Not sure about engineering

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Milo in Somerville, New Jersey

85 months ago

Wow. Thanks a lot for your response, you totally answered my question perfectly. I feel better now that I see other people are in pretty much the same boat I am; and I know we can make it. I like to think (hopefully correctly) that whatever you want to do (either a carrer or whatever) as long as you work hard for it and want it you can do it, and of course having previous knowledge always helps. Thanks a lot.

Hey everyone post on these boards (its easy), lets make it the greatest it can be. I just got helped tremendously, maybe we can help someone else.

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Will A. in Houston, Texas

85 months ago

Don't mention it. I graduated in 02 and think its a great profession to be in. And, we need more good engineers.

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Milo in Somerville, New Jersey

85 months ago

Nice, I cant wait until I graduate. You saying 'we need more good engineers' reminds me I have another question: If you did get a job in engineering, did you get it quickly or did it take a while? Because I hear it could either take a while to get a job or you could get it right away. Any comments on that? Thanks again.

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john Elliott in Fairfax, Virginia

85 months ago

Some hiring processes take only a few weeks, others may take several months. Its a perfectly legitimate question to ask an employer what their hiring timeline looks like.

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Will A. in Houston, Texas

85 months ago

For someone out of school, it takes a bit longer because by definition you are an unproven engineering resource. Not just technically, but corporate environments are tough for some people to get accustomed to. I had a 3.2 GPA and at least 2-3 dozen rejections before my first offer. If I remember correctly, I accepted it. The trick was starting before I graduated so my first day of work was the day after my last exam. The 4.0 guys get jobs quicker, if you're below a 3 you'll have a challenge if you don't have a good network.

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Milo in Somerville, New Jersey

85 months ago

I'm so grateful for all of your continued advice, if you guys or anyone else has anything else to add please post. If I have any other questions I will be sure to ask255 because you guys are very wise. Happy holidays.

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Milo in Somerville, New Jersey

85 months ago

Sorry about the ask255, my computer is awkward. Its just suppose to be "ask"

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Milo in Manville, New Jersey

84 months ago

I have a few more questions. As a (mechanical) engineer, what do you typically do during your workday? Also, as an engineer, do you work on any of the actual building, or just mostly oversee and design the construction? Finally why do engineers change jobs so often? Is it because they just do one job with a company then move on, or because they werent needed (or something)? Thanks in advance and happy new year!

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will in Houston, Texas

84 months ago

typically do?....well I don't design any buildings. The phrase mechanical engineer does apply to people who design/oversee commercial HVAC, plumbing, and utility construction. But they're usually working for an architect, who also hires a structural engineer (who can also be a B.S.Mechanical Eng (BSME)) who deals with stuff like floor weight, wind loads, column strength of buildings

I design equipment, machines, and devices. So a conveyor system, bulldozer, giant bread baking machine, a blender, a pressure vessel, a crane, etc. I run calculations on strength of materials, design power trains, select off-the-shelf components, consider corrosion, ergonomics, manufacturability, service-ability to name a few. Once we know what we want, we make drawings, procedures which are basically instructions to the production people. Guys like me sometimes use the title Design Engineer to differentiate from the more generic Mechanical Engineer.

The terms a somewhat loose. So you find Mechanical Engineers, Design Engineers, Mechanical Design Engineers, Product Design Engineers all doing similar stuff. The name depends on the industry and even your company.

Why do folks change jobs often? Well the simple answer is that they can. The market is good enough that if you're tired of working at one place, you can usually find another that suits your needs. It's a way to gain experience, make more money faster, and keep you interested.

Someone who stays somewhere for a long time make have another view on this. For instance, they put a higher premium on stability, loyalty, and having an specific organizational expertise that only comes with time served.

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Milo in Somerville, New Jersey

84 months ago

Okay, thanks again for the great information. I'll see if I have any more questions; you've been extremely helpful so far.

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Cammie A in Longview, Texas

84 months ago

How much can u expect to make coming right out of college with a BS in ME?

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will in Houston, Texas

84 months ago

Well, it depends on a lot of things. Yourself, your grades, what industry you want to get into, what job you want to do with with your BSME, how well you present yourself. For the 80th percentile most people, I'd say its 40-55k. It can climb quickly from there or plateau.

