Starting out...

Get new comments by email
You can cancel email alerts at anytime.
Comments (43)

Host

How did you get your start doing interior designer work, and what career moves did you make to get to your current position?

Do you need a particular educational background?

Reply - Report abuse

Cacey in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

88 months ago

My first freelance job I had out of school was actually from my internship at Bombay Company, its a Furniture and Home Decor store. I was an Assistant Manager at the time.A customer came into the store and I started asking simple open ended questions like a (client questionaire) and the conversation took off from there. I went to her home and sketched out a few ideas, got some of her ideas then did some research. After a few more meetings I re-spaced planned her living room, dining room and foyer. It was a great....I loved it and it was really informal and relaxing. The key to get experiance is to just be open and take control you no what your doing for the most part, yes there might be some things you arn't sure of but your client knows that your still a student. In this case it was my first job per say...so I did not charge, she offered and I replied "It was a great experiance to work for you, any time". I did just graduate with my BA from the Art Institute of Pgh, my client did no that I was in my 2nd year at AIP. Im currently in the process of finding a job in Hawaii.

Hope this helps a little...
Cacey

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (15) / No (8) Reply - Report abuse

Julie Cregger in New Market, Maryland

76 months ago

Rebecca Gomez in Lees Summit, Missouri said: I primarily do builder work since that is my major relationship but it spured off into individuals homes. Though exposure in model homes, I was approached by a high end furniture and accessory store to help teach a design 101 course. It also increased my exposure. .

I am about to complete my BFA in Interior Architecture & Design and am interested in doing residential design for model homes.
What steps should I take to progress in that way?

Thanks!
Julie

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (22) / No (5) Reply - Report abuse

Kevin in Boston, Massachusetts

76 months ago

Thank you for your response. Do you ever work for homeowners directly and I would ask the same question - example: Living Room redo (average hours involved and how much client will pay on average)? Or just to help them "accessorize" and go shopping with them? Or any other common scenarios?

Thank you,
Kevin

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (8) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

Leisa Washington in Washington, District of Columbia

74 months ago

Hi Rebecca!

I am looking to change careers.

I find myself looking at the programs on HGTV and decided to jot down what I am most drawn to. I am interested in becoming an Interior color assistant "if there is such a title" or maybe a kitchen or bath designer. I do like interior design but I am more interested in the color scheme and kitchen and bath design.

Can you give me some direction or suggestions on part time jobs, internships, classes etc... I am at a total loss.

Thank you for any assistance/direction you are able to give.

Leisa

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (63) / No (8) Reply - Report abuse

Christina in Denver, Colorado

71 months ago

Thanks so much for all your great feedback Rebecca! I am a color consultant and am looking to take my work to a bigger level and work with builders, school projects, etc. vs. just home owners.Any advice on how to get builders attention when i first contact them so I don't get the non-response or "that sounds great we'll keep you in mind"line? Thanks in advance and so glad I cam across this. Best of luck!!!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (9) / No (11) Reply - Report abuse

Christina in Denver, Colorado

71 months ago

Thanks so much for the great suggestions. I focus on paint color consulting more than anything so it's pretty straight forward in terms of selecting colors and working with their painters. Thanks again and hadn't even thought of wman owned builders! Great idea!!!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

katrina in Los Angeles, California

70 months ago

Jorji in Brisbane, Australia said: Doing a course is a good idea here is a link that is worth a look. www.lifestylelearningdirect.com/

hi jorji! i was just wondering, have you tried the lifestylelearningdirect.com website? you think it's worth the money taking classes with this online school? for interior designers, is it possible to be one just getting courses off from online schools? i would like to go back to school and get interior designs, i have no idea where to start, please help... any advice, do you know of any school that is not too expensive? thank you

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (12) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

katrina in Los Angeles, California

70 months ago

Rebecca Gomez in Lees Summit, Missouri said: Christina-
Yes, I would offer to do the first model for almost free so that they can see your work, you have to cover your gas & childcare expenses of course. Tell them you would normally charge X but I am willing to waive my time, just need to cover my expenses. And then give it your all! At least the first model you do, it seems after that, word of mouth spreads and you will get more work and then you can charge whatever you wish.

