What schools in the US are good schools for Diesel Mechanic training?

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mike in Brunswick, Georgia

51 months ago

I have seen it first hand the real world aint nothing pretty and it gets ugly to the point that one wants to give up, I myself have considered a change after just working out here and there trying to just land a damn apprentice spot but no one cares or is willing to do so , but alas in the meanwhile im forced to learn on my own, ive took courses in high school and even graduated "UTI" and still feel like it wasnt enough to even put out against someone who's been doing it for years on end, and the injustice you face for the most part isn't even worth it at times and being treated and worked as someone who's been doing for years even though youve just started, I may not have years behind me but I didn't waste time here and there with my thumb up my @ss and made mistakes along the way sometimes to the point of loosing my mind of the way some shops are ran, what the other guys are telling is the truth, and I 've spent at least $1000 or more worth of tools and still isn't enough and being at the bottom of the totem pole cant cut it to afford that and pay bills. But what I've seen out there are a lot of so called "techs" that can bolt on and off parts but when it comes down to the nitty gritty aspect of diagnostics it wouldn't cut it.

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Dave587 in Santa Clarita, California

50 months ago

My advice for those who are looking to get in a good diesel progrm is find a place that teaches you the fundamentals of operations of diesel engines and drivetrain. Sorry to say but the rest you will have to learn hands on. Also if you do decide to go to school you must read at least 14hrs a week and be active in the program.

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Matt

50 months ago

I am a shop owner and If a Grad of UTI applies I put it in the waste basket. My friend works at a local Ford Dealer and Same thing there, I have never been there personally but It seems like they do not have enough hands on. Iv'e tried 3 grads and one drove a car through my wall after a brake job, One did not know tight from loose when removing bolts and one made it a week until he told me a car needed a head gasket when it had a 1/2" hole in a hose. My old Boss went to WHY tech and Liked it a lot. Just some help.

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WyoGrad in Hastings, Minnesota

47 months ago

kyle in Chicago, Illinois said: i just graduated from uti and they have the best course for diesel. if you have ever changed oil then you will know more then the wyotech teachers.

Wow so your quick to judge WyoTech teachers on their brain power. Just to let u know i graduated from WyoTech and believe u me my instructors were very intelligent when it comes to anything with diesel. I even had an instuctor that is literally just a few IQ points from being declared a genius if u want to know how an A/C unit works and exactly how and why this guy will tell ya. If u wish to know anything about an engine those teachers will have the answers.

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Jake in Toledo, Ohio

47 months ago

i attended diesel mechanic school at ohio technical college in cleveland, i thought i learned a lot when i was there. but once you actually get out into the field you find out that you just pissed your money away. you'll know the basics when you start the job but the things they teach you, you wont be doing unless you get into a dealership or if your company sends you for further training. but the veterans in the shop will teach you how to do thing, hands on experience is way better. save your money. try to get into a shop that will train your kid. then put that 26,000 your gonna spend on him towards tools.

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John in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

45 months ago

First, I just want to say I've been a diesel mechanic for 5 years. I started out at a Kenworth Dealership, and now work for waste management. I have to agree with the first person who replied. Most mechanics I know who have been doing it for 15+ years told me that if I were smart, I'd go to college and do something else.

That said, diesel mechanicing is all about the money. A dealership is usually where the best money is IMHO. So if you want your kid wants to really learn, and really make the most money, have them go to around the various shops and ask about their apprenticeship program. Here in OKC, the Kenworth shop has you work for so many months, then go to school for so many months. The whole thing takes about 2 years, and when your done you receive your Associates in Applied Science. This is the same degree you will get from UTI and WYOTECH.

Be warned, an associates in a applied sciences (at least here in oklahoma) is not an associates like you would get from a traditional university. So if he decides later to go to school, some college courses may transfer, but he will not be able to claim a traditional Associates.

And make sure he's ready to spend big money. I have a decent to small tool box, and it cost me 4000 dollars. A ratchet from snap on, a regular 3/8 is $80 before tax, and that is CHEAP compared to the 300-400 wrench sets.

