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wilmarck benavides in Nashville, Tennessee

77 months ago

new york life insurance company it's a good place to work for?

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jrw in Strong, Maine

77 months ago

i worked for them years ago in maine and found them to be the most ethical and upstanding kind of company. a lot has to do with the managing director do you like him/her?

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JRA in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

75 months ago

I work for them in Milwaukee, coming from Ed Jones. Loved the independence of Jones, had issues with Home offices. I would still recommend Jones, though. They do tend to burn out their agents rapidly. They have a different style of training. Kind of thow you into to the fire and see if you can survive.
I went to NYL because I found them very ethical, upfront, and honest. Told me everything up front. Can you make $7500 in 6 months? If not, good bye. (Seriously, if you cannot make 7500 in 6 months, you are in the wrong business.)
But the partners (at least here) bend over backwards to teach and aid you. Plus, they take no (ZERO!) commision cut if they help, or even make, the sale.

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Melissa Clayton in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

65 months ago

JRA in Milwaukee, Wisconsin said: I work for them in Milwaukee, coming from Ed Jones. Loved the independence of Jones, had issues with Home offices. I would still recommend Jones, though. They do tend to burn out their agents rapidly. They have a different style of training. Kind of thow you into to the fire and see if you can survive.
I went to NYL because I found them very ethical, upfront, and honest. Told me everything up front. Can you make $7500 in 6 months? If not, good bye. (Seriously, if you cannot make 7500 in 6 months, you are in the wrong business.)
But the partners (at least here) bend over backwards to teach and aid you. Plus, they take no (ZERO!) commision cut if they help, or even make, the sale.

Question: "They do tend to burn out their agents rapidly." If you said a negative comment about EJ, Then why are recommending them? Please clarify your comment so we can understand why should I want to work for Edward Jones? Why did you leave them? That sounds like a conflict to me. Please clarify further!thanks

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RDickey in Texas

62 months ago

My 25 year old son has had his first interview with New York Life in Austin, Texas. I am not sure for what position but has a second interview on Monday. He was told he scored very well on some aptitude tests and is in the "A" pile of applicants. Just before this came up, he had registered to go back to complete his undergraduate degree and had taken a no pressure job at a department store that would accommodate his school schedule. He has no training for this job, seems to believe every unbelievable thing they have told him "could" come true and is seriously considering, if offered a job, quitting school again and burning his bridges at this new department store job where he is training right now. Could someone tell me the truth about why New York Life would hire someone with no education or training in this field and what the truth is about the money he is likely to make. A decision has to be made by Monday about what to do and we are on different sides of the issue to say the least. Thank you.

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peppermintpatty in Folsom, California

54 months ago

NYL Insurance Company does not keep their promises. I am still waiting to be paid by bonus from the SMT$ campaign. I qualified back in October 2009. Lets see, it's Febuary 2010!!!! Be prepared to be charged fees for using the copy machine, phones, cubicle, $300.00 training fee, etc.... be prepared to be micro-managed, monday morning coffee & so called phone clinic is a big fat joke. They will hire anyone who will pass their background check and get you to sell all your friends and family policies.

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agent nyl in Southington, Connecticut

54 months ago

peppermintpatty in Folsom, California said: NYL Insurance Company does not keep their promises. I am still waiting to be paid by bonus from the SMT$ campaign. I qualified back in October 2009. Lets see, it's Febuary 2010!!!! Be prepared to be charged fees for using the copy machine, phones, cubicle, $300.00 training fee, etc.... be prepared to be micro-managed, monday morning coffee & so called phone clinic is a big fat joke. They will hire anyone who will pass their background check and get you to sell all your friends and family policies.

You in business for yourself. NYL is a great company and phone clinic works! I setup 16 factcfinding appointments yesterday. Get out and sell and you will enjoy the fruits of your labors.

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Seatown in Lake Stevens, Washington

54 months ago

With solid prospecting skills, how much can you make at NYL?

Also, keep in mind, I am new to the insurance industry so I dont have a book of business. However, I have many years of B2B sales.

Is the pay salary + commisison, how is it broken down and what can a top performer expect to earn their first year?