Also, I am a female business owner, I found that there are female home builders, or superintendents who value that. I find that they are the most willing to take a chance. Play up that you will have so much fun shopping together. :)

And of course, showing them your portfolio is a great idea, too.
Be enthusiastic & confident and they will want to use your services.
Good luck!

hi rebecca, i am interested in getting interior design classes, online mainly. i just dont know how or where to start. do you have any advice? please help...

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (12) Reply - Report abuse

Marguerite, Manalapan, NJ in Englishtown, New Jersey

70 months ago

Dear Rebecca -

Thanks so much for sharing. Your insights are greatly valued as is your time & ability to share / mentor others.

Thank you & much success!
Marguerite

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (12) Reply - Report abuse

SunshineDesign in Palm Beach, Florida

70 months ago

To Ms. Gomez - You may get by in that bastian of design prominance known as Missouri without a design degree, but you would not be able to practice interior design in any state of consequence, say, Florida, New York, California, known for setting design trends without a design degree. I'm sure the builder you won your little award from wasn't Toll Brothers or even in the game with the K. Hovnanian's of the trade. Many people are good with colors and fabrics, that doesn't make them a designer and you are misleading those Dolly Decorators out there like you who think they can seriously make it without a design education. Shame on you.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (24) / No (18) Reply - Report abuse

Adam in Vista, California

70 months ago

I agree with SushineDesign that it is different in larger metropolitan cities, but Sunshine, you should be a little nicer. Remember, some of the most renowned artists, musicians and businessmen have no formal education. And there are more that have the education but have no ability to design whatsoever. Skill is skill, education just speeds up the honing of those skills if you have them.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (20) / No (7) Reply - Report abuse

Adam in Valencia, California

70 months ago

Sunshine,
I have a design degree and am a designer in Southern California, so I am well aware of current trends, industry protocol and the dangers of portraying oneself as a professional when not. But I have always been disgusted by people's validation by a title obtained through a degree or other eduaction. I also never said she was Picasso or Monet but who's to say she isn't without seeing her work? It is not her responsibility to warn these prospective designer's of all the dangers of the industry. That's their responsibility while researching careers. I recall being in the 2nd or 3rd day of a figure drawing class a long time ago. I leaned over to see the student's work next to me. It was beautiful. Elegant and with a correctness and likeness rarely seen by students in similar classes. I complimented him on his work and asked how long he had been an artist. He replied, "I am not an artist. This is my first drawing class ever. I am a math major". I would contend that he is an artist. Don't be a hater.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (16) / No (13) Reply - Report abuse

SunshineDesign in Palm Beach, Florida

69 months ago

I never implied what your worldly & life experiences with tile was or was not. Your travelogue has nothing to do with the establishment of ones right to refer to themself as an interior designer, which was my subject on here. You & Adam must know each other. Both of you try to your justify your arguments on the emotional, not on thoughtful intellect & assessment of the objective facts in addition to the subjective.

I'd be happy to compare my projects & yearly billing, & that of my Palm Beach colleagues, with yours any day of the week. You spin reasons & motives for my statements & your evaluation of my personal level of happiness to deflect from your own operations. Now, hmmmmm, is that a professional evaluation on my happiness and motives....oh, no, I guess not, you sited, "I read once about this type of person in Wired Magazine, they are unhappy, insecure and this is their one place in the world to be superior and put others down." I'm sure the American Academy of Psychology checks with this techno magazine before formulating their opinions. We all know how Wired Magazine is looked up to in the world of personality assessment. Why, it's the bible on the workings & motives of the human mind. Who needs facts when we have Wired to turn to for a through assessment of someone based on 3 blog postings. Are you serious!?

Rebecca, just a little more insight for you, I have been President of my ASID chapter & for 3 years was Design Coordinator for our "Multi Millions Street of Dreams Homes," which included 4 homes valued at 1.5 million or more. That's how much I am disliked by others & feel the need to be superior on a blog site.

