Getting a license in Texas coming from California

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Matthew in Henderson, Texas

75 months ago

I completed an electrician's apprenticeship in California through ABC (4000 hours and 4 years of school) which has an affiliate in Houston Texas and put in over 8000 journeyman hours in California. I passed the Master's Electrician test in Texas.

I am having nothing but problems trying to get a license in the state of Texas. I have sent in paperwork after paperwork proving hours, school information for over 8 months! It started with "I don't have a journeyman card" I have an apprenticeship card that you only get after completing the program. I explained it is the same as a journeyman card in Texas. I have sent in letters from the school saying I was a journeyman. I have sent in letters from employers stating I was a journeyman. I have sent in letters from the state that I received when I graduated stating that I was a journeyman. Now they are saying they don't recognize California electrical journeymen? Does anyone have any pointers on getting a license in this state besides starting all over again?

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bob in Aliso Viejo, California

75 months ago

to be honest with you your problem is that the program you went through in cali. (abc) is crap they should of given you a jw card from the get go and you wouldn't be in this prob.

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paul in Sacramento, California

75 months ago

tx recognizes wa jw's,so i suggest pass the jw test in wa... that will get u a test date in tx for a jw card. ... but explain how u got your tx master license in ca.

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ken in Hamilton, Ohio

75 months ago

Matthew in Henderson, Texas said: I completed an electrician's apprenticeship in California through ABC (4000 hours and 4 years of school) which has an affiliate in Houston Texas and put in over 8000 journeyman hours in California. I passed the Master's Electrician test in Texas.

I am having nothing but problems trying to get a license in the state of Texas. I have sent in paperwork after paperwork proving hours, school information for over 8 months! It started with "I don't have a journeyman card" I have an apprenticeship card that you only get after completing the program. I explained it is the same as a journeyman card in Texas. I have sent in letters from the school saying I was a journeyman. I have sent in letters from employers stating I was a journeyman. I have sent in letters from the state that I received when I graduated stating that I was a journeyman. Now they are saying they don't recognize California electrical journeymen? Does anyone have any pointers on getting a license in this state besides starting all over again?

Texas does not recognize any other state jouryman cards. I had this problem as well. You will have to take the Texas state test to get a j-card.

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emilio cervantes in Long Beach, California

73 months ago

your completion of the 4 year ABC program does not constitute that you are now a licensed journeyman in the state of california. you have to pass the examination first that is given statewide, separately from the ABC-non union and JATC-union programs. all those programs do is log in enough hours for you to individually take your journey exam. once you pass the exam in california, you are certified to work as a journeyman licensed electrician WITHIN the state of california. if you are to do work in any other state, you would have to retest for the journeyman cert in that state as well. in california, its the DIR, dept of industrial relations. you download an app, send in the proof of the program, pay 125, and then set up the time and date for the exam. then do the same for texas.

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Matthew from East Texas in East Texas, Texas

73 months ago

CA did not have a state test when I went through the program. They had testing for contractors equivalent to a master license in Texas.

Anyways, I now have a journeyman's license in the state of Texas. I gave up on the Masters until another 2 years.

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Matthew from East Texas in East Texas, Texas

73 months ago

Paul I didn't get the Texas Master's license. I passed the test you have to pass in order to get try to get it.

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JOE BANANA in Upland, California

69 months ago

You passed your masters in Texas, but cant get a jw cert? And I thought Californastan sucks. I just don't get this certification BS I've been doin elect. for 33 years and all of a sudden the state wants money for me to keep my job WTF.

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JOE BANANA in Upland, California

69 months ago

And another thing, if our work still gets inspected, and passes, what is a certification for? If it don't pass then we become a plumber, simple.
And if a "handiman" can do the same work without a cert.(not as well).When I did service calls they mostly consisted of fixing what joe homeowner, or his"landlord" did. But I have to be certified. What is it I'm just not seeing?