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bhans

52 months ago

Basically you get your hand held for your first 3 years...and it is still insurance so it's not like you walk in and make easy money. If you're not ready to make appointments and meet with people you may want to hold off. They pay you 100% commission but the company also pays you on top of the commission for your first 3 years. Basically you get right around a 50% commission on whatever the annual premium would be even if its set up to be a monthly payment...so a 20 dollars per month check would pay an agent about 120 dollars, and then in your first year the company pays you 80% on top of that...so that's another 96 dollars. So even a cheap 20 dollar a month term policy will pay roughly 220 dollars, not bad. the second year the company pays 45% on top of your commission instead of 80 and the third year its around 26%. This is because you will eventually have a larger book of business and be able to sell with your eyes closed so you're kind of on your own. Fantastic and fun job though!

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44special in Anchorage, Alaska

52 months ago

JRA in Milwaukee, Wisconsin said: I work for them in Milwaukee, coming from Ed Jones. Loved the independence of Jones, had issues with Home offices. I would still recommend Jones, though. They do tend to burn out their agents rapidly. They have a different style of training. Kind of thow you into to the fire and see if you can survive.
I went to NYL because I found them very ethical, upfront, and honest. Told me everything up front. Can you make $7500 in 6 months? If not, good bye. (Seriously, if you cannot make 7500 in 6 months, you are in the wrong business.)
But the p

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Life Insurance Producing Machine in Chi- in chicago, Illinois

50 months ago

Mr. C in San Antonio, Texas said: I've been going through the interview process at both NY Life and Edward Jones. Any opinions on which is the better firm? A financial adviser friend of mine who works for another a completely different firm told me to go to Jones... he said the training, base pay and products were better. Anyone have any further advise? The both seem like great opportunities.

I think getting an education or training program is a great start- i started at the guardian and am now an independent broker. I love it and i dont think i would be as successful if it wasnt for the education i gleamed at the get go

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becky1 in Kharkov, Ukraine

47 months ago

hello how much does a foods company pay to market research agent in helping the food company to find partners in another country

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on the fence in New York, New York

40 months ago

Its a tough industry to say the least. The training is excellent and the pay is beneficial if you have a fast start. However its important to know the downsides which aren't disclosed when being recruited. First all the commisions you earned can and will be reversed if the client drops the policy in the first year or get declined or changes banks. There's A LOT of paperwork and a slow underwriting process that you can't control. Don't expect speedy underwriting service from your case analysts. They are on salary so they don't care about your problems. There's realistically no base salary and you only get paid a portion of the commission upfront if certian underwriting requirements are met. Prospecting is by far the hardest part of the job by far! You will be rejected all the time so if you don't have a tough skin its not for you. If you don't have any savings its not for you. If you're too emotional or comfortable in life, its not for you. Expected to pay for everything i.e. cubicle, marketing, tech support, etc etc. Have a positive attitude otherwise you'll burn out or quit within in a year. In which I might add, if you do make it, you're going to get a lion's share of income. Generally the industry only has a 15-25% success rate so as long as you stay in the game, you will get paid. They'll hire anyone as long as you can hustle and prospect. People buy insurance for thier own reasons, not for yours

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Lee in San Antonio, Texas

40 months ago

I just signed my paper work to begin a career with NYL. I am going to leave my current company where I am making about 70K a year. My NYL recruiter told me that the average first year agent makes about 63K a year. I thought to myself I can handle a small pay cut my first year in order to move up to a larger income. But after doing some research online, the average base salary for a new your life agent is 35-39K. I cannot afford to take a 30K pay cut my first year. Can anyone help shed some light on how much money you can expect to make your first year?

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on the fence in New York, New York

40 months ago

I'll say his off all the new people I work with only 10% make over 50k in their first year. If you're not a risk take this isn't for you or if you don't like starting over from scratch again. If you're already in a base salary I wouldn't recommend it unless you confidently feel as this is the right career change for you!

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Jeff in Houston, Texas

39 months ago

Going into the insurance sales "business" can be a very rewarding career decision. That being said, most people 90%+ are not suited for this position.

You will have to generate client leads (very difficult), you will have to get your licenses (Group 1, Series 6, Series 63), you will have to market in the local community (prepare to spend 5-10k), you will have to learn the sales concepts, taxation, portfolio management, etc (difficult).

Prepare to earn less than you expect for the first two years. I have moved from a carrer with NYL to selling life products to financial advisors and career agents. Many of them have been in the business for 15 years or more and earn 300k min (most on residual). These same guys started off making 30-40k for their first 5 years.

This is not a job, its a business. If you aren't business minded, save yourself the heartache and apply for another position.

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maggie in Chicago, Illinois

38 months ago

Do I need to be already licensed to start working for NYL as insurance agent?