My advice is go to school & get an education to be what you obviously aspire to be instead of trying to take the easy way
& hope nothing happens to expose your lack of credentials. There is nothing wrong with being a fish in a small pond. The problem comes in when you must come up for air because you are not really a fish.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (14) / No (14) Reply - Report abuse

Adam in San Marcos, California

69 months ago

For the record Sunshine, me and Rebecca do not know each other.
On the note of income and expensive homes... The amount you bill may indicate your ability to sell and in fact be a decent designer (nobody is arguing that you are not), but 1.5 million... Wow. Thats a lot of money... Half my career has been in Los Angeles where 1.5 million doesn't even buy the dirt to build a home on, besides paying a designer to design and furnish it.
But even my experience designing 3 million dollar lofts on Sunset and 15 million dollar ranches in Malibu doesn't give me the right to be grandiose and annoying. I started designing small interiors and eventually worked my way up the ranks and into more interesting and challenging projects. It was hard and I have become a better designer over the years. I do agree that it is not professional to self promote as something you are not, but I laugh at the things I designed right out of school and I was a "designer". My experience has taught me what I know, not the classes I took in school. They helped and got the ball rolling, but real work is where I learned and probably even yourself.
Rebecca may not have the formal education in design but I doubt she is an idiot. She obviously has the intellect to run a successful business and if she is doing bad design or something illegal, it will catch up with her. If not, let the market decide whether she is a talented designer.
Until then, let's be agree to disagree. Best of luck to you.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (21) / No (9) Reply - Report abuse

Christina Lubel in Hollywood, Florida

69 months ago

Sunshine-

Wow.. I came into this forum to learn some backround information on the field of interior design and I am saddened to see that there are people in this field that have nothing better to do than to humilate and bash other people. Sunshine, you must be sitting behind your computer enjoying the drama you are attemping to cause. But truth is; if you are even really a designer as you say you are you must be the most tackiest, low class one of the bunch. As a student and future interior designer I have learned nothing from you, and thank you. In terms of actually holding a conversation in this forum thank you Rebecca and Adam for sharing what you have experienced. I am guessing that Sunshine has had a really bad day or maybe even bad week for that matter. Sunshine you seem to have some more growing up to do, I suggest you get some psychological help. At no point in time was Rebecca ever saying anything demeaning, all she was getting at was her experiences, As an outsider to this conversation did I ever think she was trying to show "Dolly Decorators" as you stated an easy way in. How absurd! Also no need to elaborate on your choice of wording as if you are above anyone we get it... you are uneducated and have no class.
Sunshine, before you decide to judge others, evaluate yourself first. Out of all the people that have posted in this forum, you seem like you have the most learning to do. Back to basics honey.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (13) / No (12) Reply - Report abuse

DP in New York, NY in Brooklyn, New York

69 months ago

I am interested in changing careers into interior design. The type of job I'm thinking of is on an interiors team at larger, commercial, architectural firm. I am doing my due dilligence into schools, programs, and degrees. I need some advice regarding the ratio of level of education to job opportunity/income. I assume that a Masters Degree would be the safest degree to obtain so as to leave as many doors open as possible. However, the New York State requirements for certification only reference a combination of 2 years school and 5 years experience. Could I have just as many options open to me with an AAS in Interior Design + work experience. I guess what my basic question is is this: If I am state certified (by any means of obtaining through NYS rules) does it matter if I have an AAS or an MFA? If anyone knows the answer to this I would REALLY appreciate their advice. Especially if they were to know what types of candidates would work for a Gensler or a Leo A Daly etc.... Best regards to all! This forum seems to be a great resource!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (9) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Adam in San Marcos, California

69 months ago

Rebecca,
I started about 15 years ago in the interior design industry an
Before that when I was in my early 20's I had been building cabinets and doing finish carpentry. That was great experience that has served me well as a designer. I started designing and fabricating furniture for clients during that time. It was great but I realized that I could only design and make so many pieces of furniture without ramping up and becoming a manufacturer. I was interested in staying small so I got my degree and started out into the interior design world. I continued making furniture but offered complete design services while working under a friend who had been a designer for a number of years. Eventually I made the switch to just interior design 2 or 3 years later. Like everyone, I started out doing anything I could get my hands on and did it for next to nothing. But as my career progressed I started finding more opportunities to design some really fun and innovative homes and offices. Most of my work typical residential remodels. There isn't much land in Southern California that hasn't been built up already. I'd say 70% is remodels. The rest has been commercial and new construction. It's been a long haul. I have paid my dues as a designer. I work hard to keep myself abreast on the industry and products. And I just try to love what I do. That's when I do good work and come home happy. The market has slowed and effected my work. Don't believe anyone that says that it hasn't, even in LA.
But there is still plenty of work available. You just have to be creative and find new ways to promote yourself.
It's good to see level headed designer's out there that are happy for other's success. I have always figured that if you are good at what you do, you will be successful. If not, work harder or find another career. That's my advise to all those looking to enter any industry. Best of luck to you.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (10) / No (6) Reply - Report abuse