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Jason in League City, Texas

66 months ago

Matthew, I would like to get in touch with you and any others who have the same story here in Texas. My story is close to same as yours. It took me five months of tring to run down all the Masters I worked for in Iowa to come up with my hours. There has to be something we can do to fix this problem of out of state electricians.

Jason King

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jason goff in Tomball, Texas

64 months ago

they are making it hard on us I took my exam in Nevada and passed now I'm living in Texas scheduled
to take the J test in a month but can't work until I pass. They should make a temp card for new residents coming into the area

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Bob

64 months ago

JOE BANANA your not seeing the insurance cost behind the whole thing...b4 there was no cert but there still was for hair dressers really "our" jobs are delacate and over all can cost life if done wrong...regulation is good!!!

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Bryan in Lubbock, Texas

64 months ago

Its funny with 6 years of App., that I can install Med-Gas systems that life depends on, yet when the contract is over the J-card holders who arnt as good as toilet paper, (one Master that thought he should hold the fish tape with the linemans teeth instead of the handle with the fish tape puller) It just means that you can pass the book smart test, yet still not be a Master of the trade.
TEXAS LIVEs in fairy tales

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joebanana in Upland, California

64 months ago

Bob said: JOE BANANA your not seeing the insurance cost behind the whole thing...b4 there was no cert but there still was for hair dressers really "our" jobs are delacate and over all can cost life if done wrong...regulation is good!!!

But, if "handymen", "homeowners", and even "landscapers" can do electrical work without a cert., and we've been doing it for many years without one, why all of a sudden, will we be safer if we're certified, the test I took didn't have any "safety" related questions, and any moron that can use an index, can pass, there were no 'practical application questions,it was all code, NATIONAL code, so why aren't JW cards national, so local jurisdictions can get their cut of the pie. Normally, people pay for stuff to better their livelihood, we are paying to better someone else's. If we're certified the contractor gets a break on his insurance, what do we get for $175, the chance to spend a Saturday taking a test, and we get to pay for it too, plus we get to pay for "continuing education", the gas to get there, the time which we don't get paid for, and get to miss dinner twice a week, only to buy dinner, all so the contractor gets a break on his insurance. How many "tie off" questions were on your test? How many "ladder safety" questions? Any "outrigger"? "load calcs".?

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Bob

64 months ago

There was one load calc question...yes the rest were code...yes that is bull...you have to remeber the code is bare min. It is not meant as an installation manual so in theory the entire industry is flawed and geared to bare min.! My "contuinuing Ed" classes are free. So it's really no skin of my back. And idk about you but I make a lili more $ than Joe blow homeowner when I'm doing elect work. For me the state test took me 56 min and I got 91/100 but as I sat wating for my friend to come out I saw 3 guys walk out that had failed..one of them for the 3rd time...I DONT WANT TO WORK NEXT TO THEM...Granted the cert system is flawd (very) but it is better than nothing. All you see is what it's costing you out of pocket but you turn a blind eye to the rewards!!!!

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joebanana in Upland, California

64 months ago

What rewards, and if you've been in the trade long enough you know who you don't want to work with, or, you show them what there doing wrong. Back to "rewards" The only "reward" I seek is a job well done, and a pay check. How has certification made the trade any safer? Before certification, the ones that weren't worthy, were weeded out real quick by the contractor, since it's his reputation on the line. And, the majority of home electrical fires are caused by the homeowner, not the installation. And the final okay comes from the inspector, If there is a fire, who do you think is going to be the first questioned by the insurance company during the investigation. And yeah I'm looking at MY cost, the overtime, that's part of labor laws, that's REQUIRED to be paid, not only by local laws, but federal law.
That isn't, the gas and travel time to and from school, the lost overtime on jobs that you have to leave to go to school. books, the dinner that I usually eat at home, I have to buy twice a week. And did you get a raise for being certified? How have your working conditions improved? Do you feel safer on the job? Do you do better work, more work, do you know more, after certification? Just who benefit's, you, the customer, the state? California took in $7,040,775 in the first year of the scam. All totaled it costs me around $2,068 every 3 years to keep my cert. including lost wages. And, that's figured at time and a half, since school is after an 8 hr. day. So, how has your job improved?

