Must Have Reliable Transportation

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

43 months ago

I've seen that many times and for jobs that don't require you to drive around as part of the job. Even a newer can can have troubles. Nothing is 100% reliable ever.

They probably don't want someone with a crappy car parking in their lot. LOL I have no idea what they expect since any car can break down or heaven forbid, have an accident or flat tire.

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

43 months ago

The next thing they'll say is must have reliable health. You are never allowed to get sick or injured. If you are sick, come in anyway. Just bring your hospital bed with you. :D

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

43 months ago

I agree with you Designer Bee. I never even thought about this, but this is another way that employers will screen you out.

Here in the Philadelphia area, there are some companies that you have to have a car to get to. And there are some that are accessible by pubic transportation.

Back in early '99, I worked for Kelly Services at a company out in the western suburbs of Philadelphia. I had to catch the bus in downtown Philadelphia (where I was living at the time) in order to get out there. There were times in the morning that we got stuck in traffic on the Schuykill Expressway.

After that job ended, they sent me on an interview to another company. When I got there, the woman asked me how long it would take for me to get there. She said that she had a lot of people coming in from Philly who ended up leaving because of the transportation. I told her that she was better off finding someone who had a car. That same day, at quarter after five, this girl from Kelly calls me, and she was upset because I told her that I wanted to work out in the area. Well it's not fair to them, to the client, or even myself to have to work there and have to worry abut transportation. I am not going to be stuck out in God's country with no way to get back.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

43 months ago

designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin said: The next thing they'll say is must have reliable health. You are never allowed to get sick or injured. If you are sick, come in anyway. Just bring your hospital bed with you. :D

Great thinking Designer Bee. I never even thought about that one. If you go onto www.ripoffreport.com, and check "Employers", you will read about people who lost their jobs because they were sick.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

43 months ago

designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin said: The next thing they'll say is must have reliable health. You are never allowed to get sick or injured. If you are sick, come in anyway. Just bring your hospital bed with you. :D

Great thinking Designer Bee. I never even thought about that. If you go to www.ripoffreport.com, and click on "Employers", you will find some stories on there about people losing their jobs because they were sick.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

43 months ago

Sorry for the double posting.

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Polly Ann in San Leandro, California

43 months ago

I would take it to mean any transportation that will get you to work on time; i.e. bus, train, car, etc. But in essence, no transportation is 100% reliable.

I usual see the reliable transportation wording on specific jobs where you may have to work in the middle of the night or on-call, such as security or working in a hospital. After all, buses and trains don't run 24/7, so in those type of jobs you would either have to have a car or someone very dedicated to giving you a ride when you need it.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

43 months ago

My last job was also out in the western suburbs of Philadelphia. Since they had flexible hours, I would leave my house at 9:30 to catch the bus, and there's no heavy traffic on the Blue Route and the Schuykill Expressway. But coming back, it's jammed packed.

The job I had before, which was also located out in the suburbs, had a bus that picked you up at the train station and take you right into the office complex.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

43 months ago

Polly Ann in San Leandro, California said: I would take it to mean any transportation that will get you to work on time; i.e. bus, train, car, etc. But in essence, no transportation is 100% reliable.

I usual see the reliable transportation wording on specific jobs where you may have to work in the middle of the night or on-call, such as security or working in a hospital. After all, buses and trains don't run 24/7, so in those type of jobs you would either have to have a car or someone very dedicated to giving you a ride when you need it.

I agree with you on that Polly Ann. There are also outside sales jobs where you have to have a car.

Talk about working at night. I used to work at this market research place that's located about 20 minutes from where I live. Most of the work there was at night. They had very little daytime calling. I had to stop calling at ten minutes to nine to catch this one bus that came right after nine o'clock. If I missed that one, the next one wasn't until near ten o'clock. After 8:30, the buses ran every hour.

There were some nights that I didn't go in because if either heavy rain, ice, snow, and even thunderstorms. I cannot stand for long periods of time, especially at a bus stop in bad weather. Most of the people there had cars and most of them didn't go in my direction. In fact, one of my co-workers would not let anybody into her car for insurance reasons. Another co-worker took me and two others home, but then he left the company.

Another co-worker (who this guy took home with me), lives up in the Olney section of Philadelphia. She took four means of public transportation to get home. She didn't get home until between 11:30 and midnight and she went through some of the worst neighborhoods of Philadelphia.

When I left this company, I let them know that they needed to hire people who had their own transportation. I will now never work at night again.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

43 months ago

Here's another thing about the company that I told you about; the one where most of the calling is done at night.

I had a co-worker whose car was broken and she couldn't afford to get it fixed. She had to wait until her husband came home from work so that she could use his car in order to get to work, and the office manager said something to her about it. She later left the firm before I did.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

43 months ago

Also, employers need to be aware of what public transit routes they're on. Most of them don't even know the bus routes. That's because they drive and they don't have to worry about public transportation.