Melissa Chino hilla, California in Lancaster, California

69 months ago

hello my name is melissa and my major is interior design i will be attending FIDM in jan.2009. i wanted to see if i can start an unpaid internship just to get my feet in the door. where would i start off at or who should be talking too.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Jeanette in Eastern Iowa in Bellevue, Iowa

69 months ago

Hi, Melissa

When I interned I went back home and asked some of the local stores. I ended up interneing at a furniture store. It was alright I just don't feel I learned as much as I could have. I wish I had thought of looking at larger places and thought out of the box.

If nothing comes to you open up the phone book. See what design firms are in the area, or smaller boutiques that let you express your creative spirit. But since you are just starting school it would be wise to find something that won't eat up a lot of your time. Believe me time matters when getting school projects in before the deadlines.

Best of luck and I hope that you find a place that you are happy with.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Patti in Harry's Town in Independence, Missouri

69 months ago

Hi everyone - came across this message board and am really glad I did! Rebecca, I live not far from you. Your info and Adam's info is very much appreciated! I'm currently taking nursing pre-req's in college (I'm 46 yrs. YOUNG), had been in life insurance for 10 yrs. but lost my job in June, but all my life I've been drawn (pun intended) to art. Lately I've been watching and reading about interior design. 5 yrs. ago after much planning, I redid my bathroom and have received so many compliments on it - I really loved doing that project, albeit very small and in a rental home with no permission to do anything "drastic". I'm kind of obsessed with design and architectural elements and artistic aspects of nature, and have taken an art history course. I too love the Plaza - for the architecture, not the shopping, especially the Nelson-Atkins Museum! I plan to take continuing ed courses at the Kansas City Art Institute, esp. furniture design, but know that even when I have my LPN or RN, I'll be going back to school to study design and art. How does one find part-time work as an assistant to a designer? Would love to have the opportunity to learn, and once I'm employed in the nursing field, would not worry about pay scale as an assistant, "go-for", helper, paint roller cleaner, cleaning staff, etc., just the chance to watch a pro and learn on my days off. They're building a new "big box" home improvement store very near my home and I though about applying for a job there, just to be around people in the design/contracting industries and the products. Any suggestions or thoughts for an older newbie getting a really late start, with a big desire to learn??

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (7) Reply - Report abuse

Kristen in Santa Barbara, California

69 months ago

For what it's worth I am in my first semester at an interior design AA program here. I have already come across the possibility of internships for a huge hospitality design firm here and am going to meet with an interior designer of high-end homes to interview her about her career. I recommend this: I was amazed that I just had to e-mail her and she was willing to meet and talk with 'lil old me. Best of luck to all!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

eagerbeaver24 in Sydney, Australia

68 months ago

I wanna be an interior designer too, and I've researched on how to get started, what courses to take, where to enroll and etc. So far, I find the home-based interior designing course very suitable for a busy girl like me.

But can you guys please tell me if this course: www.inst.org/ID/become.htm
is ok or do I really have to enroll in a prestigious college? please help me.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

FL Native in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

65 months ago

Adam, I am sure everyone here can benefit from your words of wisdom and professionalism.

Christina in Hollywood (neighbor!) I wish you the best of luck in school and afterwards!

Eagerbeaver, most schools offer night classes so you may find some to take eventually.

Christina, find your niche where you live, and get the necessary training.
Good luck!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (6) Reply - Report abuse

designer in Los Angeles, California

65 months ago

DP in New York:
As a ex-gensler, I can tell you that you do not need a Master degree to become an Interior Designer. Unless, you are going for a Master degree in Architecture.

B.S. or B.A degree from a accredited school will serve you well. With applicable professional experience, you will be eligible to apply for NCIDQ and your state certification.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (6) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

AprilAries in Fort Worth, Texas

63 months ago

I, too, would love to obtain a degree in Interior Design. I have applied and been accepted to an accredited university to get a BS in ID. My only concern is my age - almost 40. I know I'm not that old, however, I also know it takes time to build a portfolio, reputation, etc. in this field, and by the time I graduated I would be between 45-50. Would I stand a chance of ever making decent money in Design?