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steve in Katy, Texas

60 months ago

Iam truying to take tests for master in texas i only have residental wireman license witch i hold for 4 yrs do i need get jw first?

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joebanana in Upland, California

60 months ago

One more thing, these "state certifications", are all based on the NATIONAL electric code, so having to retake the exam for each state you want to work in, is a joke. It's a scam. They say it's for safety, BS. Lets say the house you wired burned down, How is your being certified going to help the homeowner? I would say the bond, and insurance, is where they would get relief. Also, if a guy does crappy work, a cert. aint going to change that. Another thing is what's with the different "class's" of electricians, it's all the SAME code. Does a JW get paid the same as a residential? What's different in the "masters" exam from the JW? Harder code questions? Can a residential elect. do JW work? Can a JW do "Master" work? Where do you draw the line? If a painter can do electrical work without a cert.(just not for a living)but someone that's been doing elect. for 30+ years can't, without a cert. what kind of sense does that make? And, why does it cost a dollar a question, for a computer graded exam? Why $75 just to apply? And if you need a replacement card(which doesn't come with a renewal) they charge $30 for .03 cents worth of plastic. Why is this a "for profit","law" for the state? It doesn't increase wages, it doesn't guarantee work, and, it doesn't increase safety. And, why aren't framers, plumbers, landscapers,laborers, or any other trade required to be certified? Does the contractor get a break on his bonding, or insurance, by hiring "certified" electricians? And, why doesn't the state contractors board give the test?

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rukiddin in Jasper, Texas

60 months ago

Bryan in Lubbock, Texas said: Its funny with 6 years of App., that I can install Med-Gas systems that life depends on, yet when the contract is over the J-card holders who arnt as good as toilet paper, (one Master that thought he should hold the fish tape with the linemans teeth instead of the handle with the fish tape puller) It just means that you can pass the book smart test, yet still not be a Master of the trade.
TEXAS LIVEs in fairy tales

Med gas does not require a license, or common sense, to install.

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rukiddin in Jasper, Texas

60 months ago

steve in Katy, Texas said: Iam truying to take tests for master in texas i only have residental wireman license witch i hold for 4 yrs do i need get jw first?

Lol! You have got to be kidding me, right?

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joebanana in Upland, California

60 months ago

Matthew in Henderson, Texas said: I completed an electrician's apprenticeship in California through ABC (4000 hours and 4 years of school) which has an affiliate in Houston Texas and put in over 8000 journeyman hours in California. I passed the Master's Electrician test in Texas.

I am having nothing but problems trying to get a license in the state of Texas. I have sent in paperwork after paperwork proving hours, school information for over 8 months! It started with "I don't have a journeyman card" I have an apprenticeship card that you only get after completing the program. I explained it is the same as a journeyman card in Texas. I have sent in letters from the school saying I was a journeyman. I have sent in letters from employers stating I was a journeyman. I have sent in letters from the state that I received when I graduated stating that I was a journeyman. Now they are saying they don't recognize California electrical journeymen? Does anyone have any pointers on getting a license in this state besides starting all over again?

If you passed the master elect. exam, what do you need a JW cert. for? And, what are the benefits of a masters card over a JW, do you get paid more? How about foreman, do you need a "foreman" card too? Since the "code" is national, why does each state require that you know the national code for that state? The whole thing is a scam.

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Mike in Sacramento, California

57 months ago

jason goff in Tomball, Texas said: they are making it hard on us I took my exam in Nevada and passed now I'm living in Texas scheduled
to take the J test in a month but can't work until I pass. They should make a temp card for new residents coming into the area

Jason, I am moving to Houston in a few weeks and I see that to get that J card you need 8000hrs under a master electrician. I have 24 years but not under a master. How can I get around that?

