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Will in Houston, Texas

74 months ago

It's tough to tell you what kind of degree we think you have without any details. The primary levels (not fields) I'm familiar with are:
Associates degree, 2 years of study, some people get these and the degree says "Engineering Technology". They're drafters, designers, technically trained, not a lot of theory like calculus, thermo, fluids, etc.
Batchelors (BS), 4 years of study, this is the normal baseline for calling yourself a degreed engineer. There are some very special and rare exceptions.
Masters (MS), 1-2 additional years of study on top of a BS. Specialize in some small field of engineering.
Doctorate (PhD), 3-4 years of study on top of BS. Specialization is some even more minute field of engineering.

MBA is something else completely, a master's degree in business administration. If you're an engineer with an MBA you have a lot of options open to you.

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Imnew

74 months ago

Will in Houston, Texas said: It's tough to tell you what kind of degree we think you have without any details.

What kind of details will be helpful? I'm pleasantly going to give you any information about those details.

Although, it's tough to me to understand where is my degree in American system because of difference in education systems between Europe and America.

I appreciate every help in "solving of this crossword"

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Howard Ambrose no fear in Chester, Maryland

73 months ago

I have just finished my first year out of school, and I need a little bit of guidance. The first job I landed was for Booz Allen Hamilton as a consultant. For almost a year I modeled componants using Pro-E and asked questions, for which I received a shrug and I dunno typically as an answer. I realize now that no-one there was really that interested in design, compared to myself. I am now working for a Temp Agency and they have placed me in a position with people that really CARE about ENGINEERING. I do make mistakes, but I ask questions and people answer me, WOW!! I know I sound paranoid, but I was wondering if it is possible that Booz Allen is somehow behind the scenes here. Like they find people, evaluate them, and then farm them out without their knowledge. Of course I am most likely overanalyzing, and I should just be grateful to have found a company willing to put me through " Engineering Bootcamp "

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will in Cypress, Texas

73 months ago

I doubt they're behind it. Unless you're a genius and it's a front for the NSA. As a young engineer you really need to be around other experienced engineers if you're planning on making a career of it. You may pick up some bad habits working solo.

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A.P. in Virginia Beach, Virginia

69 months ago

robert in Eugene, Oregon said: Im going to a Lane community college and for one of my major assignments i have to talk to someone thats in the career that im most interested in. So if there is a mechanical enganeer out there that does not mind to answer a few questions my email is Baybopalopabob@yahoo.com

Robert, Just for starters, get a more professionial E-Mail address !!!!

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stichini in lake charles, Louisiana

68 months ago

I need some help. I graduated from college on dec 2007 in mche, went back home for a year, where I taught Mathematics at a high school. I am now back in the United States, have my green card, and have extreme difficulty finding a job. I even tried getting anything but was unsuccessful, tried in my degree area and still no success. I have no money to do my masters. Time is going and the only experience I have is working on a project during the summer of 2007.
I would love to get suggestions, any suggestions, because I am lost. Help !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Will in Cypress, Texas

67 months ago

Does MCHE mean Mechanical Engineering? If so, you may have better luck looking for positions requiring "BSME" which is the standard nomenclature for us.
I assume also that you're not only looking in Louisiana, as I've found to have little to offer.
It's a tough time generally, but there are still positions for engineers in Houston as well as some other centers. A masters is a waste if it's in your discipline and you're just trying to buy time. It won't generally help you earn more.

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brochalm in Vancouver wa in Salem, Oregon

67 months ago

As a older student, Im wondering what areas of Mechanical engineering provide the best platform for a new engineer right out of college, I am wondering being 52 when I graduate, I have being a mechanic for Boeing aircraft, Roadway trucking and the US Airforce, also a electrician for airforce and boeing, knowing this what would you guys suggest as the best way to market my self. Im looking for unbiased opinion. I know that Im up against young competitive minds, any suggestions?
Merry Christmas to all
In HIS service

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brochalm in Vancouver wa in Salem, Oregon

67 months ago

I also was wondering how does a graduate become a forensic engineer?