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bob in Lodi, New Jersey

84 months ago

I went to school for hvac and now im trying to get a job as testing semiconductors any advice

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robert in Eugene, Oregon

83 months ago

Im going to a Lane community college and for one of my major assignments i have to talk to someone thats in the career that im most interested in. So if there is a mechanical enganeer out there that does not mind to answer a few questions my email is Baybopalopabob@yahoo.com

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fatiha in Plano, Texas

83 months ago

Hi Will,
do you have any job opening for a mechanical engineer in the company where you are curently working.
I appreciate your response.

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Will A. in Houston, Texas

83 months ago

In my group, I've heard we have 9 spots for EEs and MEs combined. My group is one of many who are hiring. Go to http://208.46.106.181/ to see the postings.

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Milo in Bridgewater, New Jersey

79 months ago

Hey again, I have more questions. I'm a little worried about handling my own projects in college. If any of you remember back to your college days, what kind of projects did you have to complete by yourself and/or with a group? Were the projects simple? Were the tasks to come up with a new design for something or to build an existing one? Or can you do your own thing? Did you have plenty of time to finish them? Did your college education up until then prepare you to take on the projects? Thanks.

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Will in Houston, Texas

79 months ago

I did several projects in school. If I limit to engineering curricula, I wrote some software with a team for a robot project while others did nuts and bolts stuff, and worked circuits out. I did a couple research projects in groups. School projects are about as good as you _can_ get before you graduate. But there's more to learn when you get out.

For instance, in school you'll be working in an egalitarian group...everyone is a peer and basically no one person is ultimately responsible. In the real world you'll be working in a team...usually first with a senior engineer directing things and making bigger decisions, drafters or designers who listen to what you want, and outsiders like purchasing, marketing, manufacturing who have their own proceedures which may want to have a say in things too.

One of the best skills that I never learned in school (or at least I wasn't taught) was to approach people in my company (or w/ a vender) and pulling them into my project. For instance, chances are you don't know the difference between a fillet and a bevel weld, or if that Bridgeport mill can hold a ±.001 tolerance on a 40" long part. The best people to answer those questions is to go or call to the shop and ask the guy who works the machine or lays down the weld. I think, to be successful you have to be comfortable enough with yourself to say "I don't know this, I need to get help" ... and then go out and get it.

You may graduate and think your hot sh*t...and you can get everything you need out of your books or wikipedia. Well, you can't. You'll need to consult people all the time.

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bob in Chicago, Illinois

77 months ago

I am a mechanical engineer and I design buildings all the time. You see mechanical engineering is one of the most diverse engineering fields, you could be doing anything from engine parts and technical design (my first job I worked for Harley Davidson) to air conditioning etc. For the past 15 years I have done vibration tests on huge structures, like wind and vibration tests on tall buildings (for example the Chicago Spire in Chicago), stadiums, and bridges. I never knew buildings had things like dampers, etc. You never know what field you may go into or what you'll need next (I certainly thought I would never need anything from my vibration classes! Boy was I wrong!). I believe anyone can do engineering, especially if you work ten times harder than everyone else. However, realize that some do have to work harder than others. Being naturally among the best and working harder is even better. Remember- in school everyone is in the same boat. Grades aren't everything, but the ability to be able to accurately and quickly solve problems is paramount. Professors give too much material in too little time, but all that matters is how well you do relative to the rest of your peers. Your love of math and science will be tested every day, both in school and on the job. Make sure you like and practice so you are proficient at what you do, because the rest of your life is a long time! If you love math and science, nothing is more challenging, fun, and rewarding. Engineering is fun in a challenging puzzle kind of way. It is an honest profession where hard work pays off big-time, for something I consider fun, but the more areas of expertise you have the more valuable you are to the company. Also, college, especially grad school- is like navy seal training- your abilities are tested to the maximum, and you are over prepared. However, being able to apply it effectively is a true gift that will make your life much easier and not tested enough for in college. In college the problems a

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Engineer08 in Glen Allen, Virginia

77 months ago

You do not have to be "genius" to become an engineer but you need to have the dedication and strong hard work ethics if you want become engineer. If your grades lack luster (I'm assuming your in HS) then you should probably attend community college first and then transfer over to 4 year University/College for your BS. It has several advantages, see below

1. Save $$$ in terms of tuition/books
2. Get better aspect of college environment/life
3. Limited consequences, meaning that if you decide to change your major during/before/after semester it's not big deal
4. Lastly, this touch bases with previous one (#3) but it give you an idea what's the engineering all about when you take couple courses.