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Jon1088 in Choudrant, Louisiana

38 months ago

maggie in Chicago, Illinois said: Do I need to be already licensed to start working for NYL as insurance agent?

Yes you are required to hold a class "c" license to actually work as an agent, but contact and begin a relationship with NYL before you try to get the license because they can help you attain it.

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maggie in Chicago, Illinois

38 months ago

this interview process with NYL is kinda time consuming 3rd interview already and it looks like 2 more; now they want credit report- how they are looking at it , do you need to have a perfect credit score?
correct me if I am wrong but at this point I feel that Im back to corporate/control world;

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Jon1088 in Choudrant, Louisiana

38 months ago

I know, the interview "get to know you" process is kind of dragged out. I think it's just because they want to know you, your goals, and how you plan on doing business. You are after-all going to be doing some serious stuff and the legal aspects of it all are huge! So they want to put you through the flame before they take the next step. That's why they required the credit check. I once worked for a company that didn't have such an arduous interview/hiring process. a young lady was hired and three months later was released upon the discovery that she had broken into the office in the night and stolen 700.00. Turns out that she had stolen money from a previous employer, so in hindsight a more in-depth selection would've certainly helped prevent a problem.

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maggie in Chicago, Illinois

38 months ago

yeah- i agree- but this is the backround check with convictions if there was theft but if you have any kinda of medical outstanding balances on your credit- how do they look at it?

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Jon1088 in Springhill, Louisiana

38 months ago

I agree, they are looking for fraud and at how financially responsible you are.

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Michelle

38 months ago

I have a interview with NYL on weds. For a assistant position and I was wondering if someone who worked there had any tips on how to do great in the interview

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snap228 in Brooklyn, New York

38 months ago

The reason they run your credit is because you can't have anything in arrears to attain the actual license you need. I just passed my test last Friday and am in classes currently for sales/product knowledge.

I wasn't licensed when I got hired, and they put me through class to get it. I'm in a position where I NEED to pay rent and can't wait much longer for commission. I just found out that you don't get any commission until going full time, even though you've made sales...which isn't something I was told from the get go. To be honest, it might have change my mind, as I had another job offer from Prudential that I turned down for NY Life. Hopefully I can hit the ground running and get all the requirements to be full time within a week. Does anyone have any input on whether or not this is realistically possible? I also have no natural market (just moved) so it's a little harder for me.

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spinner77777 in West Warwick, Rhode Island

38 months ago

what is holding you from going full time no license yet?

I am heading the same path so I would like to know

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spinner77777 in West Warwick, Rhode Island

38 months ago

What is preventing you from going full time? no license yet?

I am at the same place so i 'd like to know

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snap228 in Brooklyn, New York

38 months ago

You're considered part time until you basically make five sales, two of which have to go through. You also have to make $1750 in commission. Until all of that is met, your commission is put in an account for you with your training allowance, and you're paid when you sign your FT contract.

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Jon1088 in Farmerville, Louisiana

38 months ago

I'd say for your first selling day try this (this brought me three sales in one day)-
1. Sell to Yourself
2. Your Spouse or significant other
3. Call your best friend, sell them
Then sit down and make a list of people who know you and trust you, but do not have insurance or annuities. Call them, explain what you're doing and sell them as well.

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Jon1088 in Sarepta, Louisiana

36 months ago

CorporateHate in San Antonio, Texas said: Christ, this sounds like Primerica!
That a good thing or a bad thing?

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ray in New York, New York

36 months ago

what is the aptitude test like?

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Jon1088 in Jena, Louisiana

36 months ago

I looked up Primerica, they do seem sketchy. I've seen some pretty aggressive agents as well. It's sad when a prospective customer just becomes a commission.

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dopichi in Jakarta, Indonesia

36 months ago

Life insurance is not a choice, rather is a requirement if you want to protect your loved ones. When a person fails to take out life insurance, the loved ones often endure unwanted stress on top of the stress of burial.www.dopichi.com

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Oddmanwv in Gastonia, North Carolina

35 months ago

I'm in the interview process with NYL now and need some guidance. I have a family, two mortgages, and make about 60k salary now. Want to pursue other opportunities but also don't want the wife and son to be exposed to a lower quality of life while I build a client base if I can help it. What kind of sales would I realistically need to meet in order to hit the 60k mark in year 1?