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Mike Cason in League City, Texas

56 months ago

You can't.

I had about 20 years electrical related experience in my Houston business, but not under a master. It didn't count. I opened up an electrical contracting business in the county where I live which was legal in 1999 and ran it for 5 years. They threw that time in the trash can. I do have my JE card, and have had it for 9 years. Only 2 years is required. So, you need 8000 hours under a master for your JE card, then 2 more years under a master to be eligible to even take the exam. You have to be approved by the state to be able to take the exam.

I just sent in my papers yesterday to take the exam as the master of my current company is in the hospital and I need to get my own master's ticket to keep the business open if he passes on or becomes unable to make decisions. Yes, two licenses, two tests, and 6 years of working under a master now. I have almost 8. All in the name of public safety, which I agree with.

Good luck

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joebanana in Diamond Bar, California

56 months ago

"Public safety"? B.S. It has nothing to do with "safety", it's all about the money. States can't figure out enough ways to steal from the public. Most electrical fires are caused by the homeowner, or someone other than an electrician. In Calif.only electricians have to be certified, handymen don't, landscapers don't, uncle Vinnie don't, but all can do small electrical jobs, such as adding a circuit, or a recep., or running an extension cord through a wall. We, have plan checks, inspections, and when it comes down to it, inspectors are the responsible party. And just what do we get for spending time in CE,and paying for it? Nothing. We get to keep our job. Any other "permit" people are required to get, they get something for it, like, driving, fishing, hunting, business. Not required activities like work. $175 To take a computer graded exam, $30 for a replacement card, that don't come with the renewal, but cost them 3 cents. And $100 renewal fee, every three years plus $150 for school. IT'S A MONEY MAKING SCAM IS WHAT IT IS. It has nothing to do with safety, not one safety question on my exam. Anybody that can use an index can pass it. And just what does the state do with the millions of dollars they get from this program? They don't even enforce it in Calif. Do you have any idea how many non-union electricians don't bother? Ant take temp. jobs, classified as "labor". So, what do you get for the extra hassle? More pay?, job security?, steady work? more benes? The satisfaction of knowing you did a "safe" job? Another thing, with our mandatory i year warranty, what contractor is going to hire someone that don't know what they're doing?

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joebanana in Diamond Bar, California

56 months ago

Bob said: JOE BANANA your not seeing the insurance cost behind the whole thing...b4 there was no cert but there still was for hair dressers really "our" jobs are delacate and over all can cost life if done wrong...regulation is good!!!

For who?

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Mike Cason in League City, Texas

56 months ago

joebanana

I wasn't going to post to your somewhat angry post, but California seems to have a problem with letting unqualified folks perform electrical work and you just happened to live there and have a right to be upset.

I think most of us here in these forums agree that if we've done the time in apprentiship, then our time should be honored.

I know, just like everything, there are too many electrical contractors writing false time for apprentices. It would be hard for Texas to verify contractors in all of the states and would have to get a court order for employee verification from these states. We have to put that blame on the crooked contractors in every state.

We are liable for our work for several years and have to have every invoice available for an audit if requested for 4 years which I have in one nice neat book. This too is for safety. If I make a mistake on a job, the state can review my invoices and see where there may be another problem with a different job I've done. This also protects us as electrical contractors becaue if Joe Homeowner wires something later, we have proof we didn't wire it.

The landscaper or handyman in California may not have 300k in insurance that Texas requires to cover a fire or personal injury.

I carry $2,000,000.00 in coverage.

When in my apprentiship, I've fired licensed electricians who got their license somehow and couldn't wire a 3 way switch and had switch legs going from line to line.

Texas has it right with their tough licensing laws even though they didn't grandfather me when they started their program like I was promised by my congressman. I almost lost my brand new home.

Texas has also reviewed the cost of licensing and renewal fees and have reduced them because they found they could save us some money as electricians.

And by the way, there are so many illegal immigrants wiring tract home subdivisions that there are a lot of fires.