If you decided to attend 4 year University/College then make sure the school is ABET Accredited, it matters especially if you want to land Federal job. And also be sure to take full advantage of internship (typically occurs in Junior or Senior year), it's your pathway of landing the job right after you graduate (typically)

Even if the internship does not work out for you then simply post your resume online such as monster/dice/careerbuilder but don't wait for recruiter to contact you, you have to put in the effort of contacting recruiter for the job.

If that does not work then study the trend, meaning that what sector of engineering will be in demand. Example, Field Engineer for oil companies (Exxon, Chevron,Halliburton, Baker Atlas) will always be in demand!

This is my 2 cent but hang in there when it's get tough. Good Luck :)

Milo in Somerville, New Jersey said: I've always wanted to be an engineer, but Im not sure Im smart enough. Did any of you guys think like this?

Will college prepare me, or should I already know most of the stuff ahead of time?

What do employers expect from you in your job?

Not to sound immature, but do you have to be like a genius to make it as an enigneer?

-Thanks in advance

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John in Charleston, South Carolina

75 months ago

I'm 41 and I've decided to go to college to become a mechanical engineer. College has always been a personal goal, and engineering has always been an interest. I went to Nuclear Power School for the US Navy in '86-'87 and completed my six years, but somehow ended up in the hospitality industry when I finished. I have been bored and unfulfilled ever since. I will be attending a technical college near Clemson University that has an engineering transfer program for my freshman year and then transfer to Clemson for the remainder of my degree.

I'm slightly concerned about being 45-46 when I graduate! Should I be worried? I know other ME's and they have all told me to go for it! One even told me to stay in touch and he will help me find a job.

It appears ME is more diversified in relation to other Engineering Fields. Is that true?

I know school is going to be difficult but my approach is that this will be my JOB for the next 4 years. I am highly competitive and team oriented and feel that this is a great fit for my pesonality.

Any advice will be greatly appreciated.

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Will in Houston, Texas

75 months ago

Go for it. You can start as an ME in 4 years and enjoy your next 15-20 years or keep on in the biz you're in an be bored. I work with a couple 70 year olds.
I also work with some folks who started late, and they tend to be better engineers, in my experience. Or at least, they bring a lot of perspective that you can't get otherwise. I also work with a nuke school alumni who does a lot of EE design for us.
ME is the most diversified. With this degree you can work in aerospace, construction, mining, oil&gas, product design, electronics, transportation and automotive, computers, and consumer products....among others. All other nuts and bolts "engineering" degrees are derivative! The only one that comes close is Electrical Engineering, but that's not "nuts and bolts" like I say.
You could specialize in one field/branch, but then you limit your employment possibilities.

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John in Charleston, South Carolina

75 months ago

Will in Houston, Texas said: Go for it. You can start as an ME in 4 years and enjoy your next 15-20 years or keep on in the biz you're in an be bored. I work with a couple 70 year olds.
I also work with some folks who started late, and they tend to be better engineers, in my experience. Or at least, they bring a lot of perspective that you can't get otherwise. I also work with a nuke school alumni who does a lot of EE design for us.
ME is the most diversified. With this degree you can work in aerospace, construction, mining, oil&gas, product design, electronics, transportation and automotive, computers, and consumer products....among others. All other nuts and bolts "engineering" degrees are derivative! The only one that comes close is Electrical Engineering, but that's not "nuts and bolts" like I say.
You could specialize in one field/branch, but then you limit your employment possibilities.

Will, I appreciate your quick response. I'm excited about the opportunities that lie ahead.

I have broken my life up into 30 year segments; birth to 30- experience life to it's fullest, which I did; 30 to 60- get married, start a family and hopefully find a career that is rewarding, two of three accoplished; 60 to 90- look back and say wow you lived one heck of a life. Anything over 90, lucky!

PS Are you currently in Houston? It looks devasted according to pictures I've seen. I hope you and your family are doing well.