Also, I live in and would be working in Dallas, which is definitely not Chicago, LA or New York, but there is a large Design community here.

Thank you so much!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

designmamma in Boston, Massachusetts

62 months ago

I am a student and freelance designer in Boston. We just had a baby and are looking to move to another city closer to friends and family once I finish my degree. Can I expect to enjoy a good interior design career in Southern Florida, Detroit Metro or Pittsburgh Pa? These areas are our options and we are having a tough time deciding. I don't want my career to be limited nor my creativity (I am already aware that concessions must be made to client preference).
Thanks,
Brandi

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (3) Reply - Report abuse

Tatiana Hisel in Vienna, Virginia

61 months ago

AprilAries in Fort Worth, Texas said: I, too, would love to obtain a degree in Interior Design. I have applied and been accepted to an accredited university to get a BS in ID. My only concern is my age - almost 40. I know I'm not that old, however, I also know it takes time to build a portfolio, reputation, etc. in this field, and by the time I graduated I would be between 45-50. Would I stand a chance of ever making decent money in Design?

Also, I live in and would be working in Dallas, which is definitely not Chicago, LA or New York, but there is a large Design community here.

Thank you so much!

Hi, April! Think of it this way: you will be 45 and 50 whether you become an interior designer or not. Wouldn't it be so much better if you did make your dream come true? I am 38 and 3 semesters away from my B.F.A. in Interior Architecture and Design. Yes, I do think about graduating when I am over forty, but, for whatever its worth I am the happiest I have ever been, knowing I will get to design interiors for the rest of my life. From the practical stand point, NOW is the great time to BE in school - by the time I am done, the economy will pick up and it will be easier to find that first design job:)
I attend Academy of Art University online. It is the ONLY online program in the nation that is accredited by CIDA. The price tag is very steep but well worth it, as the curriculum is rigorous academically and emotionally.
I wouldn't have it any other way:)
The best of luck to you!

Tatiana

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (5) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Julian in Toronto, Ontario

61 months ago

April/Tatiana

I find myself in the exact same situation. I am 34 and contemplating a career change, I have never catered to my creative side - interior design is what comes naturally to me - I close my eyes and can conceptualize the space to the finest detail. What scares me too is my age, I would also be close to 40 and have the same legitimate concerns as to potential earnings and realistic expectations. How did you research your decision, I don't even know what an entry level position entail.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Julian

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

EB in San Diego, California

61 months ago

This is a late comment but after reading everything I am discusted but understand.
Designers are very sensitive when it comes to their profession. An interior decorater is often times refered to as an interior designer. An that really causes rage in people that have took the time to get the degree and put in all the hard work. Designers do more than color schemes and textile choices. Actually, thats a small part of it. The programming and schematics, the job binders and specification!
Designers really have to know everything about everything! First the interviewing process in programming, the pre-design work, matrix after matrix, the math, the space planning.And then draw it up. And then specify it. And then order it. And god, working with the contractors....Geez, Xanax time.
Really, when you work for a design firm you are going to specialize in something like elevations, CAD, rendering, perspectives, boards, lighting, "green" patrol, ect...
Those people trying to humiliate and degrade you should be encouraging you to be a Real designer. A contributor to justifing our profession. Becoming anything starts with interest and you obviously have it. Just know that Interior Design work is the most stressful work you can do. You don't have to be crazy to be an interior designer....but it helps!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (7) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

EB in San Diego, California

61 months ago

Jullian,
I didn't get my degree until I was 30. I know that is still younger than you but when you go to school you will find that its the more matured student that does will in interior design.
It is very stressful. More work than you can even imagine.!!! I can't stress that enough.
But if your thinking of the entry level salary I won't lie to you. It's not great. As a junior designer your looking at 35-50 K a year. But you also have student loans to pay back.
Moonlighting outside of your firm that you work for is helpfull and you can see those large checks in your name.
Don't be afraid of the age though. You can find a program that is about 3 1/2 years. And 3 1/2 years from now you can be graduating or you can be afraid! Your choice!!!!!!!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (6) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Deelybob in Jacksonville, Florida

