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lswcytotech in Phoenix, Arizona

36 months ago

I was thinking maybe there are other new grads out there that might want to share their job hunting experiences.

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lswcytotech in Phoenix, Arizona

36 months ago

I've had a couple of interviews here in Phoenix. The first was a phone interview with Sonora Quest. I got the impression they were looking for someone with experience assisting FNAs, but we only got to observe them during school during our one-week rotation.

They asked if I was volunteering to keep up my skills. I said I'd love to, but didn't know where, and would appreciate any information about volunteer opportunities. I never heard back on that one.

The second was an on-site interview at LabCorp. Several times they asked me why I wasn't looking for a job at a hospital. I explained that I hadn't wanted to stay in Houston, where there were some hospital jobs, and couldn't stay because I'd run out of money. I was sending out resumes, but hadn't seen any job postings for hospitals here in AZ.

Although LabCorp had several openings, they didn't hire me because they said I got an 80% on their slide test and they required 90%. I had called ASC on 2 negatives, SCC on an adenocarcinoma, and negative on an AGC. It probably didn't help that I hadn't looked at a slide since leaving school a month before, but I haven't had access to a microscope since then. I've been doing every online screening quiz or case study I can find, but it's not the same, I guess.

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jennidalton83 in Cleveland, Ohio

35 months ago

Are you applying out of state at all? You are going to have to bite the bullet and possibly face having to move for a while. My experience with the relocation thing: I graduated in 2007. I had 3 out of state interviews. 2 of them I was able to get reimbursement for travel (negotiate this if you can when setting up interviews). The other I had to pay for, had to put it on my credit card as I was out of school and not working yet. It was worth it though, because I did end up getting a job. I was offered a position by all 3 places I interviewed at. How, you ask? These are just suggestions, so take them for what you will. I just know how hard it is to go through the job search. First, when you write your cover letter, be sure you are mentioning why you are interested in that particular job, moving to that particular place. I always did research on areas and tailored letters to fit my interest in those places/positions. They want to see that you are genuinely interested in THEIR position, not just A position. That you are interested in LIVING and STAYING in that location for a time, not just until you find something better. Also, I think the volunteer comment they made was rediculous. I have never heard of anyone doing this before. I don't even know how that would work, as you wouldnt be covered by the lab insurance. When you interview, bring questions with you to show you are genuinely interested in the job. Be prepared to answer questions always in a positive manner. Nothing you say should ever end negatively. Also, I don't think they will ever put an ASCUS on a slide test. The slides should be straight forward, negatives, SILs, or carcinoma in general. ASCUS is too subjective. The first cytology job I had was a relocation. I was there for 2 years, loved it there, but then saw an opening an hour from my family and applied for that. Got that job, moved home and commuted to it, and then a little over a year later, a job opened up 20 minutes from home!

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choclategirl08 in Saginaw, Michigan

35 months ago

I have been unemployed here in Michigan since March which has been about 8 months now. Its very frustrating I graduated with my Bachelors in Health Services Administration and have been looking for work out of state. I would like to move out of state in which I have been pursistently applying and have been on 3 interviews as far as Ohio. I really believe they are looking at location. Do I need to move to whatever state i'm interested will it make my chances greater on getting a job. Another state I want to move to is Georgia. Anyone got ideas?

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No in Westborough, Massachusetts

35 months ago

Only move away if you have the offer in hand. The fact that you CAN move relatively easily and WILL move is all employers care about. Dont run around the nation like a chicken with your head cut off. Blunt advice, but it will save you lots of misery.

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cytoguy123 in Yucaipa, California

35 months ago

I took a slide exam and there was an AGUS case :-/ They said the exam was straight forward... The cervical cells looked reactive at most ( cohesive, nuclei and no over lapping) The problem with this companies slide exam is some of the cases were on the fence for a target diagnosis. I needed a 90% to pass but each under and over call knocked 5% off the test.

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jennidalton83 in Cleveland, Ohio

34 months ago

Its not unusual to have AGUS cases on the exams. AGUS cases are usually a good example of AGUS though, so I am surprised they gave you one that didn't look straight forward. An anal pap is not unusual either, if you are interviewing at a location that screens those. When I interviewed at locations that did NonGYN work, the test included NonGYN cases. Try not to second guess cases on the test, go with your initial gut instinct. That is usually what is right, and what they are looking for.

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deserthackberry in Woodway, Texas

34 months ago

Yeah, I've actually started a new job elsewhere and had a case that looked the same yesterday. I'm curious to see how the pathologist calls it.

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newgrad2 in Texas

31 months ago

A few weeks ago I got a bile duct brushing that looked malignant to me -- "drunken honeycomb" -- but called it suspicious. It came back negative.
Last week I got another sample from the same patient. It looked much worse, but being new, I followed the advice we got in school and showed it to the senior techs. They both called it reactive, so I took their advice.
That was a bad idea. I should have at least called it suspicious again. It came back malignant.
I guess the lesson is, ask your coworkers for advice, but don't assume they are correct or that they have your best interests at heart.

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Sam Kaiserblade in Venice, Florida

31 months ago

Best to be cautious sometimes on those bile duct brushings. I've seen "experts" in this field call them malignant only to find out later it was really benign. Pretty bad feeling to see someone have a whipple procedure done for a misdiagnosis. Bottom line is that cytology is extremely subjective and bile duct brushings are VERY difficult.

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clay in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

31 months ago

yeah the volunteer thing is absolutely ridiculous. every research institution around here stopped accepting volunteers for liability issues

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