John

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Dylan in New Berlin, Wisconsin

75 months ago

if you dont have very good grades can you still get into college

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Engineer08

75 months ago

Dylan in New Berlin, Wisconsin said: if you dont have very good grades can you still get into college

If your grades aren't in top shape it doesn't mean that you can't attend universities/college but you probably have to take a detour. In other words, if you submitted to several universities/colleges and they declined your application then your best option is to attend your local community college. But make sure that community college is reputable and has accreditation. Furthermore, double check to see if the class credits will transfer over to 4 year university

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Gwen Cooper in Fort Collins, Colorado

71 months ago

Bob,
I'm looking for a Cx engineer for a solid, highly reputable national MEP firm. They do large scale projects in healthcare, biotech, clean rooms, labs and industry. The person taking the position would move into the department lead position in about five years after current head of dept. retires.
Very innovative and creative group.
Thanks in advance.
Gwen Cooper
cooperco@verinet.com

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jimbob in Buffalo, Minnesota

68 months ago

what colleges would i go to for a mechanical engineer.

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Imnew in Wisconsin

68 months ago

Are some Engineers here from Wisconsin? Or how may I find good Engineering companies in this state?

A few general questions. How will you like your work if in your working team will work person with European accent, not perfect English, may be different way of thinking or behavior? Will it bother you? How, likly, will be your attitude to this person: will you be patient or you will have a running fire inside of you, etc...?

Thanks everyone for your answer.

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will in Houston, Texas

68 months ago

Ha! Maybe you'd have trouble if you were in a very small town or some other way out of the way location. Americans are used to seeing foreigners in the workplace. Some are vendors, some are immigrants, some are in-house consultants (from India for instance).

If your English is terrible, you may have trouble. If you're working with a jerk, you may have trouble. But I think most engineers look to technical skill first, and whether or not you're making a fair attempt to be a team player and you're trying to fit into the organization. I've worked with French, Japanese, Albanians, Germans, Mexicans, Spanish, and Vietnamese to name a few. In Wisconson, I doubt you'll be the only one with a funny accent.

I'm familiar with two engineering/manufacturing outfits there. 2G www.2g-eng.com/ and JW Speaker www.jwspeaker.com/ . Harley Davidson and a few other bigger manufactures are around there too.

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Imnew in Wisconsin

67 months ago

I did evaluation of my diploma in US and it says by US equivalency I've got Master Degree in Mech. Engineering. Level of study University.
As I found the Degree in US can be such as MS, ME, MSE or MBA.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master's_degree

So, who of you, the real American Mechanical Engineers, could explain me, what the kind (sort, tipe, ...) Degree I have? This questing is more about how should I explain my Degree to some Employer.

Thanks everyone for your time in answering on it.

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Will in Houston, Texas

67 months ago

It's tough to tell you what kind of degree we think you have without any details. The primary levels (not fields) I'm familiar with are:
Associates degree, 2 years of study, some people get these and the degree says "Engineering Technology". They're drafters, designers, technically trained, not a lot of theory like calculus, thermo, fluids, etc.
Batchelors (BS), 4 years of study, this is the normal baseline for calling yourself a degreed engineer. There are some very special and rare exceptions.
Masters (MS), 1-2 additional years of study on top of a BS. Specialize in some small field of engineering.
Doctorate (PhD), 3-4 years of study on top of BS. Specialization is some even more minute field of engineering.

MBA is something else completely, a master's degree in business administration. If you're an engineer with an MBA you have a lot of options open to you.

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Imnew

67 months ago

Will in Houston, Texas said: It's tough to tell you what kind of degree we think you have without any details.

What kind of details will be helpful? I'm pleasantly going to give you any information about those details.

Although, it's tough to me to understand where is my degree in American system because of difference in education systems between Europe and America.

I appreciate every help in "solving of this crossword"

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Howard Ambrose no fear in Chester, Maryland

67 months ago

I have just finished my first year out of school, and I need a little bit of guidance. The first job I landed was for Booz Allen Hamilton as a consultant. For almost a year I modeled componants using Pro-E and asked questions, for which I received a shrug and I dunno typically as an answer. I realize now that no-one there was really that interested in design, compared to myself. I am now working for a Temp Agency and they have placed me in a position with people that really CARE about ENGINEERING. I do make mistakes, but I ask questions and people answer me, WOW!! I know I sound paranoid, but I was wondering if it is possible that Booz Allen is somehow behind the scenes here. Like they find people, evaluate them, and then farm them out without their knowledge. Of course I am most likely overanalyzing, and I should just be grateful to have found a company willing to put me through " Engineering Bootcamp "

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will in Cypress, Texas

67 months ago

I doubt they're behind it. Unless you're a genius and it's a front for the NSA. As a young engineer you really need to be around other experienced engineers if you're planning on making a career of it. You may pick up some bad habits working solo.