Yes, it is indeed all about public safety.

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Mike Cason in League City, Texas

56 months ago

Jason,

There is something every working apprentice or journeyman can do as they progress and change jobs.

Have your employer write a letter stating your time worked under their supervision at the time you leave the company.

I carried a USCG Merchant Marine Officer 100 ton captain's license for years, and when I had an extended trip, yacht delivery, or signifcant boat time with my crew, as the captain of the vessel I would offer to write a letter of sea time to each hand on the boat under my command if they wanted it to document their time that they would need later if they intended on getting their captain's license. I took the extra time to do that for my crews because they deserve the recognition. There were a couple of crewman who didn't do their job as they should and I would not issue that letter. We are our own keepers and need to manage our lives accordingly.
Mike

Jason in League City, Texas said: Matthew, I would like to get in touch with you and any others who have the same story here in Texas. My story is close to same as yours. It took me five months of tring to run down all the Masters I worked for in Iowa to come up with my hours. There has to be something we can do to fix this problem of out of state electricians.

Jason King

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Moving to Austin? in Sacramento, California

55 months ago

Quick question (hopefully): Considering moving to Tx. Have had my C10 for abt. 4yrs. Is it worth ANYTHING in TX (i.e. C10 in TX or licensed electrician status....)?

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steve in Katy, Texas

55 months ago

I dont know what c10 is? But to get licensed in tx u need to be aproved by the state first then take test,if you worked for 4 yrs 8000 hors u will be aproved to take journeyman test u pass it and u get ur journeyman card as far as i know thats the ony way to get licensed in TX , just go to tdlr.com print all applications and mail them in or take them in witch i did.GOOD LUCK

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Moving to Austin? in Sacramento, California

55 months ago

Apologies for the lack of clarity. A C-10 license in an electrical contractor's license. Already been through a five-year state-approved apprenticeship program, turned out, and took the law and trade tests to obtain my specialty/subcontractor electrical contractor's license. Wondering what is transferable from CA to TX.

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steve in Katy, Texas

55 months ago

not sure if anything is transferable from other states to TX. Are you trying to get ecl in Texas? All you need to have is Texas master license to get contractors license.You can call tdlr

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Moving to Austin? in Sacramento, California

55 months ago

Thanks.

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jbanana in Claremont, California

55 months ago

Mike Cason in League City, Texas said: joebanana
Here's the deal, if all these exam's are based on the NATIONAL code, why does each state feel they need their own exam? And, the fee that goes along with it. The thing with illegals wiring tract homes is an immigration problem, not an electrical one. If the thing were free, it wouldn't be as much of an inconvenience,but the cost is unrealistic, along with no benefit, except to keep your job, is creating a separate class of citizenry, those that have to pay to work, and those that don't. And, I believe there are more crooked politicians than contractors. It's funny how California has made hundreds of millions of dollars off this scam, and we electricians get to keep our jobs, how is that right?

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Moving to Austin? in Sacramento, California

55 months ago

Regulation in CA began when unions worked on politicians in order to gain control over the electrical industry - similar to the situation in Oregon. This is why our "system" mirrors that of Oregon's. CA used it as a basis in order to expedite the process AND worst case scenario, utilize Oregon's hall of electricians if a shortage ensued post regulation. The two states (and unions) were in cahoots, so to speak. The crazy thing abt. it all was that right before the signing of the bill, the union workers' (who were supposed to ALL be grandfathered in based upon the fact that all union electricians had gone through NECA's apprenticeship program and held J-cards) grandfather clause was rejected. The bill was signed and suddenly the unions were now held to the same standard. No matter whether you held a J-card (union or non) ALL electricians now had to pass the licensing test. If any electrician did not pass the licensing test prior to the deadline (which was abt. a year afterward), they would have to enroll into a state-approved apprenticeship program or leave the trade. What this had the potential to cause was a sudden shortage of electricians throughout the state, since many had been in the trade for decades and would likely take early retirement rather than go back to school or become an APRRENTICE again, but that was OK because the unions had that backup plan. The agreement with Oregon was to allow their electricians to work in CA with their OR license since it was alike/transferrable. This plan was established by the union leaders because they knew of the risk that grandfathering would be axed because it was discriminative. Sadly, the union leaders weren't really looking out for the benefit of their CA electricians and were ready and willing to bail on them and utilize Oregon's halls - pretty sad, eh? Guess that's what CA IBEW union dues were paying for-job security of Oregonians! Realizing the backlash of their "plan", they instead extended the deadline multi times

