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Walter Parmley

74 months ago

I served as master optician for the southern Ca. college of optometry I may be able to answer some of your optical questions if any.I love answering optical questions when poss.

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Walter Parmley

74 months ago

greetings Imee B, I enjoy your communications, Optometry in the U.S is 4 years of study,also to be accepted to most optometry colleges one might need an undergraduate degree. It would also be a idea to have some form of business or management class behind you also as most students that graduate after four (4) years of study have very litte business skills.

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Jeff in Portland, Oregon

70 months ago

Walter Parmley said: I served as master optician for the southern Ca. college of optometry I may be able to answer some of your optical questions if any.I love answering optical questions when poss.

Thank you for your time.. I have been having trouble with my right eye for some time now..I have been seen by 5 different specialists.. "some of the best in the business" so others say, and they still can't seem to find out whats wrong with my eye. my vision in the right eye only, is badly blurred on some days and some days it's better..does this make any sense for it to go from bad to better and back?? I have even been seen by Dr. Watsky at the eye institute in Portland.. (I guess he is supposed to be one of the best). Just wondering if you had any thouthts.. Thanks....

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Tammy in Marion, Ohio

70 months ago

Walter Parmley said: I served as master optician for the southern Ca. college of optometry I may be able to answer some of your optical questions if any.I love answering optical questions when poss.

Hi ! Iam Having Some trouble with a few Optical quetions, Can You Help?
1) -3.00+1.50x180 has .45 Prism Base Down at 3mm above center ??? Is This Correct?
2) What Percent of Difference In Magnification is there in a 1.7 High Index Lens and a 1.498 Poly Lens in a +7.00 lens ?
Please write back Thanks

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Mike Levine DMD in Monument, Colorado

68 months ago

Hello,

I have a question that I hope you can answer...that others, thus far, haven't been able to. Yesterday I picked up my new glasses (2 pair). They are both progressive lenses with anti-reflective coating in polycarbonate and the frames are partially rimless (essesntially on the bottoms). After picking them up, I was inside working on my computer and the correction for NV seemed fine. When I went outside to drive, I immediately noticed that anything I looked at with horizontal lines (the car in front, signage on the highway, the distant mountains, rooftops of buildings along the highway, etc. ALL had a distinct yellow line along the top horizontal edge, and a blue line along the bottom edge. If I tilted my head back and looked through the near vision (bottom part of the lenses, those colored lines weren't visable (of course distant things appeared blurry). I immediately drove back to the optical store and spoke with the woman that delivered my glasses to me a few hours earlier. When I told her about what I was seeing (the colored lines) she related to me that a few months earlier she had a woman customer that complained of exactly the same problem....but couldn't remember what they did to resolve this lense anomaly. I then spoke to the assistant manager and related the story (he also engaged an optician in the lab and discussed things with him). He first said that a small percentage of people report problems when they wear polycarbonate lenses and said that perhaps I could be one of those. I then handed him a pair of "cheater" reading glasses that I had been using and asked him to have the optician check to see if these were polycarbonate.....they are....and I know I've have progressive lenses years ago (probably polycarbonate) and I never had this type of "colored line" problem. I ended up leaving both pair there...he wants one of the more senior people to evaluate this next week. WHAT COULD BE CAUSING THIS? Thanks in advance for your answer

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Mr. Ross in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

66 months ago

Walter Parmley said: I served as master optician for the southern Ca. college of optometry I may be able to answer some of your optical questions if any.I love answering optical questions when poss.

Greetings i am trying to start a carrer in the Optical field (Optician), but there seems to be no schools in Michigan that provide thaining in this field. Is there some other way i can get my foot in the door.

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Seeing clearly

66 months ago

I'm having the same trouble in the Toledo. Ohio area. I would love to start a career in this field, but the local college discontinued the program. If anyone knows of a position I would love to know about it.

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Kalila P in OC, California

64 months ago

I have a question.. =)

Do you know where there are optical dispensing programs being offered at in the Orange County, CA area besides American Career College?

Thank you!

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Jerry Grosman in Houston, Texas

64 months ago

I have the same problem with my progressive lenses (horizontal lines (the car in front, signage on the highway, the distant mountains, rooftops of buildings along the highway, etc. ALL had a distinct yellow line along the top horizontal edge, and a blue line along the bottom edge.) I had to go to glasses with lines. Did you find the problem. The lines in the glasses are driving me crazy.