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A.P. in Virginia Beach, Virginia

62 months ago

robert in Eugene, Oregon said: Im going to a Lane community college and for one of my major assignments i have to talk to someone thats in the career that im most interested in. So if there is a mechanical enganeer out there that does not mind to answer a few questions my email is Baybopalopabob@yahoo.com

Robert, Just for starters, get a more professionial E-Mail address !!!!

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stichini in lake charles, Louisiana

61 months ago

I need some help. I graduated from college on dec 2007 in mche, went back home for a year, where I taught Mathematics at a high school. I am now back in the United States, have my green card, and have extreme difficulty finding a job. I even tried getting anything but was unsuccessful, tried in my degree area and still no success. I have no money to do my masters. Time is going and the only experience I have is working on a project during the summer of 2007.
I would love to get suggestions, any suggestions, because I am lost. Help !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Will in Cypress, Texas

61 months ago

Does MCHE mean Mechanical Engineering? If so, you may have better luck looking for positions requiring "BSME" which is the standard nomenclature for us.
I assume also that you're not only looking in Louisiana, as I've found to have little to offer.
It's a tough time generally, but there are still positions for engineers in Houston as well as some other centers. A masters is a waste if it's in your discipline and you're just trying to buy time. It won't generally help you earn more.

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brochalm in Vancouver wa in Salem, Oregon

61 months ago

As a older student, Im wondering what areas of Mechanical engineering provide the best platform for a new engineer right out of college, I am wondering being 52 when I graduate, I have being a mechanic for Boeing aircraft, Roadway trucking and the US Airforce, also a electrician for airforce and boeing, knowing this what would you guys suggest as the best way to market my self. Im looking for unbiased opinion. I know that Im up against young competitive minds, any suggestions?
Merry Christmas to all
In HIS service

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brochalm in Vancouver wa in Salem, Oregon

61 months ago

I also was wondering how does a graduate become a forensic engineer?

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Milo in Somerville, New Jersey

61 months ago

Well I would say that you should really push the fact that you have a lot of experience. That is really important. Especially since you worked for the Airforce. Dont worry, finding a job at your age is not impossible (especially with your experience and credentials).

How did you work for the Airforce? Were you actually enlisted? Or did you just work for them?

Best of luck and happy holidays

-Milo

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brochalm in Vancouver wa in Salem, Oregon

61 months ago

I was a enlisted non-comissioned officer, Sgt. I started out a Electrician building type, with a speacial unit called RED HORSE, it was a heavey operational readiness repair squadron of men, We traveled the world. Airforce offered me the oppourtunity,(telling me I was really good at electrical), to become a teacher of electrical at the tech school at age 18, I told them I was not ready for that, I wanted to see the world.....Ah being so young..... So after 3 years I cross trained into being a crew chief on fighter aircraft. I been to a lot of schools for the service. Learned many areas from pnematics, hydraulics, sheetmetal,so many areas that overlap.
Anyway any advice I would gladly accept, Its a hugh world out there and I am hoping that I can find a platform I can mesh with comfortably. Living in the Northwest is very appealing to us and we hope to be able to continue living here, but if the opppourtunity comes for a good paying job and a good place to raise our kids we would relocate, Funny we even discussed Europe as an option.

What part of the world are you in? What is the best method for networking?
Thanks

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Milo in Somerville, New Jersey

61 months ago

Im in the northeast or America. I am 18 years old, so I may not be the best to give advice, but. . .

I know some people who moved to Europe or elsewhere to find work, and they are happy. If you find a good fit, go with it. As for networking, the best way I know of is to talk to old classmates or people that you know in the field to see if their company has any openings.

Good luck

-Milo

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Milo in Somerville, New Jersey

61 months ago

Correction: Im in the Northeast OF America.

