Has anyone here done a working interview?

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Laura in Fort Wayne, Indiana

100 months ago

So I went in today and did a working interview for a clinic in Indy. Has anyone on here ever done one (I am assuming at least SOME people have, haha). If so, how did it go? What all did you end up doing? I was told the things I would be doing at my working interview, so I was planning on doing pretty much just that. She said I would be doing a dental, placing IV catheter(s), and running a fecal and urinalysis. She said my interview would probably last from 9:30 to about 11 or 11:30. I was there for close to 4 hours. I kind of thought that was a good sign, since she felt like I was actually of use and not a nuisance.

I ended up attempting to place 2 catheters, but only successfully placed one. I restrained for exams for the doctor for the surgery patients. I ran a fecal and examined it on the microscope. I ended up assisting in surgery such as clipping/scrubbing a dog that was getting a spay done. I monitored anesthesia. I guess one of the "techs" (and I say this because she had on the job training; started as a receptionist and considers herself a tech. Lame.) was busy up front, so I heard the doctor yell for me when I was in the middle of looking at a fecal, and she asked me to draw up .3 ml of Bupvicaine to put on the incision to numb the area. Didn't even ask to see how much I had drew up, so at that point I felt like she was confident in my skills and trusted that I could do a good job.

Everything she had me do, I did without a question. So I thought she was thoroughly impressed. When I was clipping for the spay, she came in once and goes, "Looking good", then she came back in when I was finishing it up and getting ready to scrub the surgical site, she goes, "I think that's the best abdomen I've seen all week".

Truth be told, I honestly felt like I was a member of the team because I was doing stuff I wasn't even expecting to do or she was confident I could do something without a question. What do you guys think?

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gnash in Hendersonville, North Carolina

99 months ago

i had a 'working' interview with a clinic but it was the office end of things. i'm surprised they'd allow someone to handle animals and medications with such casualness when they weren't actually employed by the place (insurance?). can't say as i'm crazy about your attitude per job-trained vet techs. that's how most people have been trained for decades. i'd hope you would look to them for information. did you end up getting the job? sounds like it was a busy place.

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Laura in Fort Wayne, Indiana

99 months ago

gnash in Hendersonville, North Carolina said: i had a 'working' interview with a clinic but it was the office end of things. i'm surprised they'd allow someone to handle animals and medications with such casualness when they weren't actually employed by the place (insurance?). can't say as i'm crazy about your attitude per job-trained vet techs. that's how most people have been trained for decades. i'd hope you would look to them for information. did you end up getting the job? sounds like it was a busy place.

I'm sorry, but I just don't feel someone should call themselves a tech just cause they had on the job training. I feel an assistant would be a better title. To me it's the equivalent of a medical assistant calling themselves a nurse. You may feel differently, but that's personally how I feel about the matter. It's insulting to me that I had to go through a very vigorous and extensive program, study my ass off to take my boards in order to hopefully become an RVT.. and most of these doctors sometimes would rather hire someone who should technically be an assistant. And most of the time the "on the job trained" people might know HOW something is done, but I've had the education and know WHY something is done. I can't imagine that a doctor would take the time to teach them everything an RVT would know. Again, it's a matter of personal opinion.

And no, I didn't end up getting the job. I think the doctor decided not to hire someone cause they weren't a very busy practice. They were only open for a year and there were only two other girls working there. I, however, did have two interviews the past two weeks. My most recent being this week and I got a working interview/day of observing. And I think I'll possibly get hired into that one. Especially since the practice manager was talking to me about apartments in the area and suggesting apartments for me to look at on my lunch break, since I would have to move an hour and a half away.