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Penney in Surprise, Arizona

63 months ago

Is a refraction for contacts the same as glasses. One doctor told me no, another yes.

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jerridenglish

63 months ago

you must get a password and they put a toolbar on your system and collect info about you. Pass this up.

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Optician in Columbia, South Carolina

63 months ago

Penney in Surprise, Arizona said: Is a refraction for contacts the same as glasses. One doctor told me no, another yes.

Yes, refraction is the basically the same for both eyeglasses and contacts. Having had the experience of doing both for an Ophthalmologist, the visual testing and refraction are the same, except for minor differences that the doctor himself will adjust such as the proper size and type of contact lens for your cornea that may come with the use of a keratometer. This isn't used in an eyeglass refraction.

Opticianworld.com may have more common and practical information for you also.

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Optician in Columbia, South Carolina

63 months ago

Mr. Ross in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan said: Greetings i am trying to start a carrer in the Optical field (Optician), but there seems to be no schools in Michigan that provide thaining in this field. Is there some other way i can get my foot in the door.

You can always apprentice in this field and retail chains will train and then you take the board and done! You are an Optician!

Opticianworld.com talks about this very subject!

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eye2eyeoptical.....

62 months ago

Mike Levine DMD in Monument, Colorado said: Hello,

I have a question that I hope you can answer...that others, thus far, haven't been able to. Yesterday I picked up my new glasses (2 pair). They are both progressive lenses with anti-reflective coating in polycarbonate and the frames are partially rimless (essesntially on the bottoms). After picking them up, I was inside working on my computer and the correction for NV seemed fine. When I went outside to drive, I immediately noticed that anything I looked at with horizontal lines (the car in front, signage on the highway, the distant mountains, rooftops of buildings along the highway, etc. ALL had a distinct yellow line along the top horizontal edge, and a blue line along the bottom edge. If I tilted my head back and looked through the near vision (bottom part of the lenses, those colored lines weren't visable (of course distant things appeared blurry). I immediately drove back to the optical store and spoke with the woman that delivered my glasses to me a few hours earlier. When I told her about what I was seeing (the colored lines) she related to me that a few months earlier she had a woman customer that complained of exactly the same problem....but couldn't remember what they did to resolve this lense anomaly. I then spoke to the assistant manager and related the story (he also engaged an optician in the lab and discussed things with him). He first said that a small percentage of people report problems when they wear polycarbonate lenses and said that perhaps I could be one of those. I then handed him a pair of "cheater" reading glasses that I had been using and asked him to have the optician check to see if these were polycarbonate.....they are....and I know I've have progressive lenses years ago (probably polycarbonate) and I never had this type of "colored line" problem. I ended up leaving both pair there...he wants one of the more senior people to evaluate this next week. WHAT COULD BE CAUSING THIS?

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mark d

62 months ago

the problem is not the polycarbonate lenses, but the way they were cleaned prior to applying the anti reflective coating. all progessive lenses are marked for identification purposes,such as, manufacturer,type of lens the basee and add power.the markings are lasered into the lenses and are permanenet.but there are also markings over theses markings that allow technicians to work with them properly.after the rx is ground into these lenses the outer markings are to be removed properly, unfortunately sometimes that is not the case.if there is residue from these markings when the coatings are applied then you will see the colors that you are describing. the coatings are colorful so basically what you are seeing is the outline of the markings that were not completely taken off during the coating process. if you notice this then you should ask that the lenses be changed at no charge...

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bob in Manchester, New Hampshire

61 months ago

absolutly, there should not be any shadowing of old markings, ask to be redone at no charge

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eye 2 eye optical

61 months ago

i don't know how this happened, but above question on the colored lines in progressives was posted by mark d and eye2eyeoptical offered the response.... thanks