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Milo in Somerville, New Jersey

67 months ago

Well I would say that you should really push the fact that you have a lot of experience. That is really important. Especially since you worked for the Airforce. Dont worry, finding a job at your age is not impossible (especially with your experience and credentials).

How did you work for the Airforce? Were you actually enlisted? Or did you just work for them?

Best of luck and happy holidays

-Milo

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brochalm in Vancouver wa in Salem, Oregon

67 months ago

I was a enlisted non-comissioned officer, Sgt. I started out a Electrician building type, with a speacial unit called RED HORSE, it was a heavey operational readiness repair squadron of men, We traveled the world. Airforce offered me the oppourtunity,(telling me I was really good at electrical), to become a teacher of electrical at the tech school at age 18, I told them I was not ready for that, I wanted to see the world.....Ah being so young..... So after 3 years I cross trained into being a crew chief on fighter aircraft. I been to a lot of schools for the service. Learned many areas from pnematics, hydraulics, sheetmetal,so many areas that overlap.
Anyway any advice I would gladly accept, Its a hugh world out there and I am hoping that I can find a platform I can mesh with comfortably. Living in the Northwest is very appealing to us and we hope to be able to continue living here, but if the opppourtunity comes for a good paying job and a good place to raise our kids we would relocate, Funny we even discussed Europe as an option.

What part of the world are you in? What is the best method for networking?
Thanks

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Milo in Somerville, New Jersey

67 months ago

Im in the northeast or America. I am 18 years old, so I may not be the best to give advice, but. . .

I know some people who moved to Europe or elsewhere to find work, and they are happy. If you find a good fit, go with it. As for networking, the best way I know of is to talk to old classmates or people that you know in the field to see if their company has any openings.

Good luck

-Milo

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Milo in Somerville, New Jersey

67 months ago

Correction: Im in the Northeast OF America.

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zergie vorstok in Spokane, Washington

64 months ago

you don't have to be extremely smart. depends on how you define smart, you do need a descent background on mathematics, science, and in my opinion, you also need to have the ability to understand a phenomenon intuitively, that is UNDERSTAND in real life what is happening.
you need to understand what factors are proportionatly equal and inversely proportional to other factors then understand how a mathematical formula best describes a phenomena, or various mathematical formulas for various factors and variables to describe a given phenomenan. the hardest is to understand are extremely abstract concepts such as certain electrical phenomena like inductive reactance and capacitance and i'm sure there's a million other out there.
an easy example: it's obvious that the stoping distance of a car is proportional to its speed and inversely proportional to the condition of the road or k((constant)) where if the road's slick and icy the constant will be 1 thus the stopping spead will be greater, if the road's dry the constant will be 10 thus reducing the stopping speed.... or if it's gravel maybe 8??? or 12 for beach sand so stoping distance= S/k in reality stoping distance is proportional to the square of velocity. this is a simple example, but in the field of engineering you have to be good with mathematical tools, methods and procedures and be able to apply them in real life. it gets more tricky with time varying constants ((calculus)), and when you go from IDEAL mathematical MODELS to real world models where most if not all constants and variables will have to be derated to best predict the real world. but if you persistently work hard anyone can will do fine in any field of engineering. i'm an electrical engineer and i work for a utility company... even though the pay is good ((90,000 on my 6th year)) it is getting a bit boring, so i wanna work for boeing which is just acrross the state.

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Milo in Somerville, New Jersey

64 months ago

Okay, thanks for your post! That was very informative and detailed. I appreciate it.

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Alex in San Rafael, California

57 months ago

Do you guys know if I would be suitable to be a mechanical engineer:
I took all honors maths in my school including APCalc and APStats. I am doing fine with Stats but having a little difficulty with Calc, but i can retake in college right?. I love building things, knowing how things work, I have had almost straight As- lowest grade is a b+.
I was drawn towards aeronautical but i heard you have to be an absolute genius to be able to that. Also electrical, I heard it was practically pure math and I didn't want that. I also thought of becoming an Actuary, but I don't want an accountant type job.
Any thoughts?

