachelors have a harder time trying to find a job?

I am going to contact the school directly and talk with the director. I might find some answers there and I will let you know.
send me your email and I will follow-up with you.

Dan

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Aspiring Pa

20 months ago

I don't think they let you post emails on here. But definitely post the info up on this site for everyone's benefit :) I am excited to hear what you find out

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

un2gsus in Beaumont, California

19 months ago

Which City College do you plan on attending?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Aspiring Pa

19 months ago

City College of New York

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

un2gsus in Beaumont, California

19 months ago

You must be single and can pull up routes easily. Not me!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Aspiring Pa

19 months ago

I don't understand what you mean by pulling up routed easily. I'm married and live in NYC.. So city college of New York is a good option for me. I am solely concerned about BS or MS

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

un2gsus in Beaumont, California

19 months ago

I thought your profile stated you were in Ontario, California. Oops! My bad.
Enjoy your schooling. You might call the PA boards of NY and see if your course will qualify for testing and licensing.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

GoGetter in East Peoria, Illinois

19 months ago

Is there a listing of BS PA programs and which states will allow a bachelor's level Pa to practice?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

un2gsus in Beaumont, California

19 months ago

We have out here in California two programs that are Associates programs, and they qualify to set the boards. One is a Community College and the other is a Vocational College awarding an Associates Degree.

The Community College is $5,000 and the Vocational College is $52,000. All others are requiring a bachelors and cost $110,000, where you get a masters.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

GoGetter in East Peoria, Illinois

19 months ago

From what I've read and understand there's no strict educational requirement in Illinois to become a PA. But I do know that boards have a way to play games with those deemed to have not jumped through all the fiery hoops in place to protect their profession. I'd love to be able to take an AAS program and sit for the boards in my state. I know AAS level PAs in IL. but they got their degrees years ago.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

un2gsus in Beaumont, California

19 months ago

I just visited an Urgent Care and talked with the PA. She attended the very same school I mentioned in Riverside California. An AAS in Physician Assistants; she said she did not need to go any further in her education, because it did not increase her pay or status any. She also said it was very intense for her only having an EMT with Emergency Room experience for 3.5 years.

Go figure, if someone has 50,000 hrs experience like myself it should be a breeze to complete. My history of being a Aerospace Rescueman/Military Medic (Vietnam Era), Paramedic, Vocational Nurse, and a Registered Respiratory Therapist for 23 years. I missed challenging the California RN boards by 5 years and the PA boards by 10 years; I am getting paid for my respiratory knowledge, but not my teaching ability when I teach and have taught the young Doctors at the University Hospital.

So, I am not embarrassed to say, I will jump at this chance to show my skills. I might even get credit for tutoring the respiratory systems while in school.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Emergency Medicine PA in Redlands, California

17 months ago

Unfortunately a lot of the information on this thread is either anecdotal and incorrect or based on old information. it is actually a requirement for PAs to have a masters level education as of january 1st 2020. Several years ago the ARC-PA, which is the accrediting agency for physician assistant programs, decided to no longer grant accreditation to schools not offering a masters level education. Furthermore, these schools that were "grandfathered" in to their accreditation are required to offer a masters degree by 2020 or they will be shut down. Such is the case with riverside community college (RCC) in california. RCC either has to associate itself with a university and require a bachelors degree for entrance by 2020 or face de-accreditation.

Historically there were many non master level program for PA certification, but this is by far a thing of the past as 94% of PA schools in the nation confer a master's degree at the present time. Obtaining anything less than a Master's degree puts you at a disadvantage as healthcare organizations are jumping on board with this and requiring that PAs have Masters Level PA training for employment.

This is what is best for the PA profession as it creates a standardized level of education and removes "short-cut" schools like RCC from competition.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (7) / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

GoGetter in East Peoria, Illinois

17 months ago

I'd like to know if one can practice in Illinois with a BA or certificate level program?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

DoItTheRightWay in Santa Ana, California

17 months ago

GoGetter in East Peoria, Illinois said: I'd like to know if one can practice in Illinois with a BA or certificate level program?

If you were really a "go getter" you wouldn't be asking that question. You would be asking where the nearest Masters PA program was.