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DT

58 months ago

I HAVE BEEN AN OPTICIAN FOR OVER 30 YEARS AND HAVE WORKED VERY CLOSELY WITH REALLY QUALIFIED OPTOMETRISTS. IN SCHOOL I WAS TAUGHT TO CORRECT WITH A SLAB OFF FOR ANYONE WHO HAS A VERTICAL IMBALANCE OVER 1.25. MY OPTOMETRIST FRIENDS VERY RARELY DO THAT, BECAUSE THEY FEEL MOST PEOPLE HAVE ACCOMADATED OVER THE YEARS TO THIS DIFFERENCE. THAT BRINGS ME TO NOW. I HAVE BEEN SEEING ALOT OF PATIENTS THAT HAVE HAD LASIK SURGERY WITH MONO VISION. NOW WITH BIRTHDAYS THEY HAVE TO WEAR PROGRESSIVE LENSES. THEY SEEMS TO BE HAVING MORE PROBLEMS WEARING THEIR PROGRESSIVE LENSES THAN ANYONE I HAVE EVER FITTED IN THE PAST. I MAKE SURE THEY USE REALLY GOOD QUALITY PROGRESSIVES, THE NEWEST TECH.. DO I HAVE TO CONSIDER SLAB OFF IN A WHOLE NEW WAY. I AM AT MY WITTS END.

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inewton in Moreno Valley, California

58 months ago

DT said: I HAVE BEEN AN OPTICIAN FOR OVER 30 YEARS AND HAVE WORKED VERY CLOSELY WITH REALLY QUALIFIED OPTOMETRISTS. IN SCHOOL I WAS TAUGHT TO CORRECT WITH A SLAB OFF FOR ANYONE WHO HAS A VERTICAL IMBALANCE OVER 1.25. MY OPTOMETRIST FRIENDS VERY RARELY DO THAT, BECAUSE THEY FEEL MOST PEOPLE HAVE ACCOMADATED OVER THE YEARS TO THIS DIFFERENCE. THAT BRINGS ME TO NOW. I HAVE BEEN SEEING ALOT OF PATIENTS THAT HAVE HAD LASIK SURGERY WITH MONO VISION. NOW WITH BIRTHDAYS THEY HAVE TO WEAR PROGRESSIVE LENSES. THEY SEEMS TO BE HAVING MORE PROBLEMS WEARING THEIR PROGRESSIVE LENSES THAN ANYONE I HAVE EVER FITTED IN THE PAST. I MAKE SURE THEY USE REALLY GOOD QUALITY PROGRESSIVES, THE NEWEST TECH.. DO I HAVE TO CONSIDER SLAB OFF IN A WHOLE NEW WAY. I AM AT MY WITTS END.

It's true that slab off amends the vision for reading if there is a quite a difference between the two eyes however if the patient has optioned for mono vision a slab off may no longer be needed,also if the patient has not worn a slab in the past try without it first as the cost in the slab combined with a progressive may shy the patient away from the sale sometimes even if they need it,and if the patient ends up not needing it there might be a refund or a patients regrets over having to pay an unnessasary fee.

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DT

58 months ago

Thanks,
DT

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tonys96 in Grand Prairie, Texas

57 months ago

I see yellow outlines on objects too, but only in one pair of glasses. My optician gave me the same line.....polycarbonate material is the problem. If so. why would that problem not exist in my other poly lenses?????

Waht can I tell the optician to be able to insist that they be fixed?

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inewton in Moreno Valley, California

57 months ago

It's true that polycarbonate has inherent chromatic aberation,(creates rainbows) you may be seeing part of the spectrum (yellow) but actually you should be seeing it out of your other pair which is also poly as you mentioned.Ask your optician to check the base curves on both pair to ensure proper optics also a streach, some manufactures may be mixing poly with acrylic for cost reasons, this may play with the light as it refracts through the matierial.

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inewton in Moreno Valley, California

57 months ago

Mike Levine DMD in Monument, Colorado said: Hello,

I have a question that I hope you can answer...that others, thus far, haven't been able to. Yesterday I picked up my new glasses (2 pair). They are both progressive lenses with anti-reflective coating in polycarbonate and the frames are partially rimless (essesntially on the bottoms). After picking them up, I was inside working on my computer and the correction for NV seemed fine. When I went outside to drive, I immediately noticed that anything I looked at with horizontal lines (the car in front, signage on the highway, the distant mountains, rooftops of buildings along the highway, etc. ALL had a distinct yellow line along the top horizontal edge, and a blue line along the bottom edge. If I tilted my head back and looked through the near vision (bottom part of the lenses, those colored lines weren't visable (of course distant things appeared blurry). I immediately drove back to the optical store and spoke with the woman that delivered my glasses to me a few hours earlier. When I told her about what I was seeing (the colored lines) she related to me that a few months earlier she had a woman customer that complained of exactly the same problem....but couldn't remember what they did to resolve this lense anomaly. I then spoke to the assistant manager and related the story (he also engaged an optician in the lab and discussed things with him). He first said that a small percentage of people report problems when they wear polycarbonate lenses and said that perhaps I could be one of those. I then handed him a pair of "cheater" reading glasses that I had been using and asked him to have the optician check to see if these were polycarbonate.....they are....and I know I've have progressive lenses years ago (probably polycarbonate) and I never had this type of "colored line" problem. I ended up leaving both pair there...he wants one of the more senior people to evaluate this next week. WHAT COULD BE CAUSING THIS?