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Krump in Chino Hills, California

42 months ago

jsoutar said: My son graduated from UTI Phoenix. He has worked as a diesel tech now for 5 years. He was laid off 3 months ago and has not found a job yet. If you are skilled you want top wages but people are taking these jobs for low wages. He gets more for unemployment! Good luck getting the wages you want and the job. He has posted a minimum of 30 resumes. UTI is a great school and you do need schooling because they all ask if you have been to school. There is also a UTI out here in Rancho Cucamonga, Ca.

So are you saying it is worth going to UTI or not?

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Bill In Riverside Ca in Los Angeles, California

42 months ago

Krump in Chino Hills, California said: So are you saying it is worth going to UTI or not?

Ive been a mechanic for 20 plus years ive wrenched on everthing from buses to trucks and for most im considered an oldtimer because back when i frist started there was no engine out there that was computer or ecm controled now everthing is controled by some sort of a module . The bad part about thease schools is you will not see the studants tear down a motor and rebuild it alot of the training is class discussion and video tapes but dont get me worng they do have hands on work but not what your going to see in a regular shop trust me i Know .
The reoson for that is i worked for a local Innernational Shop and one kid came in from UTI and wanted a journyman position well guess what he got hired but for only 13.00 a hour and he was hired by innernational they will pay for his schooling but he has to stay there for a year its a contract if he gets laided off or fired before the years time will its on him he will not make big bucks trust me

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ben in Worcester, Massachusetts

42 months ago

WyoGrad in Hastings, Minnesota said: Wow so your quick to judge WyoTech teachers on their brain power. Just to let u know i graduated from WyoTech and believe u me my instructors were very intelligent when it comes to anything with diesel. I even had an instuctor that is literally just a few IQ points from being declared a genius if u want to know how an A/C unit works and exactly how and why this guy will tell ya. If u wish to know anything about an engine those teachers will have the answers.

sorry buddy but i graduated from UTI, A/C unit wasn't the best example cuz i would've said how to build a block from scracth, scratch i mean mold it to an engine, any idiot from uti ca explain scientifically how an a/c or a refer unit works, literary scientifically, how in the refer it circulates in a drawing and how a/c in the car is moved around and how air exitted..but thats just me..

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ben in Worcester, Massachusetts

42 months ago

for the person with the son, some comments are true, i graduated in 2009 and if i had a chance to re-do it i would go into another career in the bachelors zone, computer science or management degrees..if your kid is young enough guide him thru college, then after college tell him to go do mechanic and you'll thank someone, other than that i would go to UTI..they told me you make close to 100k, im yet to see that graduate who makes anywhere close to 50k..

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who me in Carlisle, Pennsylvania

42 months ago

uti and wyo tech are the most expensive schools available. I would really look around to see what other programs are available
uti and wyo tech were among the school i was looking at the time
The one thing that stood out were the BIG class size and the HUGE price tag, well over 25 grand. I evently chose a local school that cost half as much for the same amout of education. The ironic thing is people that graduate still start out doing a lot of the thing that a trainee would do. The school provides the education You still haft to find find the job!

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lisa in Kankakee, Illinois

33 months ago

Dfreese in Chicago, Illinois said: im a graduate from uti they have an awesome program in glendale heights IL we did every thing you do in shop great diagnoisis training and hands on.

Your graduation from uti in glendale heights do your have a good job now. My son is going to attend in August 20ll I have had problems in funding, they are not wanting to fund the school all at once and I have read alot of foroms about the school being overly priced if you could email me at lisa_b45@yahoo.com.

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Biggs in Chester, Pennsylvania

33 months ago

I don't know a whole lot about these schools but I have been thinking this is a career path I would like. From what I have found researching is WyoTech or UTI cost close to 30K which is a ton of money. I was looking at couple of state run tech schools and they are around 7K to finish up. I don't know if places would hire one over the other but it sounds like either way once you start working you pretty much start from scratch anyhow.