They should keep public transit schedules available for those who don't have a car.

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Dee in Baltimore, Maryland

23 months ago

This is one of the main reasons why it's difficult for me to find a job. I live in Baltimore City and most of the jobs that I see are located in the surrounding counties where there is no public transportation.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

23 months ago

Dee in Baltimore, Maryland said: This is one of the main reasons why it's difficult for me to find a job. I live in Baltimore City and most of the jobs that I see are located in the surrounding counties where there is no public transportation.

I can work around the "reliable transportation" question/ requirement when it's near mass transit, but I feel your pain about the limited service areas. Do you find job postings inaccurately list the location as if having the nearest major city is close enough?

There's a trend here requiring a valid driver's license for state or city jobs that traditionally don't involve fieldwork, site visits, or driving. One position stated it might involve working at one of two city sites not far from each other and near mass transit (a job that by definition required being deskbound).

The irony is that requirement is usually posted just above the anti-discrimination statement, and near the "you must meet all the requirements to be considered" statement.

There's also a trend of employers asking about the length of your commute; while I don't want a long commute, I'll do it for the right job. I'm a grownup, I'm not in a high-turnover, entry level field; I can decide if the commute is worth it.

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

23 months ago

jenab in Austin, Texas said:

There's also a trend of employers asking about the length of your commute; while I don't want a long commute, I'll do it for the right job. I'm a grownup, I'm not in a high-turnover, entry level field; I can decide if the commute is worth it.

I hate that when they ask about driving that far. No one wants to drive that far, but if you want to work, sometimes you just have to. If I didn't want to drive that far, why would I apply? Stop asking me stupid questions.

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Bluetea in Texas

23 months ago

designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin said: I hate that when they ask about driving that far. No one wants to drive that far, but if you want to work, sometimes you just have to. If I didn't want to drive that far, why would I apply? Stop asking me stupid questions.

When I was with the bank, the unwritten commute was 10 miles from the branch - no further.

If Brittany called in sick, they wanted you, on your way in, within 30 minutes.

Of course, they would never admit to this.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

23 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: When I was with the bank, the unwritten commute was 10 miles from the branch - no further.

If Brittany called in sick, they wanted you, on your way in, within 30 minutes.

Of course, they would never admit to this.

Of course not!

I had to practically go Norma-Rae on one company when they moved sites and had a very strict attendance policy (you logged in via the phone at your desk, and you could not log in 30 seconds late without incurring an "incident" unless you were exempt from OT, which I wasn't at the time). The bus route that went to the new location was changed to a cross town route that crossed two major highways, and didn't run frequently, so a bunch of us were always either about very early, or late -- as a group.

I kept on HR and upper management with full documentation on why we had limited control on this, and eventually we "documented" regular users of mass transit could get relief from the rules when the bus was late. If this was simply a Texas company and not a multinational one I suspect we'd all have been right-to-worked out of our jobs pretty quickly.

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

23 months ago

If that was Wisconsin (or any state that gets snow), there would be plenty of late for work people. You can't control the weather or road conditions. You can't even predict how long it will take to get there. Who knows if there's an accident on the highway slowing down traffic.

My husband's employer wants them to call in at least 2 hours before start time to say they are going to be sick. For some this might mean calling in at 2:30 am since they start at 4:30 am. I don't think any supervisors will get out of bed to answer a phone. So what if you call in one hour before. Is it really going to make a difference?

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

23 months ago

A law firm in town would advertise open positions. At least one ad specified that candidates must live within twenty miles of the firm. Why? Why twenty miles? What difference did it make as long one arrived on time for work? I would wonder if specifying a distance requirement is discriminatory.

We will get snowstorms that snarl traffic. In that case, one bites the bullet, gets up thirty minutes early or whatever, and leaves with enough time to arrive on time for work. Or at least that's what I believed was the right thing to do and and did.

I always arrived at least an hour or two hours early in my last job, every day, rain or shine, so getting up extra early on snow days was a non-issue. I would come in early because I wanted the quiet time. On snow days, most other people at my job arrived a half hour late, including one person who had grown up in Alaska. Nothing was said to them about being late for work.

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Dee in Baltimore, Maryland

23 months ago

I think that employers post that job applicants must have reliable transportation because they wanna weed out "low-class" individuals. There's a job posting that I read that stated "must have reliable transportation" and the job is on one of the most frequent running bus lines in the city that I am very familiar with, being that I've been riding on this particular bus line since the late 90s.

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designer bee in Waukesha, Wisconsin

23 months ago

Even reliable transportation can get a flat tire or have other problems. No car is perfect.

