secretary job description

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

66 months ago

My questions is how to measure effectiveness of secretary position?

I know. From what I have seen in the legal field, effectiveness is based on whether or not the person she works for complains about her (sad, but true).

I've seen a few secretaries who were great, but the attorney she worked for didn't like her, so he did nothing but complain.

I've worked with several secretaries who did as littl as they could get away with doing, but they worked with someone who was extremely easy going - so all the undone stuff was overlooked.

A good way to measure a secretary:
1) Is she pleasant on the phone? Does she make a good phone appearance?

2) Are messages relayed in a timely manner? Can she disern what is an important message that requires immediate attention as compared to something to not "bother" the big guy right at this minute?

3) Does she have a through comprehension of her company's busness, what her boss's work is, who the clients are, how things are run?

4) Is she an asset to her boss, to the company, or is she an expensive lump?

5) Is she likeable? Is she easy to work with, a team player? Is she a gossiper (always looking for an opportunity to make someone look bad to make herself look good)?

I have a Bachelor's Degree is Business Administration. So I have fairly good knowledge on this subject.

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dan wa in Englewood, Colorado

66 months ago

Wow.

Tks Mary very much. It is great ideals.

They are questions to measure job performance.

Tks again

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Eileen Bull in Gilbert, Arizona

64 months ago

This forum is extremely helpful and filled with voices of reason. Glad to be aboard!

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Cassie Z. in Austin, Texas

64 months ago

Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida said: My questions is how to measure effectiveness of secretary position?

I know. From what I have seen in the legal field, effectiveness is based on whether or not the person she works for complains about her (sad, but true).

I've seen a few secretaries who were great, but the attorney she worked for didn't like her, so he did nothing but complain.

I've worked with several secretaries who did as littl as they could get away with doing, but they worked with someone who was extremely easy going - so all the undone stuff was overlooked.

A good way to measure a secretary:
1) Is she pleasant on the phone? Does she make a good phone appearance?

2) Are messages relayed in a timely manner? Can she disern what is an important message that requires immediate attention as compared to something to not "bother" the big guy right at this minute?

3) Does she have a through comprehension of her company's busness, what her boss's work is, who the clients are, how things are run?

4) Is she an asset to her boss, to the company, or is she an expensive lump?

5) Is she likeable? Is she easy to work with, a team player? Is she a gossiper (always looking for an opportunity to make someone look bad to make herself look good)?

I have a Bachelor's Degree is Business Administration. So I have fairly good knowledge on this subject.

I have a question for any one that can answer this question.

I got this job as a secretary, but now I run the entire office. There is nothing that I don't do for this company. I get along with our employees.
And I have a great relationship with our main employers. But after reviewing
all that I do. I asked for a raise and his responce was, because I didn't go
to school or have a degree in Business Administaration. He feels that he
shouldn't give me a raise, till I go to school. But he trusts me to run the
office. Am I over reacting or is he in the wrong.

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FranciD in Youngstown, Ohio

54 months ago

Cassie, I've been there and you may not be over reacting...it all depends on whether he's speaking from a self-serving personal perspective, mentor perspective or company/corporate mandate. If it's a self-serving personal view, then unfortunately, he may be "using" and relying on the fact that since you don't have a degree, you will succumb to a sense of not being qualified to receive or due a raise and furthermore would not dare consider leaving the company or moving to another position. If he's speaking to you as a mentor, he may very well appreciate your skills and knows that a degree would only enhance your skill sets and marketability in achieving the financial goals you seek...has your best interest at heart. Finally, there may be company or corporate mandates that require employees to show and take initiative in self-improvements as pursuing certifications and/or degrees before a raise can be provided...the requirement of additional training (certification, degree) substantiates any company concerns with their return on investment (ROI) which would be a raise. Speaking as someone with over 20 years experience in the secretarial/administrative field and through the years obtained a master's degree, I hope this information reaches you and is helpful.

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