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Milo in New Brunswick, New Jersey

57 months ago

You will be fine if you keep it up. You dont have to be a genius for anything, you just have to work hard. I didnt take the classes you took but I keep up with my work and study hard and Im doing fine in Mechanical Engineering. Mechanical and Aeronautical are pretty much the same. Most colleges have the major Mechanical/Aeronautical Engineering, not just Mechanical Engineering or Aeronautical Engineering. You can do electrical if you want but I know it also has more programming classes. Dont let difficulty hold you back, do what you want.

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Alex in San Rafael, California

57 months ago

What classes did you take in High School? Is there a requirement to be able to at least somewhat comprehend what they teach you in college? I can understand very complex concepts in math if I have the time- I have been always busy with sports and have spent a minimal amount of time on the concepts of ideas rather than the processes.Thanks for your previous input of mech. eng, do you know if actuarial science would be a good major to look into? I appreciate any feedback.

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Milo in New Brunswick, New Jersey

56 months ago

I only made it up to Honors Physics in high school. Thats the highest I got to because I didnt realize that I could and should have challenged myself more. Anyone reading this that is doing well in school and not challenging themselves really should consider it. I thought you had to be a genius to take harder classes, but you dont. You just have to work hard.

Anyway, you should learn the processes and concepts and spend a lot of time with your studies; it pays off. Im not sure about actuarial science. You should talk to a guidance counselor.

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oceansociety in Dracut, Massachusetts

56 months ago

I wish I had these questions before I started studying ME.. I just defended my master's thesis last month and finally looking for jobs, and now I am so so lost!! Specialized in nanotechnology.. needless to say I am out of touch with everything mechanical engineering related. I haven't touched proe/solidworks/fea in at least 2 years.. Never did learn much in machining workshops.. all the TAs always wanted to just machine the parts for me whenever I asked a question (I'm a girl). Best I can say is I know how to use a drill press and a table saw :P
Not sure I ever understood tolerancing. And I really don't remember anything I learned from strength of materials or fluid mechs. The only thing that still sort of stuck with me is vibrations because I loved that class, although I can't say I was the smartest kid in class either. The past 2 years I have done mostly material characterization, and a lot of wet chemistry for making nano-structures and testing them. I ran a lot of weird specialized experiments that I don't think most mech engineers do.
So I have no idea what my expertise is.. other than research in general. I know I like running experiments/tests. I have been so far removed from ME that I don't know how I can convince anyone to hire me as one. But the degree(s) that I have is BSME & MSME.. so I am kinda stuck. Will I be expected to know more because I have a masters? or will companies understand that my 'work/research' experiences are not necessarily very mechanical engineering at all? Can they maybe treat me as an entry level person with just a BSME.. cut my losses on the MSME and move on?
Any body who was maybe in the same boat and successfully got back into ME?

Lost and missing 'actual' ME

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will in Magnolia, Texas

56 months ago

I work in industry with an OEM and I design machines, equipment, etc. I write test procedures, I design parts, I do stackups, lead teams, and do "R&D" (not inventing new materials, but designing new solutions to mechanical problems and equipment out there). In my business, I think having an engineering masters is not very valuable. Further, having a Phd isn't terribly helpful either. You'll be too specialized to use it in most places. Consider to that by my definition of valuable has to do with employ-ability and earning potential.
If you get on with a lab or materials outfit you'll be able to work in their lab. Maybe you'll be able to stay in nano, who knows. Chances are you'll be pigeon-holing yourself.
If you want to be easy to employ shoot for an entry level BSME job and go from there. We've hired physics majors that have a good head on their shoulders. Employers know that you don't learn real CAD or stackups in school (cad is not hart to learn on your own anyway). If you want to get into academia that's a whole other ballgame.

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oceansociety in Dracut, Massachusetts

56 months ago

will in Magnolia, Texas said: I work in industry with an OEM and I design machines, equipment, etc. I write test procedures, I design parts, I do stackups, lead teams, and do "R&D" (not inventing new materials, but designing new solutions to mechanical problems and equipment out there). In my business, I think having an engineering masters is not very valuable. Further, having a Phd isn't terribly helpful either. You'll be too specialized to use it in most places. Consider to that by my definition of valuable has to do with employ-ability and earning potential.
If you get on with a lab or materials outfit you'll be able to work in their lab. Maybe you'll be able to stay in nano, who knows. Chances are you'll be pigeon-holing yourself.
If you want to be easy to employ shoot for an entry level BSME job and go from there. We've hired physics majors that have a good head on their shoulders. Employers know that you don't learn real CAD or stackups in school (cad is not hart to learn on your own anyway). If you want to get into academia that's a whole other ballgame.

