Bilingual Preferred

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Comments (6)

isis in Bristol, Pennsylvania

25 months ago

Companies have to be very careful with how they words things because of legal ramifications. I agree with Bluetea, don't waste your time.

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tripplesix in Washington, District of Columbia

24 months ago

Try looking for jobs in areas that do not have a strong Latino presence. That may be hard.... but that may help you in avoiding the "Spanish preferred" issue. If you are already doing that then good luck. I hope something works out.

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gnote in Los Angeles, California

24 months ago

Thanks for your comments. All were very helpful. I am moving soon to an area where there are more English-speaking individuals. Most of the jobs do not have the bilingual preference to them.

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JACI JANET RIVERA

23 months ago

gnote in Long Beach, California said: I was just curious exactly what is meant by " Bilingual Preferred." Does that really mean the company is set on hiring a bilingual candidate and is just using there words to not appear discriminatory, or would they really consider a candidate who is not bilingual. I have been out of the job market for awhile, and, re-entering again, it is difficult to even find a job that interests me that does not state a bilingual prerequisite. It seemed like a few interviews went well, but I did not get the job.

I am an independent recruiter which means I get job descriptions and requests from hiring companies. I only get paid if I fill the job, so I fill it 90% of the time. In terms if your question, bilingual is usually "preferred" NOT required. Rarely is it required. It DOES have to do with the job itself. Is this skill a "must have" or "nice to have"? I submit people every day WITHOUT this requirement as long as they have the other skills and experience. Bilingual can be any 2 languages, most people think Spanish but in my industry I work the German, French, Koreans and others daily so do be quick to think Spanish. Think of "bilingual" as a Bachelor's degree vs. a Master's degree, everything else being equal which one is more valuable? My company just had a BIG WIN, we place a CEO for a global GERMAN supplier in Michigan. Our guy was English speaking 100%, no German language skills BUT he had everything else. So do not let "bilingual" shy you away from a job. If you have the industry experience they want, they will "flex" on language 95% of the time. Trust me, I do this for a living. :)

Happy Job Hunting,

JANET JACI RIVERA

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Jobber in Bloomington, Indiana

21 months ago

I do hiring at my company and we add "preferred" to many qualifications that would be nice but are not requirements. If a job description says "preferred," it often means that the company's dream candidate would have that quality but that there isn't a great expectation of finding such a person, or that it would be nice but isn't strictly necessary. If you list preferences as requirements, it can drastically reduce the number of applicants you get and derail the hiring effort.

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Girl Scout in Maitland, Florida

20 months ago

Jobber in Bloomington, Indiana said: I do hiring at my company and we add "preferred" to many qualifications that would be nice but are not requirements. If a job description says "preferred," it often means that the company's dream candidate would have that quality but that there isn't a great expectation of finding such a person, or that it would be nice but isn't strictly necessary. If you list preferences as requirements, it can drastically reduce the number of applicants you get and derail the hiring effort.

I do the hiring too and I put bi-lingual (Spanish & English speaking) as "preferred" so that if we do have the choice (the dream candidate) of two equally qualified people then we could justify hiring the bi-lingual applicant.

I was just recently approached by a manager who wanted it removed from the job description because she said "I don't want people who don't speak Spanish not to apply!" I almost fell off my chair. So, obviously we need to explain what the true meaning of that is on a job description!

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