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francois in Chicago, Illinois

57 months ago

tonys96 in Grand Prairie, Texas said: I see yellow outlines on objects too, but only in one pair of glasses. My optician gave me the same line.....polycarbonate material is the problem. If so. why would that problem not exist in my other poly lenses?????

Waht can I tell the optician to be able to insist that they be fixed?

look at the answer by "mark d, 4 mths ago" its not the lenses its the coating>>>>

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tonys96 in Grand Prairie, Texas

57 months ago

Took them back and had new lenses made. Watched the optician pu the new lenses in...same problem.....could it be that I need to go from polycarbonate to high index material?

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Scott B Raphael,ABOC; FNAO:TND in Los Angeles, California

57 months ago

Mike Levine DMD in Monument, Colorado said: Hello,

I have a question that I hope you can answer...that others, thus far, haven't been able to. Yesterday I picked up my new glasses (2 pair). They are both progressive lenses with anti-reflective coating in polycarbonate and the frames are partially rimless (essesntially on the bottoms). After picking them up, I was inside working on my computer and the correction for NV seemed fine. When I went outside to drive, I immediately noticed that anything I looked at with horizontal lines (the car in front, signage on the highway, the distant mountains, rooftops of buildings along the highway, etc. ALL had a distinct yellow line along the top horizontal edge, and a blue line along the bottom edge. If I tilted my head back and looked through the near vision (bottom part of the lenses, those colored lines weren't visable (of course distant things appeared blurry). I immediately drove back to the optical store and spoke with the woman that delivered my glasses to me a few hours earlier. When I told her about what I was seeing (the colored lines) she related to me that a few months earlier she had a woman customer that complained of exactly the same problem....but couldn't remember what they did to resolve this lense anomaly. I then spoke to the assistant manager and related the story (he also engaged an optician in the lab and discussed things with him). He first said that a small percentage of people report problems when they wear polycarbonate lenses and said that perhaps I could be one of those. I then handed him a pair of "cheater" reading glasses that I had been using and asked him to have the optician check to see if these were polycarbonate.....they are....and I know I've have progressive lenses years ago (probably polycarbonate) and I never had this type of "colored line" problem. I ended up leaving both pair there...he wants one of the more senior people to evaluate this next week. WHAT COULD BE CAUSING THIS?

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tonys96 in Grand Prairie, Texas

57 months ago

Why the repeating of some comments/questions without any answers? Above comment was reposted, yet remains unanswered....

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Scott B Raphael,ABOC; FNAO:TND in Los Angeles, California

57 months ago

mark d said: the problem is not the polycarbonate lenses, but the way they were cleaned prior to applying the anti reflective coating. all progessive lenses are marked for identification purposes,such as, manufacturer,type of lens the basee and add power.the markings are lasered into the lenses and are permanenet.but there are also markings over theses markings that allow technicians to work with them properly.after the rx is ground into these lenses the outer markings are to be removed properly, unfortunately sometimes that is not the case.if there is residue from these markings when the coatings are applied then you will see the colors that you are describing. the coatings are colorful so basically what you are seeing is the outline of the markings that were not completely taken off during the coating process. if you notice this then you should ask that the lenses be changed at no charge...

This may not be the case, because all markings on PAL lenses are one color only. Mostly yellow, but never more then one color and can clearly be seen on the anterior portion of the PAL if not properly cleaned, this will not cause the visual maladies discribed. It seems Dr Levine is seeing blue as well, this could be as a result of the low abbe value in polycarbonate lenses, that is somewhere in the neighborhood of 30 or so, which would cause chromatic abberation combined with the application of the older magnesium flouride A/R coat. This will most likely cause this type of abberation. The newer zinc alloy application seems to reduce these unwanted abberations in most cases.