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Eddie in Indianapolis, Indiana

95 months ago

My wife went on a 'working interview' at a vet place in Bargersville, Indiana (about 45 min. away from us in Indy) last year and didn't get hired but worked for 3 hours there. She did about the same thing you did on your interview. I wondered about the 'working interview' as I had never heard of it but I figured it was legit. A few weeks ago she was interviewing for another position at a different place and they wanted her to do the same thing. I decided to look it up and low and behold THEY ARE SUPPOSED TO PAY YOU for the time you work (per Indiana State Law), regardless if you are hired or not. I confirmed this with the Indiana State Labor Board. I immediatley contacted the Vets office and they had nothing to say about it and they were kinda 'smug' about it like 'oh no, you caught us' kind of an attitude. I told them I would send them a bill for services rendered and I did. They are now sending us a check for the (3) hours that she worked. It is minimum wage but at least it is something for her time. THEY KNOW THEY ARE SUPPOSED TO PAY YOU AND THEY TRY TO GET AWAY WITHOUT PAYING. Did you notice how busy they were? My wife said that the office where she went was VERY BUSY and now I am thinking that this is just a way for them to get free labor when they are short on help, and the person that is working won't say anything because they are hoping they will get a job. CONTACT THEM AND TELL THEM YOU WANT PAID FOR YOUR TIME. By State law, if they do not pay you, you have a right to DOUBLE THE AMOUNT BY LAW. Tell them this if they say no. The labor board emailed us and they said to use their email stating the law as proof if they said no. I printed it out along with a bill and mailed it to them with signiture confirmation. Her interview was last December so don't be worried about it being too late. GET YOUR MONEY. THEY OWE YOU.

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Rachel in Decatur, Indiana

94 months ago

Hey Laura. I'm going to Brown Mackie for surge tech. You seem ahead of me on the game. Could you possibly e-mail me so i could ask you a few questions? It would be greatly appreciated. racheltharp@yahoo.com
Thank you!

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Rachel in Decatur, Indiana

94 months ago

lol, omg i'm blind, you're a vet tech. i searched for surgical tech, long day, just had finals n i'm beat.

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Laura, RVT in Fort Wayne, Indiana

94 months ago

I've actually done two working interviews and I didn't get paid for either of them. One of them was actually where I am working now. I actually don't mind not being paid for working interviews since I am trying to get a job and don't want to decrease my chances of getting the job by demanding I be paid. If I'm not having to do much driving to get to the interview, then it doesn't bother me as much. There was one interview where I went to and was there the whole day. They called it a working interview, but I didn't really do anything. It was more so observing.

But the clinic I went to for a working interview (in my original post), they weren't busy at all really. There were two other girls working there. And there weren't any actual animals there besides for the couple surgeries she had. But that was it.

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liz in San Antonio, Texas

92 months ago

Wow you couldn't be any more a jerk could you? Most of "On the job trained techs" have in my opinion (11 years working) Are MUCH more qualified then every unseasoned RVT (less then 3 years) I have ever meet.

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gnash in Hendersonville, North Carolina

92 months ago

probably shouldn't reply to the last one, but there's such a thing now about having certification/degrees/whatever and it's a recent thing - not something people considered much years ago. for some reasons, getting certified helps regulate the type of care someone gets from a clinic. for other reasons, the whole process is a bit of a racket - by the organizations, by the state, even nationally - to make money off of students. some students have already been working on the job as TECHS but wanted the officialness of certification - and so got the schooling. which, for those who don't know already, is really tough to do when you're trying to work. the school here offers no options to their class schedules.

i've gone on to other things with the education as tech as part of my resume but not my main focus. i agree with Eddie who's wife went on 'working interviews' - they need to be paying for these. i used to get paid (in a different profession) for getting "tried-out". and students need all the money they can get for their trouble. so if an interview starts feeling like on-the-job training, get paid for it. obviously they can afford it and you can't. good luck.

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lvt2010 in Woodbridge, Virginia

71 months ago

In some states it is illegal to call yourself a "tech" unless you have completed a 2 year accredited program and passed the boards...

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lvt2010 in Woodbridge, Virginia

71 months ago

In some states, it is ILLEGAL to call yourself a "tech" unless you have completed an accredited program and passed the boards...