61 months ago

Start at Thomasville or a retail design company. Great training and introduction with the chance to make decent money.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (6) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

Deelybob in Jacksonville, Florida

61 months ago

Just to let everyone know up front. I know SunshineDesign personally.
And, Adam, FYI those projects she did that you knocked for only being 1.5 million were done in 1996! She probably gave up trying to explain anything. In today's market those home are more like 5 - 9 million bro. You that are on here reading her posts may not like how she said it, but she was telling the straight story. She is a hugely respected and liked designer with many high profile clients, though blunt, I'll agree.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (7) / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

davis8362@bellsouth.net in Decatur, Georgia

61 months ago

Do anyone know where I can find a job as an interior designer or something close to that field I just graduated in May 2009. Thanks for any lead.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (5) Reply - Report abuse

JonesBoys

58 months ago

Host said: How did you get your start doing interior designer work, and what career moves did you make to get to your current position?

Do you need a particular educational background?

I am currently designing a tool to help Interior Designers and am looking for some help. The tool will be free of charge and will allow designers to upload photos of their projects, have them reviewed for possible building mistakes, search for professionals, find Materials easily, and post questions to building professionals. I have a website programmer, a marketing specialist and a printing shop that has offered discounts to help designers promote themselves, some of the deals they are offering are amazing. I have a few “seasoned designers” and contractors helping me in my project however I feel some of them have forgotten the obstacles they faced when they were freshly graduating from school.
I am wondering if anyone has any suggestions that would help me design this tool? things to add? things I should remove?
I can be contacted directly at mgpsrvcs@aol.com
Jonathan

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

adi_muhyan in Jakarta, Indonesia

54 months ago

I need to know about job in interior company

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

QCdesign in Ottawa, Ontario

54 months ago

There are many of you who commented above who are contemplating career changes. Turning your passion for decorating into a profitable career is very possible.

It is important to keep in mind that you can have a successful and fulfilling career in either interior decorating or design. Which option is better for you can depend on many things and the best way to decided is to conduct research on both options and make an informed decision.

Although interior decorating is not as heavily regulated as interior design, completing a certification program is extremely beneficial. Often you may find yourself entering a room and know immediately that something about the décor is off but you can’t seem to find the words to express it. A training program will give you the technical background to confidently address client’s decorating needs in a professional manner. This is just one of the many benefits associated with receiving professional training.

One last thing to keep in mind is that age should never be a limitation. Having a fulfilling career in design or decorating is just as possible in your 20s as it is in your 40s, or even 50s for that matter. It’s never too late to start!
I would be happy to chat further about decorating/career options or training, please feel free to email me at info@qcdesignschool.com
Marina-QC Design School www.qcdesignschool.com

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (6) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

SimSim in Cape Town, South Africa

37 months ago

I am interested in furniture design ie baths, lounge furniture etc, but i have no idea of where to start or even how. i studied hospitality and accounts, so i have no design or drawing skills. Can anyone suggest how to go about getting these ideas from my head to an piece of furniture?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Faz in Cape Town, South Africa

34 months ago

Hi All,

If anyone has advice on how i can move from interior design to working at a magazine. I have a National Diploma in Interior Design
but my passion is photography and graphic design. I was thinking a career at a magazine would probably be like the best of both worlds for me. Im a creative person, and enjoy multi-tasking and getting creative. I would like to be able to use my Interior Design skills as well.
I started doing fashion styling for some of my photography friends, and that has been amazing. I have no clue about working at a magazine,
if anyone could maybe clear up the different positions a magazine has and what i could fall into. Something that involves a bit of everything.

Thank you n advance

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

srg in Mineral Wells, Texas

31 months ago

Sunshine - woa! I also looked into this forum to get a little insight about interior design and was flat out shocked at your pompous attitude....I didn't realize people like you REALLY existed!!! The things you were saying sounded like they would come from the a$$hole character in a movie! Seriously I understand your concern and need to voice your opinions about Ms. Gomez passing herself off as a professional, but really!?! the way you went about this whole argument was outrageous! My advice to YOU grow up, get a life, and hop off your high horse... You obviously have some serious self - esteem issue, with your false bravado and holier - than - thou attitude. I sincerely hope I don't ever run into you or anyone like you in this industry....It would break my heart. Interior design is something I am relentlessly interested in and I have always shied away from because I feel inferior to some of the work I have seen and am afraid of having my dreams stomped on by people like you. How dare you go about as if you are soooo much better than all the "Dolly Decorators" out there instead of encouraging and imparting wisdom for people who are interested in the same field. Shame, shame, shame on you. Hope your accreditations, paycheck, and repertoire keep you company....I couldn't see someone as scummy as you having anyone in your life....You're pathetic