Thanks for your comment! Yeah I am starting to think that an entry level BSME job maybe my best choice. None to be found these days though! Everyone says they want at least 3-5 years experience. No, I don't want to stay in nano. that was just the thesis project I was offered that was funded, ready to go, and would pay me a stipend.. (not that I will be saying this to future employer of course!)
Certainly don't want to get into academia. Noooo sir! I just want to be a normal mechanical engineer already!

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will in Magnolia, Texas

56 months ago

Houston's job market is warming up. Just noticed your username. I'm in MTS and design subsea mechanical equipment. Lots of growth potential in that industry here.

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mafu in Pasadena, Maryland

53 months ago

Does automotive engineering fall under the category of ME?

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will in Houston, Texas

53 months ago

Automotive Engineering is a loose group of disciplines. Individually they transfer to many other industries and markets. Mechanical, Manufacturing, Electrical, Computer, Aerospace, Chemical, etc.I think using the term is a mistake for somebody wanting to define what they do...that is unless they REALLY want to identify with that industry. If you're from Detroit maybe that's the ticket.
Under mechanical engineering (ME) for instance, in an automotive environment you could be talking about structural, vibration, thermal, fluids, power train, combustion engines, materials, and process engineering, etc. Almost all of that transfers to in one way or another to the Oilfield or Aviation industry among others.

[On a side note, unless it's already understood, I use the MechE to differentiate from Manufacturing Engineering.]

My personal policy (written about in earlier posts) is to be a generalists. MechE's are jack of all trades, masters of none.

To be a successful/modern knowledge worker you have to be flexible and know more about how to solve many different problems than how to solve very specific problems (specialist). The first lends itself to the second, but not the other way around.

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will in Houston, Texas

53 months ago

Automotive Engineering is a loose group of disciplines. Individually they transfer to many other industries and markets. Mechanical, Manufacturing, Electrical, Computer, Aerospace, Chemical, etc.I think using the term is a mistake for somebody wanting to define what they do...that is unless they REALLY want to identify with that industry. If you're from Detroit maybe that's the ticket.
Under mechanical engineering (ME) for instance, in an automotive environment you could be talking about structural, vibration, thermal, fluids, power train, combustion engines, materials, and process engineering, etc. Almost all of that transfers to in one way or another to the Oilfield or Aviation industry among others.

[On a side note, unless it's already understood, I use the MechE to differentiate from Manufacturing Engineering.]

My personal policy (written about in earlier posts) is to be a generalists. MechE's are jack of all trades, masters of none.

To be a successful/modern knowledge worker you have to be flexible and know more about how to solve many different problems than how to solve very specific problems (specialist). The first lends itself to the second, but not the other way around.

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eric planting in denver, Colorado

53 months ago

AUE is a lot of professions, none are really aggressively hiring right now, but you can always join the military, they're hiring

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john in Arlington, Texas

52 months ago

Did anybody notice that how firm pays engineers $4000 to $6000 / month and they make millions of dollars from there ideas. I have a PhD in Mech engineering and where I work I only give 40% of my creative capacity because they only pay me $6000 /month and make millions is profit from ideas generated by engineering department. I say to hell with them.

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tired in Winston Salem, North Carolina

51 months ago

@john in Arlington,
Welcome to the real world. Almost every engineering company is controlled by business people, not technical people. Business people only like money, and technical people are only tolerated to the extent they can be exploited. Since business people control the money, you (like the rest of us) can forget about it...

