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Comments (10)

Leslie Warthman in Columbus, Ohio

68 months ago

Why is there so muchthese days that never even gets responded to? I sends personal material out to handfuls of employers looking to hire someone in a position I see open that looks like I would be an ideal candidate (not boasting- meaning this seriously because of descriptions matching my knowledge and experience!). So what's the deal with most of them not even sending a "Dear John"- nothing at all? It makes me highly suspect that I am not even reaching anyone real, or, are all these attempts to apply just lost in internet space or some spam block junk box?

Where are all the REAL companies who need me to contribute to their success?

Desperate for an offer- Deal me in!
Leslie

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Midnight in Henderson, Nevada

66 months ago

Leslie Warthman in Columbus, Ohio said: Why is there so much these days that never even gets responded to? I sends personal material out to handfuls of employers looking to hire someone in a position I see open that looks like I would be an ideal candidate

Well, with all due respect, and I may be assuming too much about you...maybe people are looking for someone who can type and phrase themselves properly when they "sends" personal material to them?

If you can't write and express yourself in a manner that appears literate, never mind also professional, people aren't going to take you seriously. Most of the time you really AREN'T reaching a human being--HR programs that automatically scan and prioritize entries to save their people time and effort may be disqualifying you because your resume doesn't feature the right skill-set, or you wrote a cover letter that had some issue of phrasing/grammar/spelling and that kind of thing always gets you thrown out in the first round of applicants, no "Dear John" even going out because it's not worth their time. Move on.

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LMAO in Columbus, Ohio

60 months ago

Midnight in Henderson, Nevada said: Well, with all due respect, and I may be assuming too much about you...maybe people are looking for someone who can type and phrase themselves properly when they "sends" personal material to them?

If you can't write and express yourself in a manner that appears literate, never mind also professional, people aren't going to take you seriously. Most of the time you really AREN'T reaching a human being--HR programs that automatically scan and prioritize entries to save their people time and effort may be disqualifying you because your resume doesn't feature the right skill-set, or you wrote a cover letter that had some issue of phrasing/grammar/spelling and that kind of thing always gets you thrown out in the first round of applicants, no "Dear John" even going out because it's not worth their time. Move on.

I totally agree with Midnight. Your presentation on here was shabby at best. Employers don't want that type of employees working for them. Most employers want literate individuals that present themselves in a professional manner. Those same companies will hire and train those individuals that have presentation of self and act in a professional manner. It's not so much what you say as to how you phrase it; professionalism always envelopes numerous aspects of ones self, not just a resume showing where you have worked or went to school. Your cover letter should be brief and speak clearly who you are and what you are about.

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Come on, writers in Columbus, Ohio

37 months ago

I always find it interesting to see those "LMAO"-ing at others regarding their writing ability, when they themselves make numerous errors in their own post. Who of us hasn't slipped and typoed an "s" at the end of the word in hasty messaging, causing the intended 1st person verbage to accidentally become 3rd person?

This message board isn't a resume or a cover letter, after all!

Mr. or Ms. LMAO, if you ever would revisit this thread, one does not say "type of employees", but "type of employee", "type" indicating the singular, but the "s" after "employee" pluralizing that noun. So, you typed an incorrect "s" just as the original poster did. Additionally, it is not "individuals that", but "individuals who", speaking of human beings rather than of inanimate objects.

I would not have called you out on this matter, had you been more helpful and less insulting to the OP in the first place. You too, "Midnight". There is a better way to correct others, which leads to growth. Your "Move on" at the end of your statement seems disdainful and if you'll pardon me, a bit arrogant!

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Chadman

37 months ago

Well said. Thank you. I was thinking the same thing.

Bottom line, it's just a horrible job market for most applicants and the employers are loving it even though they say in letters to me they have been just overwhelmed with their number of responses.

Yeah, I want to say back to them, "What part of 20 million people out of work" do you not understand or have you been living under a rock for the past several years?"

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tired in Lewisville, North Carolina

37 months ago

Leslie, back to your original question about why employers don’t respond to qualified applicants… here’s what I’ve been finding.
1. Most of those jobs are fake. They are posted because:
a) HR is churning the waters in order to justify their own jobs, or
b) A recruiter is trying to collect resumes or manufacture a job, or
c) The company is fishing for a “perfect” candidate who doesn’t exist, or
d) The company is just looking to see what talent might be out there, or
e) The company is pretending to be expanding and successful, but they’re not.
2. The company does have a need, but they don’t want to spend any money (hire).
3. Useless HR cannot match skills to needs. Worse, although they expect expert professionalism from you they do not think that they should be professional in return.
4. The company backed out of its promise to fill the position, and is too embarrassed or too unprofessional to admit it. They’d rather remain faceless.
5. Their vague advertisement caused an overwhelming number of responses, so they’re taking the unprofessional way out by ignoring everybody.

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yu said it all in Lewis Center, Ohio

37 months ago

Touché
I agree with all the possibilities; shameful as they are!

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Gerard Valentino in Pickerington, Ohio

37 months ago

With all due respect, that answer is unacceptable. You decide to market jobs via the internet, not the job candidates. We expect to be treated like a party in a business transaction and in the last few years, the HR community has forgotten that.

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c_ransom in Brunswick, Ohio

37 months ago

Wow! You said it! Good job putting their ignorant added in check. We are on here to help each other not to dogg each other. Obviously they have too much free time to be on here critiquing to the extent they did. Comon be mature adults, don't be such a lame.

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Also Looking in Marion, Ohio

36 months ago

There is no "business transaction" unless both parties are interested in conducting business. I recently applied for a position, with one opening, that had almost 1600 respondents. If you think that sending out 1599 rejections is good use of manpower and resources, I'm afraid you are mistaken. If you do not get a reply...you have your answer!

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