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Moving to Austin? in Sacramento, California

55 months ago

The licensing requirements are just another way of unions trying to monopolize the construction industry. PLA's are another means (see link below). Ironically, union/prevailing wages are quite higher than private work, yet our tax dollars are assigned such elevated costs - mandated. Thus, competitive pricing is less likely when wages are standardized and we tax payers get less bang for the buck than a new Walmart store. Think of all the additional projects that could be funded if wages were competitive on public projects. Construction costs overall would be lower, and we all know that construction costs directly impact inflation and the cost of living. Just because your prevailing wage check is higher doesn't mean your cost of living is going to remain as low as it has been. Eventually, cost of living will creep up to pay for that check you're cashing.
I'm not totally against unions here - they have their place in keeping it honest and fair on an employee level. For unions to be the controlling factor of govenment-funded project costs (or private, for that matter) is where I believe their power does not belong. With licensing requirements, now they are attempting to back-door the private industry. All you need to do is connect the dots...

biggovernment.com/libertychick/2010/02/01/californias-class-warfare-plas-pit-union-vs-non-union-workers-against-each-other/

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Jeff Cunningham in Asbury Park, New Jersey

55 months ago

Can anyone tell me about the New York City procedures for getting the certification to work as a journeyman. Here in New Jersey we don't have a journeyman license, only Masters. It seems as though N.Y.C. has all kinds of different licenses.
Thank You

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Larrytrick in Garland, Texas

52 months ago

Hello, I am a Master electrician from Kansas City with 14 years experience in Commercial, Industrial and some residential.

I served my apprenticship, became a Journeyman and Later a Master electrican through the national Block and Associates (the Experion). The test I took and passed in 2003 was so difficult that they changed the test because too many people were failing. Now it is all open book and they still can't pass it.

I am thinking about coming to Texas to work and know that they use this International Code that I know little about. Could someone give me an idea about the nature of the test and any pointers that may help me?

Thanks Larry

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Ken in Forney, Texas

51 months ago

Larry,

The testing procedure has changed. You first must apply with the state and pay the fee and submit your work hours before you can even get a seat for the test. The tests are now given by PSI.

If you found the Block tests to be difficult then you will also find the PSI tests to be difficult. If you need a pointer, study the code book and where the sections are. The faster you can look up answers, the better off you will be.

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joebanana in Claremont, California

51 months ago

Instead of sections, get familiar with the index, it'll save time, sections are to general. Like I've said before, anybody that can use an index can pass the exam, no previous knowledge required.

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Larrytrick in Shawnee, Kansas

51 months ago

The index to the NEC is not that helpful, are you referring to Tom Henrys Index?

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Larrytrick in Shawnee, Kansas

51 months ago

Matthew in Henderson, Texas said: I completed an electrician's apprenticeship in California through ABC (4000 hours and 4 years of school) which has an affiliate in Houston Texas and put in over 8000 journeyman hours in California. I passed the Master's Electrician test in Texas.

I am having nothing but problems trying to get a license in the state of Texas. I have sent in paperwork after paperwork proving hours, school information for over 8 months! It started with "I don't have a journeyman card" I have an apprenticeship card that you only get after completing the program. I explained it is the same as a journeyman card in Texas. I have sent in letters from the school saying I was a journeyman. I have sent in letters from employers stating I was a journeyman. I have sent in letters from the state that I received when I graduated stating that I was a journeyman. Now they are saying they don't recognize California electrical journeymen? Does anyone have any pointers on getting a license in this state besides starting all over again?