Here are some ideas to get out of that trap:
1] While working, pretend to be happy so you can keep income while you put the rest of your plan in action. That includes performing at 100% even if you don't feel that they've earned it. The reasons are: you don't want to earn a bad or mediocre reputation, and you don't want to become lazy or too cynical or left behind the technology curve.
2] Pay off as much debt as quickly as you can, and save enough money to cover your basic expenses for at least a year. (You'll need this when you jump, later.) You'll find that being debt free is very empowering.
3] Find a niche that interests you and appears to be marketable. Become very good or expert in it.
4] Study your industry to understand how it works. Also, network with others (with an eye upon leveraging them to help you make a jump, later). Learn exactly what your company's strengths and weaknesses are.
5] Put together a plan to jump from your current employer to your own business. Exercise your network to get you started, possibly first as a consultant.
6] Leave your current employer and take charge of your own destiny. Try to make it an amiable split because your old employer may become a client. If you did your homework well you should be able to compete (and beat) your old employer.

It will take some time, but you will never get ahead while most of your ideas earn more money for leaches than for you.

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John A in Old Westbury, New York

51 months ago

These are the most helpfull review ive read online and i found that they answered alot of my questions.Id like to thank everyone that responded with their helpful advice, Im currently in school with the intentions to graduate with a Mechanical Engineering degree and going to be a junior next school year, i have not started my core classes but will start next year with engineering mechanical statics and intro to material science. im finishing up calc 2(B) and physics 1(B-) but i find physics hard (professor lacks proper communication skills)and was wondering how heavly is physics and calculus apply to actual field work.

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this guy in Cypress, Texas

51 months ago

For me, physics....absolutely. Calculus, not as much.

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John A in Old Westbury, New York

51 months ago

Wouldnt what i learn in my core classes be more useful that everything i learned in my physics classed combined

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this guy in Cypress, Texas

51 months ago

Statics and Dynamics are really focused parts of the greater 1st semester physics class. So in a way they're partially covered. But if you're not getting it in Physics, you may have trouble later on. You won't graduate without the 2-3 semesters of Calculus (I had I, II, II) plus a 4th term (linear algebra) of some other math so just buckle down and get to it.

With the good foundation, the later stuff with come easy. It doesn't work the other way around. Mechanics of Materials or Basic Machine Design are primarily based in statics and other simple physics...plus another higher layer concerning practical mechanisms and material stresses. Get my point?

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John A in Old Westbury, New York

51 months ago

Thank You for your fast response, i have basic understanding of the concept of physics and newtons laws and how it is applies on a body, but the in-depth focus not the basics is what i wanted to know do i really have to focus on it? i have to take calculus I,II,III and differential equation im currently doing ok in calc II with a current B, and i have heard that is the hardest of them all and that from there on the rest of the Math courses isn't as hard as Calc II, so i should be just fine?. Also You mentioned the work(courses) as steadily decreasing in hardness ? Is that really the case.

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litechocolate in Silver Spring, Maryland

45 months ago

john in Arlington, Texas said: Did anybody notice that how firm pays engineers $4000 to $6000 / month and they make millions of dollars from there ideas. I have a PhD in Mech engineering and where I work I only give 40% of my creative capacity because they only pay me $6000 /month and make millions is profit from ideas generated by engineering department. I say to hell with them.

If you cant beat em then join them. Start your own firm and compete!

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Mike in Easton, Pennsylvania

45 months ago

"I am a mechanical engineer and I design buildings all the time. You see mechanical engineering is one of the most diverse engineering fields, you could be doing anything from engine parts and technical design (my first job I worked for Harley Davidson) to air conditioning etc. For the past 15 years I have done vibration tests on huge structures, like wind and vibration tests on tall buildings (for example the Chicago Spire in Chicago), stadiums, and bridges. I never knew buildings had things like dampers, etc."

--Hey Bob, I am also a mechanical engineer myself. If you don't mind, I am interested how you got to work in structural engineering on buildings/bridges from a mechanical engineering point? Usually, that field would be on the civil engineering side, no?
Thanks for your time!

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NapaGuy in Napa, California

45 months ago

I have been reading your forum and thought someone might be able to help . . . My son graduated from UC Davis, CA March of 09 and has been unable to land a position. It appears that there are just too many experienced ME out here looking for work.

So, I was wondering if anyone here would know of any entry level positions that he could apply for, where they would consider him.

Thank you for any assistance ....