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cindyrvt in Henderson, Texas

71 months ago

Yep and credentialing and education is far from recent. I can speak for Texas on exactly how long it's been going on here--a degree in veterinary technology was available as long ago as the early 1970's.

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John Clements in Antioch, California

10 months ago

lvt2010 in Woodbridge, Virginia said: In some states, it is ILLEGAL to call yourself a "tech" unless you have completed an accredited program and passed the boards...

Yes, but I have a bachelor's degree in zoology, an associates in science,and over a year experience rehabing wildlife, I think that would make me more qualified than someone with the equivalent of an associates degree (certified technician)...You do not need to go to school to take and pass the board exams in my state (Oregon) but rather have at least a year of vet tech experience or a combination of experience and education. Once you pass the exam you are certified. On the job training can be as valuable if not more so than schooling, often the latter is the case. So step off your pedestal,freshman,you're not that "cool".

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John Clements in Antioch, California

10 months ago

With that being said,if she can get certified in your state, she should.

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cindyrvt in Henderson, Texas

9 months ago

None of those other educational achievements provide the same education on knowledge and skills that a veterinary technology degree do.

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John Clements in Portland, Oregon

9 months ago

cindyrvt in Henderson, Texas said: None of those other educational achievements provide the same education on knowledge and skills that a veterinary technology degree do.

You're absolutely right, they provide WAY MORE knowledge and experience. Sorry I just don't have much respect for your "degree". Go back to school and study zoology or a real scientific field and then you can claim to have more knowledge than someone with my skill set.

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John Clements in Portland, Oregon

9 months ago

There's No way you could ever convince me that your junior college was able to teach you more than I've learned from a 4 year course taken at a state university (Zoology) plus a 2 year science degree with a Biology base from my junior college, combined with over a year of medical experience from wildlife rehab. You have at best 90 credit hours of experience while I have AT LEAST as much medical training and way more knowledge of animal Biology, Physiology, Anatomy, and Natural History than your pathetic 2 year degree would have afforded you. You will find that MOST of your experience will come from on-the job training rather than school ( this is where you learn things for yourself through practice rather than being told or shown things in a class room). So change your attitude about it, seriously. Those people you're bitching about have WAY more experience than you do, so just get over it. It's probably annoying that someone was able to learn more than you without paying for the schooling, but it's possible in pretty much any field. Especially when you have a 2-year degree. There are Doctors out there who never officially graduated from an accredited medical school or PhD program but were able to prove themselves through other means ( this isn't common at all but it happens). Albert Einstein for example...Never went to college but was at the top of his field, above those who had.

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cindyrvt in Henderson, Texas

9 months ago

I'm very sorry that you feel so threatened. My point was that "related degrees" such as biology and zoology do not cover the information and skills commonly used by veterinary technicians. That is why veterinary technology degrees are designed in the way that they are--to meet the specific requirements for a veterinary technician in a practice setting.

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John Clements in Portland, Oregon

9 months ago

I'm not threatened at all, just annoyed by the attitudes toward on-the-job training and alternative pathways (which are often more rigorous and difficult to achieve than traditional education). It's more the fact of seeing the egotists on here that elicited the response I gave. Our educational pathways are different but it's important to realize that like I said, although I hold no vet tech degree I still have more animal based knowledge (most likely) and can still take X-rays and draw blood with the best of them. I still have experience in Mending wounds, in patient exams, euthanasia, maybe not as much knowledge of medications that may or may not be used at a particular clinic, but I know about the medications I use and what they treat. What's more I've taken practice VTNE exams and passed with flying colors (for fun). Most of it is simple unit conversions or common sense. My point was that just because someone doesn't have a vet tech degree doesn't mean they are know-nothings or inexperienced or that you are more qualified to call yourself a tech simply because you hold that degree/ certification. The main differential there is the pathway they took to get where they are. If you want to fixate on the beaurocracies involved that's your own problem, just have some humility is all I'm saying.

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