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

MiMi in Norfolk, Virginia

29 months ago

srg in Mineral Wells, Texas said: Sunshine - woa! I also looked into this forum to get a little insight about interior design and was flat out shocked at your pompous attitude....I didn't realize people like you REALLY existed!!! The things you were saying sounded like they would come from the a$$hole character in a movie! Seriously I understand your concern and need to voice your opinions about Ms. Gomez passing herself off as a professional, but really!?! the way you went about this whole argument was outrageous! My advice to YOU grow up, get a life, and hop off your high horse... You obviously have some serious self - esteem issue, with your false bravado and holier - than - thou attitude. I sincerely hope I don't ever run into you or anyone like you in this industry....It would break my heart. Interior design is something I am relentlessly interested in and I have always shied away from because I feel inferior to some of the work I have seen and am afraid of having my dreams stomped on by people like you. How dare you go about as if you are soooo much better than all the "Dolly Decorators" out there instead of encouraging and imparting wisdom for people who are interested in the same field. Shame, shame, shame on you. Hope your accreditations, paycheck, and repertoire keep you company....I couldn't see someone as scummy as you having anyone in your life....You're pathetic

***WELL SAID*** -- Glad someone finally said it! What a C-word!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Cippy in Oregon in Gresham, Oregon

17 months ago

Wow Sunshine....I don't meam to stoop down to your level but Sunshine-you are not! My My! I share all of the same sentiments as srg & MiMi above! First, how can one compare a physician to a decorator! Pompous is an under statement! Second, I ran in to someone who was a 1/8th as mean as you that was a designer...my work was chosen & published in Women's Day Magazine, a National decor magazine. The first interior designer I told responded with.."Oh, that's not a big deal now if you were in Architectural Digest that would mean something"! And I really consider myself a "humble" person, so I just took it in & through it over my shoulder. When the photo shoot came, the photographers asked "why" I wasn't making a big deal of this what I figured was just 15 minutes of fame! I told the photographer what the designer said to me...his response was.."Did you ask her how many time's she's been or has ever been Nationally published? I was like, "No"! He said well I guarantee you she hasn't & she's obviously jealous! He went on to tell me how pic's get picked & it's quite a process. I feel blessed as other magazines have bought & published my work, 7 national magazines & 2 books, & just a couple weeks ago I was on the cover of Small Rooms. When other designers, see me in magazines, or those who want to be designers or anyone w/ a passion for anything, for that matter! I encourage them to take that chance & put there work out there. I want others to experience what I did! I call myself a designer not a "dolly decorator"! In Oregon, you can call yourself an interior designer w/out a 3 to 4 yr degree! And up to just a few years ago you could become a member of the ASID w/out a degree. I'm just so sad for you! I just looked up your company & you have no web site, no portfolio of wk you've done & you sure spend plenty of time writing on this forum. Maybe you have too much time on your hands, & are just plain bitter.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Cippy in Oregon in Gresham, Oregon

17 months ago

Lastly, this forum is to help others who want to make a career out of Interior Design. There are pro's & con's to both ends of the spectrum of deciding to go to school or not. I think it's a personal decision. I did NOT get a 3-4 yr degree, I did get my CCB license in just wanting to learn things I wanted & needed to learn, I took a few college non accredited classed in decorating, & I am sure to carry liability insurance. Also, it depends what State you live in as far as if you can legally call yourself a "designer", or "decorator"! I'm not sure why everyone get's so caught up in the name! I agree w/ everyone here, either you have it or you don't. It's a lot of work & not often glamorous-like seen on HGTV! However, all the work pay's off when the customer breaks down in tears in sheer joy of the outcome! I was so excited & proud because I offer high school seniors to job "work shadow" me. The last gal' went to Texas & did her degree in 3 yrs, she came back to Oregon & works for a party planning company. Something I can't do w/out a degree...but so proud she can!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

» Sign in or create an account to comment on this topic.