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Elaine in Hackensack, New Jersey

35 months ago

RDickey in Texas said: My 25 year old son has had his first interview with New York Life in Austin, Texas. I am not sure for what position but has a second interview on Monday. He was told he scored very well on some aptitude tests and is in the "A" pile of applicants. Just before this came up, he had registered to go back to complete his undergraduate degree and had taken a no pressure job at a department store that would accommodate his school schedule. He has no training for this job, seems to believe every unbelievable thing they have told him "could" come true and is seriously considering, if offered a job, quitting school again and burning his bridges at this new department store job where he is training right now. Could someone tell me the truth about why New York Life would hire someone with no education or training in this field and what the truth is about the money he is likely to make. A decision has to be made by Monday about what to do and we are on different sides of the issue to say the least. Thank you.

Your son probably has a knack for sales, which no degree can teach. I know of a few non-degreed agents/advisors who are very successful. For as young as your son is, this could be a career of a lifetime. They have a wonderful training program. The best in the industry. The training, product knowledge, certifications, licenses, etc. will give him the practical and educational experience he will need to do the job. The people I speak of are actually smarter than those who have degrees working there and make the same money if not more (low to hi six figures). I have a masters degree, have been there 2 1/2 years as an advisor/agent and am transitioning into sales management. If I could have started at NYL straight out of college as an 22 year old vs. as a 39 year old, I would have done it! Don't knock it. It's a performance based business. You only have to be 18 years old to sell life insurance.

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T. in Brandon, Mississippi

34 months ago

To the guy above, With his son considering the position, it is an incredible opportunity that not many people take simply because everyone knows someone who has failed. Yes, it is a high Risk job, but it also has the highest reward: you get to offer one of the most important, life changing financial tools ever created, and all the while you are your own boss with your own goals to meet and your own time to work. No career in the world can offer something that could possibly promise people security for generations, and give you the time to enjoy your own life as you please. I am 26 years old, and I am in my fifth year in the life insurance business. I have made six figures plus since year one, when I was 22, and this year I will make 200k. Of course, I work my tail off, but as long as I consistently meet with the people I care to do business with, I will always make plenty of money. I have never been told what to do, once. I have never been required to work office hours, and I have never worked for anyone but myself. On top of that, I know for a fact that what I am offering to my clients leaves them financially safer than when I found them. I know that if something happens to them unexpectedly, their children will go to college and finish school without worrying about something as trivial as money. And I know that when they have lived a long life, they will leave their heirs with a legacy that was created with pennies on the dollar- life insurance. In my career, you must operate and exist with the mind of an entrepreneur, and you must have confidence in your work ethic. If your son possesses these qualities, he will do very well. If he does not, I recommend something else. One thing I know for sure- this is my career for life. I might not be able to save your life, but I can save your dignity. I love what I do, and despite the previous comments, I know that my products MDRT ANAHEIM services are helping people. There is no question about that. Good luck!

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T. in Brandon, Mississippi

34 months ago

To the guy above, With his son considering the position, it is an incredible opportunity that not many people take simply because everyone knows someone who has failed. Yes, it is a high Risk job, but it also has the highest reward: you get to offer one of the most important, life changing financial tools ever created, and all the while you are your own boss with your own goals to meet and your own time to work. No career in the world can offer something that could possibly promise people security for generations, and give you the time to enjoy your own life as you please. I am 26 years old, and I am in my fifth year in the life insurance business. I have made six figures plus since year one, when I was 22, and this year I will make 200k. Of course, I work my tail off, but as long as I consistently meet with the people I care to do business with, I will always make plenty of money. I have never been told what to do, once. I have never been required to work office hours, and I have never worked for anyone but myself. On top of that, I know for a fact that what I am offering to my clients leaves them financially safer than when I found them. I know that if something happens to them unexpectedly, their children will go to college and finish school without worrying about something as trivial as money. And I know that when they have lived a long life, they will leave their heirs with a legacy that was created with pennies on the dollar- life insurance. In my career, you must operate and exist with the mind of an entrepreneur, and you must have confidence in your work ethic. If your son possesses these qualities, he will do very well. If he does not, I recommend something else. One thing I know for sure- this is my career for life. I might not be able to save your life, but I can save your dignity. I love what I do, and despite the previous comments, I know that my products MDRT ANAHEIM services are helping people. There is no question about that. Good luck!

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Kevin in Kingston, Rhode Island

32 months ago

Kunal Agarwal in Jersey City, New Jersey said: I have 2 interviews with them one is tomorrow and other is on Friday both are for different position...Can anyone through a light is it easy to crack the interview with them or what inner they look from a candidate...!