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Vijay in Dallas, Texas

32 months ago

List of <a href=dieselmechanictraininghq.com>diesel mechanic schools</a>

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noahsgrama in Banning, California

32 months ago

Bill In Riverside Ca in Los Angeles, California said: Ive been a mechanic for 20 plus years ive wrenched on everthing from buses to trucks and for most im considered an oldtimer because back when i frist started there was no engine out there that was computer or ecm controled now everthing is controled by some sort of a module . The bad part about thease schools is you will not see the studants tear down a motor and rebuild it alot of the training is class discussion and video tapes but dont get me worng they do have hands on work but not what your going to see in a regular shop trust me i Know .
The reoson for that is i worked for a local Innernational Shop and one kid came in from UTI and wanted a journyman position well guess what he got hired but for only 13.00 a hour and he was hired by innernational they will pay for his schooling but he has to stay there for a year its a contract if he gets laided off or fired before the years time will its on him he will not make big bucks trust me

My son went to UTI over 8 years ago. He used most of his GI benefits towards the fee but still has a student loan. He was trained very well at UTI and they did do engine overhauls. His expertise is engines and never had a returned one. Jobs are slim and you will get more money with engines. In the long term a supervisor position could be possible. The pay is not 100,000 a year! He only makes 48,000 per year and this is California. The job is hard on you physically so if you're not physically fit forget it.

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Bill Gilbert Riverside Ca. in Los Angeles, California

32 months ago

Your wright times are tough the only thing i can tell you your son needs to leave the area for a week or so hit some of the larger truck outfitts , what kind of engines is he good at ? , alot of companys are looking for all around mechanics
There are alot of good engine men out there so he has to be flexable when he applys for a position , he might be on re-programing issues all day or electrial problems he has to be on top of his game .
have him jump on th inner net and start fludding companies

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Rick in Laramie, Wyoming

30 months ago

Depending on how bad the block is yes you can fix an enigine block not recommended but we had to learn just in case.

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Rick in Laramie, Wyoming

30 months ago

noahsgrama in Banning, California said: My son went to UTI over 8 years ago. He used most of his GI benefits towards the fee but still has a student loan. He was trained very well at UTI and they did do engine overhauls. His expertise is engines and never had a returned one. Jobs are slim and you will get more money with engines. In the long term a supervisor position could be possible. The pay is not 100,000 a year! He only makes 48,000 per year and this is California. The job is hard on you physically so if you're not physically fit forget it.

Wyotech is very hands on com in there and you will see. I'v completed over 20 tune complete tune ups in 6 weeks

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Mike G in Clermont, Florida

30 months ago

You may want to check out the <a href="www.loudmarket.com/programs/diesel_mechanic_schools.html">diesel mechanic schools here</a>, but as previously mentioned, you get out what you put in. Going to a mechanic school is certainly not going to guarantee you a top paying job right out of the gate. Especially in this economy..

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Mike G in Clermont, Florida

30 months ago

Mike G in Clermont, Florida said: You may want to check out the <a href="www.loudmarket.com/programs/diesel_mechanic_schools.html">diesel mechanic schools here</a>, but as previously mentioned, you get out what you put in. Going to a mechanic school is certainly not going to guarantee you a top paying job right out of the gate. Especially in this economy..

Sorry, my link above is messed up. Here it is again: www.loudmarket.com/programs/diesel_mechanic_schools.html

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Interstate Companies in Minneapolis, Minnesota

30 months ago

Hello,

My name is Paul David and I am the Hiring Coordinator for Interstate Companies. We have over 600 Diesel Technicians/Mechanics working for our company so I have seen many different backgrounds in terms of education. The question is whether one school is better than the other? Certain schools have more funding so the equipment and tools they work with are better than a community or technical college. They also charge more for tuition.

I have helped hire diesel mechanics with different backgrounds, both educational and work experiences. I don't nessarily give preferance to one college over the other. Something that I think is important is the fact that they went to school and obtained a degree. Some companies may only hire candidates with certain degrees, the same in the corporate world. Some companies will only hire from IVY league schools rather from state universities. It all depends on what kind of company you want to work for. Another thing to consider is finding a company that will offer continuing training because technology is always changing which causes engines to change and evolve.

If you are looking for career opportunites as a Diesel Technician/Mechanic please visit our websites listed below. You can email your resume to careers@istate.com or careers@istatetruck.com

www.istate.com

www.istatetruck.com

Please note that we are located in 9 states and have 25 branches.