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Chris in Heidelberg, Australia

44 months ago

Ok so I've skimmed throughout this and I'm interested in ME, but the one final question, which is a huge part of my decision, do they actually build? Because I enjoy designing trinkets like I have done at school, but the motivation was that I would build it soon. Or is there a different job for that? Please help.

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deepak chainani in Toronto, Ontario

44 months ago

I am in high school in my sophomore, my junior sucked in math. I'm trying my best to do well in physics chemistry calculus and trigo this sophomore and senior year,and I'm interested in mechanical engineering focusing on automotive.
How tough is it to be accepted in college for this field? What do you guys suggest I should do to have a better chance in being accepted at college? Where in the world is a reasonable place to study this field?

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Imnew

44 months ago

deepak chainani in Toronto, Ontario said: Where in the world is a reasonable place to study this field?

Theory in Russia, Ukraine in Top State University; experience in America.

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Imnew

44 months ago

NapaGuy in Napa, California said: It appears that there are just too many experienced ME out here looking for work.

So, I was wondering if anyone here would know of any entry level positions that he could apply for, where they would consider him.


If too many ME are looking for work and no place for entry level, I will put on a floor workers uniform and will start from that. Money are never easy and the life too. So, if your son want to work out his degree, he has to go and Work and do not look for easy beginning and easy life, they do not exist anymore. This is what I think.

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Imnew

44 months ago

tired in Winston Salem, North Carolina said: @john in Arlington,
Welcome to the real world. Almost every engineering company is controlled by business people, not technical people. Business people only like money, and technical people are only tolerated to the extent they can be exploited. Since business people control the money, you (like the rest of us) can forget about it...

Here are some ideas to get out of that trap:
1] While working, pretend to be happy so you can keep income while you put the rest of your plan in action. That includes performing at 100% even if you don't feel that they've earned it. The reasons are: you don't want to earn a bad or mediocre reputation, and you don't want to become lazy or too cynical or left behind the technology curve.
2] Pay off as much debt as quickly as you can, and save enough money to cover your basic expenses for at least a year. (You'll need this when you jump, later.) You'll find that being debt free is very empowering.
3] Find a niche that interests you and appears to be marketable. Become very good or expert in it.
4] Study your industry to understand how it works. Also, network with others (with an eye upon leveraging them to help you make a jump, later). Learn exactly what your company's strengths and weaknesses are.
5] Put together a plan to jump from your current employer to your own business. Exercise your network to get you started, possibly first as a consultant.
6] Leave your current employer and take charge of your own destiny. Try to make it an amiable split because your old employer may become a client. If you did your homework well you should be able to compete (and beat) your old employer.

It will take some time, but you will never get ahead while most of your ideas earn more money for leaches than for you.

Agree. If John always were making his "homeworks/projects" very well he can be rehired by his old employer as a contractor with increased pay.

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Imnew

44 months ago

will in Houston, Texas said: My personal policy (written about in earlier posts) is to be a generalists. MechE's are jack of all trades, masters of none.

To be a successful/modern knowledge worker you have to be flexible and know more about how to solve many different problems than how to solve very specific problems (specialist). The first lends itself to the second, but not the other way around.


to be a generalists is not a bad idea, but to know everythind or most of everything human just can't, or if to try to know alot of thins than you will know kind of everything, but really nothing. I agree that to know Automoto field is better compare to knowlage just, for ex., in metallurgy.

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Leon in Edinburgh, United Kingdom

44 months ago

Me I am a first year student in mecheng and I don't know what kind of engineer
I will become. I love theoretical aspect but don't understand anything about practical
Work . It's like that since i am kid , I love maths and applied mechanics so much so that I work
On my own taking a year of advance . My theoretical skills are very good as my teachers say .
But in balance ........ my practical and technical skills. Are terrible. You guy have no ideas !!!
The worst is that I don't do that on purpose I had a chat with my lecturers who are all chartered engineers some dont believe me stating that if I can do maths I'm supposed to know how to do everything some others don't care and the rest tell me to transfer to a faculty of mathematics
But the thing is that I love mechanical engineering so much !! I really wish my brain worked the
Other way round !!

Any advice please !!!!!!!!!!!