Being a PA should not be a short cut to a higher income. If someone is passionate about the profession then a Master's degree should be the goal. Help add prestige and credibility to the profession. Do not take a shortcut by settling for something less.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

P Johanna in Fontana, California

17 months ago

DoItTheRightWay in Santa Ana, California said: If you were really a "go getter" you wouldn't be asking that question. You would be asking where the nearest Masters PA program was.

Being a PA should not be a short cut to a higher income. If someone is passionate about the profession then a Master's degree should be the goal. Help add prestige and credibility to the profession. Do not take a shortcut by settling for something less.

Ouch! .... I mean Wow!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

GoGetter in East Peoria, Illinois

16 months ago

DoItTheRightWay in Santa Ana, California said: If you were really a "go getter" you wouldn't be asking that question. You would be asking where the nearest Masters PA program was.

Being a PA should not be a short cut to a higher income. If someone is passionate about the profession then a Master's degree should be the goal. Help add prestige and credibility to the profession. Do not take a shortcut by settling for something less.

Wow....so much anger. Please let it out. You'll feel much better.

Unlike some I have no need for an academic to validate my life. If one can practice as a PA with a baccalaureate level program then why not explore that option? I know PAs with nothing more than an AAS who are quite competent in what they do.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

DoItTheRightWay in Corona, California

16 months ago

Don't try to project your feeling of inadequacy as anger on my part. There is no anger in my position. This is a movement by the PA profession to require all PA schools to confer a master's degree upon completion by 2020. The PA profession is trying to standardize the education expectation that the public has for the person making their medical decisions. You cannot dispute that the public at large would prefer a practitioner with higher education over lower levels of education when given the choice. After all, they are expecting the see "the Doctor."

Moving forward, if one is planning to become a PA and knows that the ARC-PA, PAC, and AAPA are requesting that you get a master's degree and you choose otherwise then you are taking advantage of a loophole yet to be closed and are hurting the profession.

This is not to say that there aren't excellent PAs in practice that only possess an AS degree or simply certification. After all 10-15 years ago these schools were the only game in town. However, the tide had changed. Getting an AS or BS now will leave you in the vast minority of PAs in 5-10 years. I have first hand knowledge of multiple job openings that require accredited Master's level training. Secure you're own future and do it the right way now.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

GoGetter in East Peoria, Illinois

16 months ago

Projecting much? I have no feelings of inadequacy at all. Standardize the education? Possibly, but more likely they're doing the same thing as nurses do for their NPs which is require higher and higher barriers of entry into the field to protect their profession. The right way? If one can still gain entry with a BA/BS program then yes it is a loophole worth exploring. Hurting the profession? Not hardly as long as one is competent at their job. No need to get your g-string in a bunch.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

DoItTheRightWay in Corona, California

16 months ago

When it comes to patient's expectations, respect from colleagues/nurses/hospital admin, and compensation, PA education level is a factor. The PA professional organizations agree otherwise they would not have created the standard. The ARCPA is giving non compliant PA programs time to comply. That is why the option to attend a certificate/AS/BS program is still available however these programs are quickly becoming a thing of the past as they try to conform or become extinct. Do you want to be a part of PA history or PA present and future?

The writing is on the wall you can read it or choose to ignore it. But, don't try to make this a personal argument. Just because you don't qualify for or "want" to attend a master's program doesn't mean you should spin attending a lower educational level program as a good idea or "just as good".

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (6) Reply - Report abuse

P Johanna in Fontana, California

16 months ago

Key word patient expectations (bed side manners) and respect, you have lacked both. If you are a PA you demonstrated less than what you have responded on this thread. Embarrassing.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

DoItTheRightWay in Corona, California

16 months ago

P Johanna in Fontana, California said: Key word patient expectations (bed side manners) and respect, you have lacked both. If you are a PA you demonstrated less than what you have responded on this thread. Embarrassing.

Now that's just silly. I'm sorry that this information doesn't fit into your paradigm, but its factual information that prospective PA students need. Don't steer them wrong based on your need to rationalize your lack of formal education. The simple fact that this info sparks such visceral responses from people on this thread is telling. I've made my point. If you are a prospective PA student please hear this advice and ignore the PAs on this thread who are trying to tell you it's ok to take advantage of temporary educational loopholes. Do It The Right Way.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Page:   1  2  Next »   Last »

» Sign in or create an account to comment on this topic.