I am going into my third interview with them today and it appears it is going extremely well. They mentioned that they liked my go getter attitude. However NY Life has many different management styles depending on the office you are applying for. They want you to shoot for the stars and bust your butt to reach them. Able to learn and able to conform to their style.

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Kevin in Kingston, Rhode Island

32 months ago

Kunal Agarwal in Jersey City, New Jersey said: I have 2 interviews with them one is tomorrow and other is on Friday both are for different position...Can anyone through a light is it easy to crack the interview with them or what inner they look from a candidate...!

I am going into my third interview with them today and it appears it is going extremely well. They mentioned that they liked my go getter attitude. However NY Life has many different management styles depending on the office you are applying for. They want you to shoot for the stars and bust your butt to reach them. Able to learn and able to conform to their style.

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josh.. in Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania

31 months ago

Anyway, life insurance agents will push for all this, even if you're single, because they think you'll eventually get married and have kids.

I for one rather do this: Get stinking rich doing a business of your own and you'll eventually have more than what you have as a policy. Insurance companies are not your friends, they just want your money. They could care less about what you have, as long as you pay for it (over the preferred payments). Why do you think some insurance companies either flop or wack many employees when a catastrophe hits them (hurricanes, tornadoes, droughts, famine, diseases that are over the top)? They lose money. And with all the BS that's going on: jobless rates going up, global warming threatening society as a whole, and people relying more on medicine, it's no wonder they are pushing hard.

If you're single, get rich first off your business or whatever it is you do, don't get married or have kids, then decide if life insurance is right for you after you make it. Don't be like these fumbling idiots who think love is cost free...it isn't. Your wife is expensive and so are the kids, that's why she's locked you in. And if you did marry her, but didn't have kids, and think she was the one, but later find out she's a witch from hell, get a divorce. Less expensive.

Wow we have someone on this website who literally bases their life around not having to get life insurance...your get rich fantasy is a little farfetched, you make it seem effortless to get rich quick, and your actually telling people not to get married or have kids just do they dont have to get life insurance.. what a joke..

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josh.. in Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania

31 months ago

and all the while you are your own boss with your own goals to meet and your own time to work. No career in the world can offer something that could possibly promise people security for generations, and give you the time to enjoy your own life as you please. I am 26 years old, and I am in my fifth year in the life insurance business. I have made six figures plus since year one, when I was 22, and this year I will make 200k. Of course, I work my tail off, but as long as I consistently meet with the people I care to do business with, I will always make plenty of money. I have never been told what to do, once. I have never been required to work office hours, and I have never worked for anyone but myself. On top of that, I know for a fact that what I am offering to my clients leaves them financially safer than when I found them. I know that if something happens to them unexpectedly, their children will go to college and finish school without worrying about something as trivial as money. And I know that when they have lived a long life, they will leave their heirs with a legacy that was created with pennies on the dollar- life insurance. In my career, you must operate and exist with the mind of an entrepreneur, and you must have confidence in your work ethic. If your son possesses these qualities, he will do very well. If he does not, I recommend something else. One thing I know for sure- this is my career for life. I might not be able to save your life, but I can save your dignity. I love what I do, and despite the previous comments.

T, Brandon, Mississippi: Could you give me your e-mail address or another way I can contact you, I would give you mine on here but it is my full name I dont need everyone having it. I'm starting my interview process with NY Life and after reading your post it just inspired me even more to get into the field, if you dont mind I would like to ask you some questions because I feel as though I'm in the same position you were in. Thanks.

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Big cheese in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

30 months ago

CorporateHate in San Antonio, Texas said: Again, that's IF you have a family siblings. If you're just a 25 year old with no kids, no life tied to others, other than your own, life insurance is a waste ~ and that applies to somebody who already has a well-off family. He might also be someone who will decide that kids will not be a part of his life. Even if he decides to knock-up some girl from Brazil and have kids, Term life insurance is still the best and cheapest choice. It's just that simple...don't make it too complicated or you'll start to sound like an agent~ lol

Getting it when your young is the best whether you have a family or not. Friend of mine just got married and applied for life insurance withe the same company I did only a year later and over that year started having chest pains and he is 24. Found out he had developed a heart defect that gets worse as you age and now he is uninsurable. He totally regrets not buying when I did but that was his choice and now he lives with it and hopefully someone will take a chance on insuring him but he been through several companies and no takers yet.