1)Secure a mailing address in the State of Texas at a mail forwarding service and make them believe you live in the State of Texas.

2) Get a lawyer if 1) doesn't work.

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wingman_g in Poway, California

51 months ago

retired electrica contractor from Virginia,Iam buying a house in Texas dose this state go by the national electric code

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Jeff Cunningham in Asbury Park, New Jersey

51 months ago

wingman_g in Poway, California said: retired electrica contractor from Virginia,Iam buying a house in Texas dose this state go by the national electric code

It's the National Electrical Code brother. It's national, the whole U.S. There are certain locations like New York City that are stricter but basically the N.E.C. is your book,ruling.

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Mike Cason in League City, Texas

51 months ago

Be careful when attempting to go around the system.

The state does an FBI background check on you and you could be subject to fines and a permanent denial of your licensing. The lawyer option to communicate with the state is your best option. The state has records of your drivers license and all sorts of easy to obtain informtion about you. I can do it too, due to the nature of another business of mine with a serivice I pay for.

As far as the reciprocating, Texas recognizes only Lousiana Masters license and Journeymans from Arkansas and Wyoming. Unless you can lawyer up and get a variance from the department, which has been futile for so many, that's your only option.

Otherwise it's 4 years as an apprentice, at least 2 years as a journeyman, approval to sit for the exam, and lastly, pass that grueling PSI exam. It is open book alright, but they look for stuff that is not in the NEC 2008 front or rear indexes. You cannot use Tom Henrys index taped in your book. I had to rip the back of my book off to sit for the exam. After finally passing, I realized it wouldn't have done me any good because you are taxed for time looking in 3 indexes that doesn't have the information PSI finds in the most remote places of the code book.
I can't tell you some of the things they ask for but I can give some good advice to help you.
Buy Tom Henry's 12 DVD set and study it well. Don't mark in the included workbook, rather using a legal pad to do your homework. Study the ohms law and know it better than your own right hand.
He gives you two or three ways to figure out the answer. Just learn one that works for you.
Study a "commercial blueprint" and learn it well, not a residential set.
I sold the Tom Henry package for $350 after I passed and threw in a Tom Henry's Masters Exam test questions book for free.($30)

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joebanana in Upland, California

51 months ago

Moving to Austin? in Sacramento, California said: The licensing requirements are just another way of unions trying to monopolize the construction industry. PLA's are another means (see link below). Ironically, union/prevailing wages are quite higher than private work, yet our tax dollars are assigned such elevated costs - mandated. Thus, competitive pricing is less likely when wages are standardized and we tax payers get less bang for the buck than a new Walmart store. Think of all the additional projects that could be funded if wages were competitive on public projects. Construction costs overall would be lower, and we all know that construction costs directly impact inflation and the cost of living. Just because your prevailing wage check is higher doesn't mean your cost of living is going to remain as low as it has been. Eventually, cost of living will creep up to pay for that check you're cashing.
I'm not totally against unions here - they have their place in keeping it honest and fair on an employee level. For unions to be the controlling factor of govenment-funded project costs (or private, for that matter) is where I believe their power does not belong. With licensing requirements, now they are attempting to back-door the private industry. All you need to do is connect the dots...

biggovernment.com/libertychick/2010/02/01/californias-class-warfare-plas-pit-union-vs-non-union-workers-against-each-other/

What do you mean eventually the cost of living will creep up to pay for that check your cashing?????
I can tell you this, 30 years experience for $15 an hour, you can keep it. If you haven't noticed non-union shops almost pay minimum wage, no bene's, want you to know everything, supply your own truck, tools, office, and think $15/hr. is a lot, your lucky if a foreman gets $20. You want to talk outrages wages(salary) look at your elected officials, with their staff, cherrywood desks, and fluff. Judges don't deserve $200+k a year.