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Scott B Raphael,ABOC; FNAO:TND in Los Angeles, California

57 months ago

Tammy in Marion, Ohio said: Hi ! Iam Having Some trouble with a few Optical quetions, Can You Help?
1) -3.00+1.50x180 has .45 Prism Base Down at 3mm above center ??? Is This Correct?
2) What Percent of Difference In Magnification is there in a 1.7 High Index Lens and a 1.498 Poly Lens in a +7.00 lens ?
Please write back Thanks

My question is two fold regarding question #1. Why would the prism be put 3 mm above the oc, is it a bifocal? Any prism in the other eye?
To answer question #2 there is no difference in magnifaction per say, but there is a difference in the index of refreaction or the way the light is bending in the a given material which may cause a slight vision change in some individuals

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Scott B Raphael,ABOC; FNAO:TND in Los Angeles, California

57 months ago

Kalila P in OC, California said: I have a question.. =)

Do you know where there are optical dispensing programs being offered at in the Orange County, CA area besides American Career College?

Thank you!

Some of the small local vocational schools offer the same type of training American Career College does. the best bet is to grab the local yellow pages, look under career colleges and ask if they offer dispensing optician programs. the other lest expensive way to go is to see if any of the optical retail chains are hiring, you really do not need to be an optician or have any formal training to be hired and they will train you

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Kasey New Holland, PA, ABOC in New Castle, Delaware

55 months ago

Does anyone happen to know in 1998-99 what was the most popular kodak PAL with transitions?

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a variety of reasons in Gainesville, Virginia

55 months ago

tonys96 in Grand Prairie, Texas said: Took them back and had new lenses made. Watched the optician pu the new lenses in...same problem.....could it be that I need to go from polycarbonate to high index material?

Wouldn't be able to say for sure without taking a look at the current glasses along with the previous. But it could be a number of things 1)deffective coating, 2)base curve, 3)lens is too big and frame is putting too much pressure onlenses,
4)vertex distance

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a variety of reasons in Gainesville, Virginia

55 months ago

tonys96 in Grand Prairie, Texas said: Took them back and had new lenses made. Watched the optician pu the new lenses in...same problem.....could it be that I need to go from polycarbonate to high index material?

Wouldn't be able to say for sure without taking a look at the current glasses along with the previous. But it could be a number of things 1)deffective coating, 2)base curve, 3)lens is too big and frame is putting too much pressure on lenses, 4)vertex distance
Isn't TX a license state? If so they should know whats going on since they have the information of your last lenses and prescription.

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a variety of reasons in Gainesville, Virginia

55 months ago

tonys96 in Grand Prairie, Texas said: Took them back and had new lenses made. Watched the optician pu the new lenses in...same problem.....could it be that I need to go from polycarbonate to high index material?

Wouldn't be able to say for sure without taking a look at the current glasses along with the previous. But it could be a number of things 1)deffective coating, 2)base curve, 3)lens is too big and frame is putting too much pressure on lenses, 4)vertex distance
Rule out the reasons before you spend more money because High Index are more expensive. If it is one of the reasons I stated then the material doesn't matter. Isn't TX a license state? If so they should know whats going on since they have the information of your last lenses and prescription.

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tonys96 in Grand Prairie, Texas

55 months ago

a variety of reasons in Gainesville, Virginia said: Wouldn't be able to say for sure without taking a look at the current glasses along with the previous. But it could be a number of things 1)deffective coating, 2)base curve, 3)lens is too big and frame is putting too much pressure on lenses, 4)vertex distance
Rule out the reasons before you spend more money because High Index are more expensive. If it is one of the reasons I stated then the material doesn't matter. Isn't TX a license state? If so they should know whats going on since they have the information of your last lenses and prescription.

Turned out to be because they were poly....hi-index works just fine!

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davidgolub@aol.com in Huntington Beach, California

44 months ago

Walter, I am looking to work as an optician in the so. Cal. area and am curious to where I go to get licensed. I hold ABOC and NCLE certifications. Does California require licensing?