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Russ in Windsor, Colorado

30 months ago

I am a Fleet Manager for a mid size family owned company with around 70 heavy duty trucks in our fleet.

We have hired mechanics from WyoTech and UTI in the past and I haven't been impressed with either. So now when i am filling a position and looking over a resume, if they are a tech school grad it is a negative. I wouldn't say they go straight to the trash, but definitely not to the top of the pile.

I say this because the discipline of going to school is good, but it seems they want too much in wages for the "real world experience" or lack of, that they have. They do not have the skills to truly diagnose problems and end up throwing parts at it instead.

So what am I looking for in a mechanic then?

It's easy to find a "wrench turner". What I am always looking for is someone that is skilled in computer diagnostics and electrical knowledge. These guys are worth the money. And of course a strong work ethic.

So my advise is to spend the money on tools instead. Get OTJ training and work your way up. You'll be starting at the bottom anyway.

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TGPII in Orland Park, Illinois

30 months ago

I am mine in New Jersey said: Hi!

I am a parent and have a child that is interested in going to school to become a Diesel Mechanic. I was wondering if anyone in the field has suggestions relating to schools that provide Diesel Tech training. Or any schools that you have attended. Anyone know how Wyotech, UTI, or Ohio Diesel Tech are? Any help is appreciated!

Thanks!

Join the miltiary they have great Diesel Mechanics, and you have a job.

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ningals3223

28 months ago

If you want to be a good diesel mechanic, dont join the military. I'm not saying joining the military is a bad thing but it will not make you a good mechanic. Military mechanics are pretty much parts changers, most of them have no trouble shooting skills at all. The school they go to is like 3 months long and doesnt teach them anything useful except how to use a TM. I know this because I was in the Marine Corps as a Truck Mechanic for 4 years and also was QC for my shop. It's a guaranteed job though for the next 20 yrs of your life

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ndscs in Jamestown, North Dakota

27 months ago

its a good school

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Kate in Ann Arbor, Michigan

26 months ago

Matt said: I am a shop owner and If a Grad of UTI applies I put it in the waste basket. My friend works at a local Ford Dealer and Same thing there, I have never been there personally but It seems like they do not have enough hands on. Iv'e tried 3 grads and one drove a car through my wall after a brake job, One did not know tight from loose when removing bolts and one made it a week until he told me a car needed a head gasket when it had a 1/2" hole in a hose. My old Boss went to WHY tech and Liked it a lot. Just some help.

Hi Matt,

I'm a reporter with Michigan Radio looking at the experiences/hiring potential of people who graduate from technical colleges. I'm interested in your thoughts as a business owner. Can you email me? I'd like to be in touch. Kate(at)michiganradio dot org. Thank you.

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Lisa Johnson in Lake Worth, Florida

26 months ago

One of the best diesel instructor and mentor is Charlie Johnson at palm beach state college
Pa

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redneck in Fenton, Michigan

25 months ago

"does the future diesel mechanic have realistic goals or does the kid already think they know it all? Ultimately is your kid really into putting in long hours for a while for less pay to learn. How do you encourage your kid when discouragement and fatigue set in? Perhaps another career path?"

did they ask you what the kid is willing to do? i am seventeen and i'm lined up for u.n.o.h. (university of northwestern Ohio) this summer. i have read reviews from students and staff on this school and 90% is a great review the other 10% is people whining because they just wanted to party.

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redneck in Fenton, Michigan

25 months ago

"does the future diesel mechanic have realistic goals or does the kid already think they know it all? Ultimately is your kid really into putting in long hours for a while for less pay to learn. How do you encourage your kid when discouragement and fatigue set in? Perhaps another career path?"

did they ask you what the kid is willing to do? i am seventeen and i'm lined up for u.n.o.h. (university of northwestern Ohio) this summer. i have read reviews from students and staff on this school and 90% is a great review the other 10% is people whining because they just wanted to party.

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john boy in Staunton, Virginia

24 months ago

farley in Apo said:

im afraid your wrong!!!!!