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john Cal in San Francisco, California

44 months ago

for ME major, the design skills is more important than innovation skills. you need to be familiar with tradition ME knowledge, good math and recent designing software.
here are some opportunities for ME:
job.comesocial.com/engineer-jobs/electrical-engineer-jobs.html

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Imnew

43 months ago

Leon in Edinburgh, there where you aren't good try to learn from another teacher/instructor; if not, try another one; ...; if not, try harder, drill and drill what you can't; if not, ask everybody "stupid questions" who is better then you in it. You have to find your own way how to do that what you can't and it can be even totally new way.

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Imnew

43 months ago

john Cal in San Francisco, California said: good math and recent designing software.

I'll say, very good math and combination math+software. I mean every designed line should be calculated but not just measured from some draft. This is first thing that have to have ME, if not floor workers will talk not nice about you and will finish their job not like you wanted. Also very need to have big attension to details instead just copypasting, .... .

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SHCsarg in San Antonio, Texas

40 months ago

Hi am a junior in high school and I am pretty sure that I want to become a mechanical engineer, Mabey get my masters. I would like to possibly go into the automotive industry (I would rather enjoy working for BMW M or merc AMG) But also mabey weapons manufacturing? After reading this thread I am kinda intrigued by the whole millitary engineer thing, AC130 anyone? I know my aspirations seem childish but I am serious about becoming an engineer. I would really apretiate some insight in that whole automotive route. I have decent grades and my teachers consider me smart.

PS: I'm also kinda big into cars. ( Dream car = 2012 BMW M5 )

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Will in Houston, Texas

40 months ago

That's great that you have some direction in where you want to go. At about the same point I knew I was going to do engineering but wasn't sure which discipline. I don't think my view point is too unique but I'll tell you anyway. There are only a few types engineering at the core. Mechanical, Electrical/CompSci, Civil. I have a BSMechE and think it was a good choice. There are many more focused programs but I think that while they focus more on certain topics, they also limit your employability. Aerospace is a good example. I'm going to make a wild guess and say, after Aeronautical Engineering degrees, Boeing and Lockheed employ more Mech's than any other engineering degree (if the MechE's don't outnumber the AERO's altogether).

Every electrical device sits in a housing, and is kept cool, and interfaces with/by/for mechanical structures designed by MechEs.

You could get an Automotive Engieering Degree, but I'd venture a guess that the same thing is true of Ford as is Boeing.

Stay flexible, study hard, and do something you love. If you're into cars and can't get enough of them on the weekend...go into that industry. If you can't find your dream job right away, get something that pays the bills and do something you love in your garage. Work towards that dream job along the way and you'll end up there.

SHCsarg in San Antonio, Texas said: Hi am a junior in high school and I am pretty sure that I want to become a mechanical engineer, Mabey get my masters. ..... I would really apretiate some insight in that whole automotive route. I have decent grades and my teachers consider me smart.

PS: I'm also kinda big into cars. ( Dream car = 2012 BMW M5 )

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Will in Houston, Texas

40 months ago

An addition:
I'll offer this practical piece of advice which includes some elementary economics as well. If you work in an industry which produces commodities (fridges, ovens, phones, backhoes, automobiles), you and all your company work within tight profit margins. This translates to smaller compensation packages compared your peers doing custom, special project, spec work in niche industries. There's a supposed tradeoff there too regarding stability (niche is less stable?). But look at Detroit now and tell me that theory holds water.

I've been in both and can tell you the only security is work hard and place yourself where you want to be and where you want to go. America is producing and engineering fewer commodities. This is a simple fact of global commerce/economics that our government and Wall Street supports. It won't stop. Our strengths and future center on innovative, high tech, highly complex products. Cars will continue to be safer since imports face transportation costs domestic production. You're in San Antonio so I know you know there's a very large/new Tundra plant there. That's the future. But most of the innovative/hard engineering work is being done in Japan. Styling and other 'soft' design work is done in California I beleive. There's plenty of manufacturing support/engineering work at places like that. Alabama has a BMW plant as well as some other foriegn brands.

I'll stop ranting. But this is info you ought to be conscientious of. I guess my moral of the story is don't get pigeon holed. I've met lots of folks who felt stuck but were afraid to get out of what they knew. Avoid this state of mind.

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