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zergie vorstok in Spokane, Washington

57 months ago

you don't have to be extremely smart. depends on how you define smart, you do need a descent background on mathematics, science, and in my opinion, you also need to have the ability to understand a phenomenon intuitively, that is UNDERSTAND in real life what is happening.
you need to understand what factors are proportionatly equal and inversely proportional to other factors then understand how a mathematical formula best describes a phenomena, or various mathematical formulas for various factors and variables to describe a given phenomenan. the hardest is to understand are extremely abstract concepts such as certain electrical phenomena like inductive reactance and capacitance and i'm sure there's a million other out there.
an easy example: it's obvious that the stoping distance of a car is proportional to its speed and inversely proportional to the condition of the road or k((constant)) where if the road's slick and icy the constant will be 1 thus the stopping spead will be greater, if the road's dry the constant will be 10 thus reducing the stopping speed.... or if it's gravel maybe 8??? or 12 for beach sand so stoping distance= S/k in reality stoping distance is proportional to the square of velocity. this is a simple example, but in the field of engineering you have to be good with mathematical tools, methods and procedures and be able to apply them in real life. it gets more tricky with time varying constants ((calculus)), and when you go from IDEAL mathematical MODELS to real world models where most if not all constants and variables will have to be derated to best predict the real world. but if you persistently work hard anyone can will do fine in any field of engineering. i'm an electrical engineer and i work for a utility company... even though the pay is good ((90,000 on my 6th year)) it is getting a bit boring, so i wanna work for boeing which is just acrross the state.

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Milo in Somerville, New Jersey

57 months ago

Okay, thanks for your post! That was very informative and detailed. I appreciate it.

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Alex in San Rafael, California

50 months ago

Do you guys know if I would be suitable to be a mechanical engineer:
I took all honors maths in my school including APCalc and APStats. I am doing fine with Stats but having a little difficulty with Calc, but i can retake in college right?. I love building things, knowing how things work, I have had almost straight As- lowest grade is a b+.
I was drawn towards aeronautical but i heard you have to be an absolute genius to be able to that. Also electrical, I heard it was practically pure math and I didn't want that. I also thought of becoming an Actuary, but I don't want an accountant type job.
Any thoughts?

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Milo in New Brunswick, New Jersey

50 months ago

You will be fine if you keep it up. You dont have to be a genius for anything, you just have to work hard. I didnt take the classes you took but I keep up with my work and study hard and Im doing fine in Mechanical Engineering. Mechanical and Aeronautical are pretty much the same. Most colleges have the major Mechanical/Aeronautical Engineering, not just Mechanical Engineering or Aeronautical Engineering. You can do electrical if you want but I know it also has more programming classes. Dont let difficulty hold you back, do what you want.

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Alex in San Rafael, California

50 months ago

What classes did you take in High School? Is there a requirement to be able to at least somewhat comprehend what they teach you in college? I can understand very complex concepts in math if I have the time- I have been always busy with sports and have spent a minimal amount of time on the concepts of ideas rather than the processes.Thanks for your previous input of mech. eng, do you know if actuarial science would be a good major to look into? I appreciate any feedback.

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Milo in New Brunswick, New Jersey

50 months ago

I only made it up to Honors Physics in high school. Thats the highest I got to because I didnt realize that I could and should have challenged myself more. Anyone reading this that is doing well in school and not challenging themselves really should consider it. I thought you had to be a genius to take harder classes, but you dont. You just have to work hard.

Anyway, you should learn the processes and concepts and spend a lot of time with your studies; it pays off. Im not sure about actuarial science. You should talk to a guidance counselor.

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oceansociety in Dracut, Massachusetts

50 months ago

I wish I had these questions before I started studying ME.. I just defended my master's thesis last month and finally looking for jobs, and now I am so so lost!! Specialized in nanotechnology.. needless to say I am out of touch with everything mechanical engineering related. I haven't touched proe/solidworks/fea in at least 2 years.. Never did learn much in machining workshops.. all the TAs always wanted to just machine the parts for me whenever I asked a question (I'm a girl). Best I can say is I know how to use a drill press and a table saw :P
Not sure I ever understood tolerancing. And I really don't remember anything I learned from strength of materials or fluid mechs. The only thing that still sort of stuck with me is vibrations because I loved that class, although I can't say I was the smartest kid in class either. The past 2 years I have done mostly material characterization, and a lot of wet chemistry for making nano-structures and testing them. I ran a lot of weird specialized experiments that I don't think most mech engineers do.
So I have no idea what my expertise is.. other than research in general. I know I like running experiments/tests. I have been so far removed from ME that I don't know how I can convince anyone to hire me as one. But the degree(s) that I have is BSME & MSME.. so I am kinda stuck. Will I be expected to know more because I have a masters? or will companies understand that my 'work/research' experiences are not necessarily very mechanical engineering at all? Can they maybe treat me as an entry level person with just a BSME.. cut my losses on the MSME and move on?
Any body who was maybe in the same boat and successfully got back into ME?

Lost and missing 'actual' ME

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