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James Luck in Miami, Florida

30 months ago

Hello T Brandon. I also would like your email address so I can ask you some questions as well when it comes to NYL. I'm in my third process with the company.

Thanks ina advance and hope to talk to you soon.

financialeducation10@gmail.com

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Mike in Santa Monica, California

29 months ago

Lee in San Antonio, Texas said: I just signed my paper work to begin a career with NYL. I am going to leave my current company where I am making about 70K a year. My NYL recruiter told me that the average first year agent makes about 63K a year. I thought to myself I can handle a small pay cut my first year in order to move up to a larger income. But after doing some research online, the average base salary for a new your life agent is 35-39K. I cannot afford to take a 30K pay cut my first year. Can anyone help shed some light on how much money you can expect to make your first year?

Did you make it? How are you doing if you did?

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anon in Brooklyn, New York

29 months ago

Well you've done your research and you're right, the first year agents average about 35k a year. I was an agent for 3 years after just recently departing and I can tell you that after the first year two thirds of my recruiting/training class had already left the business and only 10% made more then 40k that year. Personally I would never leave a 70k salary to jump into a new career unless I was damn sure that I had enough contacts to make it with a 35-50k average income those first years. Its hard and most certainly isn't for everyone. I guess those who do survive make the lions share since I did see few people pulling in 6 and 7 figure incomes.

Good Luck!

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Mike in Santa Monica, California

29 months ago

if you are in the business and are "successful" how many policies do you sell a week. If you are in the business and you are struggling--how many policies do you sell per week? How many contacts or potential contacts do you or did you have your first year? I have a large pool to start with--well over 200 people--is that sufficient?

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monup158l in Alpharetta, Georgia

29 months ago

Life insurance

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Jq83 in Tulsa, Oklahoma

28 months ago

CorporateHate in San Antonio, Texas said: Again, that's IF you have a family siblings. If you're just a 25 year old with no kids, no life tied to others, other than your own, life insurance is a waste ~ and that applies to somebody who already has a well-off family. He might also be someone who will decide that kids will not be a part of his life. Even if he decides to knock-up some girl from Brazil and have kids, Term life insurance is still the best and cheapest choice. It's just that simple...don't make it too complicated or you'll start to sound like an agent~ lol

Term, regardless is more expensive if you do wait till your older and you knock up that chick from Ukraine instead of the chick from Brazil, that's your first mistake. would you rather pay $15 or $50 every month for 30 years? To top it off, since you now are with a chick who gives you migrants, stress, and other physical health issues like kids, you may not be able to qualify for ANY life insurance period.

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EducateYourself in Salt Lake City, Utah

27 months ago

CorporateHate in San Antonio, Texas said: Again, that's IF you have a family siblings. If you're just a 25 year old with no kids, no life tied to others, other than your own, life insurance is a waste ~ and that applies to somebody who already has a well-off family. He might also be someone who will decide that kids will not be a part of his life. Even if he decides to knock-up some girl from Brazil and have kids, Term life insurance is still the best and cheapest choice. It's just that simple...don't make it too complicated or you'll start to sound like an agent~ lol

You are speaking as if a whole life insurance policy is the only thing that is being offered here. If you (the policy-holder) understand the power and abilities that you have with your whole life insurance policy, you would know that through proper funding of your policy, you can take loans out against your policy and essentially become your own bank. Granted, this will take a good junk of change to do, but after the first 7 years of over-funding your policy (paying more then your premium), you will have the ability to take out loans for autos, business, homes, equipment etc. if you pay back your loan (plus interest) to your policy. In doing so, you will also receive both the interest (interest of which would have gone to creditors) and dividends (dividends of which would have gone to stock holders of banks) associated with the loan. A whole life insurance policy should really be called, "The Best Banking System with a Death Benefit as an added bonus."

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Sprint56 in Woodstock, Georgia

3 months ago

I have also had m third interview with NYL. I have heard that it is a good company to work for, but I am concerned about when I get paid since I have been out of work for over a year. I have no savings and I am apprehensive about how long it's going to take for me to make some money. Someone mentioned that you need to have some money saved because it will take a while to get paid. I was told that in addition to making $55,000 my first year, that I would also receive $36,000 in training pay. When I called to set up an appointment to start training to get my license, I was told that I had to pay out of my pocket and then NYL would reimburse me. I thought since I was told that I would make $36,000 in training pay, that meant that NYL was paying for the licensing. Not sure what to do now.

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