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wparmley in Los Angeles, California

44 months ago

If your working ina an office where theres an independant Dr. than yes you need the RDO (registered optical dispenser) or the SLD ( specticle lens dispenser) these are medical licenses issued by the state of Ca. Contact the medical board of california and the pull down menu should have optical. Most optical places are requesting this nowdays. Its good to have, ABOC, NCLE, RDO, get them all. If you need addition info . just contact me back.

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eyeguy52 in Cape Coral, Florida

37 months ago

I will be getting my optician license in October, but I have begun to look for work (just to get my foot in the door) and have had no luck. I am assuming because I don't have a license yet, this is killing my chances at getting hired early? Also, most optician positions require at least one year of experience. How am I supposed to get any experience, if no one will even consider me? I have a B.S. Degree, and A.S. in Opticianry, my ABO and my NCLE. I also have over 25+ years of sales and sales/management experience and feel I am very well qualified. This is a career change for me, and I am age 59. Is my age the problem here? I am really frustrated, as I have been unemployed for 7 mos. and have a family to support. Any suggestions? Thank You!

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nick in Medfield, Massachusetts

35 months ago

Walter Parmley said: I served as master optician for the southern Ca. college of optometry I may be able to answer some of your optical questions if any.I love answering optical questions when poss.

I was wondering in the state of massachusetts if an optometrist can open a store and not get in trouble by the board? Usually an optician must be in the store at all times however if a Dr is there 7 days a week at all times would that override an optician being there?

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joy in Scottsdale, Arizona

32 months ago

Walter Parmley said: I served as master optician for the southern Ca. college of optometry I may be able to answer some of your optical questions if any.I love answering optical questions when poss.

i am studying for the abo and ordered study materials.
One of the questions concerns me because I cannot
figure out how they got the answer. 1st of all, It
is my understanding before you do prentice's rule, you
need to change rx to 90 degrees, right? The question
is rx +2.5 -.50 180
+2.5
pd=67

During final inspection, it was determined that the optical centers of the lenses were placed 63 mm apart. How much
total prism will this prodcut, and which direction is the
base? The answer is 1. prism base in.
My concern is that is I change the right eye it would be .4
for that eye and .5 for the left which totals .9. Please
help!!

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krevell in Oxford, United Kingdom

26 months ago

i have blue shades on the whites of my eyes. do you know what this could mean?

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Bo Duncan in Stockbridge, Georgia

26 months ago

I was trying to get an eyelash out of my eye and when I pulled the eye lid down I saw a slight yellow color on my whites. I suffer severe health anxiety (I am always thinking I am going to die) and so immediately I started panicing. Outside of all the life threatening things, are there other reasons for yellow eyes....

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anonymous in Boston, Massachusetts

22 months ago

nick in Medfield, Massachusetts said: I was wondering in the state of massachusetts if an optometrist can open a store and not get in trouble by the board? Usually an optician must be in the store at all times however if a Dr is there 7 days a week at all times would that override an optician being there?

I've worked for a corporate store in MA for decades and the answer is no. A licensed optician has to be in the store at all times. The board will fine you if there isn't a licensed optician on site during a surprise visit.

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anonymous in Boston, Massachusetts

22 months ago

tonys96 in Grand Prairie, Texas said: Took them back and had new lenses made. Watched the optician pu the new lenses in...same problem.....could it be that I need to go from polycarbonate to high index material?

There's no way to diagnose for sure where the problem came. It's agreed that it came from the process of coating the lenses whether it be from markings or the AR. Even watching the optician put the actual lenses in the frame doesn't mean the lenses were made right. Remember, most optical shops have "finishing labs". They only cut the lenses after they've already been ground and coated. Even if switching from poly to high index solved the problem, you have to think "what if they manufactured the lenses properly this time?" I'm not saying that some people aren't intolerant to poly. I'm just saying a lot of times people just blame it on polycarb because it's an easy excuse. Most labs have some type of warrantee for remakes anyway.
I've worked for many optical shops including franchises and larger corporations. Depending on the product/brands you're going to get different results. I.E. Lenses from Walmart might scratch easier Vs a Zeiss or Essilor product. It's like buying store brand products vs name brand at the grocery store. They might look the same but they're not made exactly the same. Don't expect to see as good in a $99 progressive vs a $700. Simple as that.
I suggest reordering the lenses in the same material first then if it doesn't work upgrade to high index. If the shop refuses it's time to take your business elsewhere.

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