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Moving to Austin? in La Mirada, California

51 months ago

The nice thing about merit shops is the ability to negotiate wages and benefit packages. Nothing is mandated. If you're worth it, they're apt to pay it. To expect to be paid high-dollar simply because you've been in the industry for so many years is arrogant. Contrary to the union's belief, non-union shops do provide nice benefit packages. That's one positive outcome from the union's existance/competition. Residential "ropers" is where one will find the lower wages. Training requirements to wire a residence vs. commercial/industrial projects differ - don't you agree?
Packages can many times exceed what union contractors are able to provide because: Union workers have fees/dues being taken out of their pay automatically (lowering one's wages); union contractors cannot bid competively on private projects/are at the mercy of the hall when bidding (very political system of job targeting) thus the volume of awarded projects is less = less profit; and on private work, union contractors are locked into the wage rates and packages set forth by the unions = less competitive when bidding.
Honestly, I feel for the union contrators. They are at the mercy of the union halls for bidding projects and at the mercy of the halls for their labor force. If the union wished it, they could put them out of business in a heartbeat.
In my opinion, union and merit shops are both necessary in order to keep the industry honest. When one tries to eliminate the other is when the industry can go sour. The union refers to non-union workers as "scabs". Ironically, the union came up with that term. Without scabs, we would all bleed to death, right? If the industry were union-controlled, the economy would eventually be bled to death with over-inflated construction costs. We all know that the economy cannot be sustained by government subsidies forever (prevailing wage projects). Eventually, that 70% private sector of the economy needs to pick up pace, if it can afford to do so.

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Bob in San Diego, California

51 months ago

@ moving to Austin....I do not think I deserve pay b/c I've been around along time I think I deserve pay b/c I am highly skilled craftsmen...really your going to compare the 1500 I pay in working dues and 400 in union dues...let's just call it 2k over a year...correct me if I'm wrong but that's bout mmmm 166 a month. to the 30k diff in wages between me and a non union worker(many of which I know mind you). Your brain washed buddy there is money to be made contractor and worker. I don't even see $ for my benifits come out of my check the $36/hr I make is what I make. Not all union ppl see non union as "scabs" a teacher of mine said it best "we are all (electrical) brother...some of us are just 'unorganized'"....

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Larry in Shawnee, Kansas

51 months ago

Your preaching to the choir. I too, believe that one should be paid for his abilities and skills, and I see incompentance everywhere.

These Corporations complain about not having good reliable talanted help but when someone comes along that has worked hard, developed their skills and surpass all others by becoming a Master, they don't want to pay them.

If I am expected to work for substandard pay I don't need them I can do that myself. In fact if I work for myself I can work fewer hours for the same money they want to pay me.

What really upsets me is the number of electricans that come to me to try and get me to pull permits for them. NO! I feel that if they were truly interested in the trade they would work to get their own Masters.

I worked hard for mine, they need to do the same, and if they can't pass what does that tell us? They're not qualified.

Larry

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Mike Cason in League City, Texas

51 months ago

Bravo Larry!

"I worked hard for mine, they need to do the same, and if they can't pass what does that tell us? They're not qualified."

I carry a camera and have a pen handy to write down TECL license numbers on trucks with no business name posted, their license plate, and then find the owner of the truck's registration. I try to get a pic of the driver. All of this information I turn over to the state for investigation. Too many masters are "renting out" their license # and the public is in danger. I also turn in ads for handymen doing electrical work, catch them in the act. Other contractors I know are doing the same. We are in a tough economy and this cancer is growing and it's up to us to help the state with their enforcement. They know me well in Austin at TDLR.

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Mitchell Tolbert in Austin, Texas

46 months ago

Hey guys, I'm a Master electrician here in Texas and an Instructor for the PSI exam for Electrian Testing in Austin. We travel all over the state and have written some great material that should help with your exams. Let me know if I can answer any specific questions for you guys. I also do private tutoring if anyone needs help.

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