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Cummins NPower LLC in Minneapolis, Minnesota

21 months ago

We have diesel technician positions available in Minnesota, North Dakota, Wisconsin, and Illinois.

Please go to our website to learn more about us and to apply!

www.cumminsnpower.com

EEO/AA Employer

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flyn2bhi in Brunswick, Ohio

15 months ago

John in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma said: First, I just want to say I've been a diesel mechanic for 5 years. I started out at a Kenworth Dealership, and now work for waste management. I have to agree with the first person who replied. Most mechanics I know who have been doing it for 15+ years told me that if I were smart, I'd go to college and do something else.

That said, diesel mechanicing is all about the money. A dealership is usually where the best money is IMHO. So if you want your kid wants to really learn, and really make the most money, have them go to around the various shops and ask about their apprenticeship program. Here in OKC, the Kenworth shop has you work for so many months, then go to school for so many months. The whole thing takes about 2 years, and when your done you receive your Associates in Applied Science. This is the same degree you will get from UTI and WYOTECH.

Be warned, an associates in a applied sciences (at least here in oklahoma) is not an associates like you would get from a traditional university. So if he decides later to go to school, some college courses may transfer, but he will not be able to claim a traditional Associates.

And make sure he's ready to spend big money. I have a decent to small tool box, and it cost me 4000 dollars. A ratchet from snap on, a regular 3/8 is $80 before tax, and that is CHEAP compared to the 300-400 wrench sets.

I have been in this line of work for over 25 years. it has it's up's and downs. finding the money is the problem. everyone wants you to work for them. the tool cost's are high You can buy a lot of Suit's to sell something. for what just a few tool's cost a scanner is about$5000.00 Getting your money from customers Is the real Hansel. The new trucks are very expensive to repair. Mechanics have a bad reputation. Until someone needs one then they are your best Buddy. With tools buy the best. Price is high but the cost is 0 they are warranted for life.

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Henry Basham in Cleveland, Ohio

15 months ago

I'm new to this way of talking you can learn more from someone buy looking at them and what they are about then just how they type on a computer.
Hands on and learning from the older guy's is the best way . however to learn how the systems work is how to fix them without just changing parts all day in and out. Parts are very expensive: Then not to find the real problem and then to Bill it O.M.G. With my Experience People bring trucks car's or even Buses in to repair and they was thinking it would be cheep!!! What is cheep?? Finding the true problem Is the real work. anyone can change parts.

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mrkeith in NEWARK, New Jersey

14 months ago

Im in NJ and there is PLENTY of jobs for diesel mechanics over here. I read this whole forum and it sounds like a bunch of guys whining. I'm attending Lincoln Tech in April and i am looking forward to it. I know after I complete the training I wont be make $30ph but i should be bringing in something around the $20ph range. And thats good enough for me. As long as I can get O/T when its available then im fine with starting from the bottom and working my way up. Not to mention the side jobs you can pick up as well. I was looking to get some insight on the whole diesel mechanic trade off of this sight but everybody is so negative that i cant stand reading another comment. To the guy that want to know if his son should go to Diesel mechanic school, I say do it. Then tell him to come back here and leave us a message letting us know how he got through the school and is doing well.

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vic in Accord, New York

8 months ago

mrkeith in NEWARK, New Jersey said: Im in NJ and there is PLENTY of jobs for diesel mechanics over here. I read this whole forum and it sounds like a bunch of guys whining. I'm attending Lincoln Tech in April and i am looking forward to it. I know after I complete the training I wont be make $30ph but i should be bringing in something around the $20ph range. And thats good enough for me. As long as I can get O/T when its available then im fine with starting from the bottom and working my way up. Not to mention the side jobs you can pick up as well. I was looking to get some insight on the whole diesel mechanic trade off of this sight but everybody is so negative that i cant stand reading another comment. To the guy that want to know if his son should go to Diesel mechanic school, I say do it. Then tell him to come back here and leave us a message letting us know how he got through the school and is doing well.

Hi Mr Keith
i am looking to join Lincoln tech and was wondering if you had any insight on what the program is like.. how much of your day does it take and how long before you finish.. is it possible to get a loan for the whole program etc
Please help

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