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ToBoeingOrNotToBoeing in Seattle, Washington

23 months ago

Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania said: Have any of you guys come across jobs that say "Must have reliable transportation?" I feel that this question is way too vague. What do they mean by "reliable transportation?"

I don't have a car. I take public transportation. Yes there are some bus and train delays, but what if your car breaks down and you have to have fixed? Buses, just like cars, get stuck in traffic too; as well as break down.

What do employers expect us to do? Go back to the days of the Pioneers and start walking? They need to be more clear on "reliable transportation."

I totally agree with you about this. They are really trying to weed out people who take public transportation or are impoverished and drive a clunker. They've probably had bad experiences before with people not showing up and making that excuse. But people who drive make excuses, too.

Or it could be like they want you to go do errands periodically, like pick up pizza for lunch or run to the post office.

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ToBoeingOrNotToBoeing in Seattle, Washington

23 months ago

jenab in Austin, Texas said: I can work around the "reliable transportation" question/ requirement when it's near mass transit, but I feel your pain about the limited service areas. Do you find job postings inaccurately list the location as if having the nearest major city is close enough?

There's a trend here requiring a valid driver's license for state or city jobs that traditionally don't involve fieldwork, site visits, or driving. One position stated it might involve working at one of two city sites not far from each other and near mass transit (a job that by definition required being deskbound).

The irony is that requirement is usually posted just above the anti-discrimination statement, and near the "you must meet all the requirements to be considered" statement.

There's also a trend of employers asking about the length of your commute; while I don't want a long commute, I'll do it for the right job. I'm a grownup, I'm not in a high-turnover, entry level field; I can decide if the commute is worth it.

Such good points. I didn't have a car for a year in 2009 because someone hit me and I needed the insurance money to survive.

What I figured I'd do is one of two things - take the bus as far as I could go and ride my bike the rest of the way, locking it somewhere nearby but not at work.

But most likely what I'd do is rent a cheap car for two weeks and charge it to my credit card and try to buy a car as quick as possible and/or try to network quickly with co-workers and see if one of them would let me carpool with them.

What I find is that so much of each and every step I've done in this process lately has been on faith and I've been unable to see how I was gonna get through things until I took the risk and just applied anyway.

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jenab in Austin, Texas

23 months ago

ToBoeingOrNotToBoeing in Seattle, Washington said: Such good points. I didn't have a car for a year in 2009 because someone hit me and I needed the insurance money to survive.

What I figured I'd do is one of two things - take the bus as far as I could go and ride my bike the rest of the way, locking it somewhere nearby but not at work.

But most likely what I'd do is rent a cheap car for two weeks and charge it to my credit card and try to buy a car as quick as possible and/or try to network quickly with co-workers and see if one of them would let me carpool with them.

What I find is that so much of each and every step I've done in this process lately has been on faith and I've been unable to see how I was gonna get through things until I took the risk and just applied anyway.

Sorry to hear that; it's amazing how easy it is for something like that to cause chaos. I know of more than one person who lost their jobs because they didn't have enough insurance and had long commutes.

Great suggestions.

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Jamiroquiet in Miami Beach, Florida

9 months ago

Well if that were anywhere in Florida it would mean you need to have a reliable car. Public transportation is severely lacking in Florida. I live in the Miami area where the PT system is the best that Florida has to offer and you still need a car here to get around. However there are employers who are pretty snotty down here and don't want people who take the bus to work at their firms. Taking the bus down here is not like taking the bus in NYC or San Francisco or London, England. Virtually everyone down here who takes PT is at the bottom of the socioeconomic barrel, except for the occasional (and I do mean VERY occasional) eco/vegan nut who hates cars. I personally think that PT should be improved in every city in America.

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EdwardDooley7309 in Quezon City, Philippines

9 months ago

It's really confusing if they will ask you regarding "reliable transportation" and if you are in a far away location from your work the only thing to do to ensure that the transportation is not a problem is to have an apartment.

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Agent Zero in Folsom, California

9 months ago

Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania said: Have any of you guys come across jobs that say "Must have reliable transportation?" I feel that this question is way too vague. What do they mean by "reliable transportation?"

I don't have a car. I take public transportation. Yes there are some bus and train delays, but what if your car breaks down and you have to have fixed? Buses, just like cars, get stuck in traffic too; as well as break down.

What do employers expect us to do? Go back to the days of the Pioneers and start walking? They need to be more clear on "reliable transportation."

You would not qualify for a position that requires 'reliable transportation.' By that being in the job description, it is saying that there will be driving involved. If you are public trans, you won't be able to drive anywhere. So, don't apply for those positions.

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Beee in Henderson, Nevada

9 months ago

Whenever I have been asked if I have reliable transportation they really just mean a way to work.. Most of the time they don't ask specifically if I have my own car but some do. They just don't want someone that will be calling in because their ride cancelled. These jobs weren't even for positions that require me to drive around for them.

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