Bachelors degree in Biology, what can you do with it?

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njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey

31 months ago

[QUOTE who="volunteer throughout my senior year (perhaps the Bronx Zoo, NY Aquarium, or another sector within the NYC Dept. of Parks and Recreation) .

I suggest you look at salaries of zookeepers etc, before wasting your time. Getting a teaching cert is actually sadly a much better investment. Realize that the average BS grad comes in as a "technician" for 25-35k (often as a temp with no benefits). You'll need a PhD to make any "real" money, and even then nothing's gauranteed and thats after a string of low paid post docs.

Why not get into an accelerated RN program or apply to med/pharm/dental/OT/PT school?

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Paola in Hallandale, Florida

31 months ago

Hi everyone....I have been in the U.S. from the past 5 years. I am majoring in Biology (BS). My current GPA is 3.8. I would love to work as a virologist.I was planning to get my master in virology as soon as I finishes my Bio major in Fall (2013). I am 26 years old, I do not not have any work experience in this country. Does anyone know about this field? Thank you so much.....

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Nicholas in Flushing, New York

31 months ago

njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey said: [QUOTE who="volunteer throughout my senior year (perhaps the Bronx Zoo, NY Aquarium, or another sector within the NYC Dept. of Parks and Recreation) .

I suggest you look at salaries of zookeepers etc, before wasting your time. Getting a teaching cert is actually sadly a much better investment. Realize that the average BS grad comes in as a "technician" for 25-35k (often as a temp with no benefits). You'll need a PhD to make any "real" money, and even then nothing's gauranteed and thats after a string of low paid post docs.

Why not get into an accelerated RN program or apply to med/pharm/dental/OT/PT school?

I am aware that the salaries for such positions are quite low, but I do not consider such a pursuit a waste of time...just yet. I want to see what I am capable of outside of college before changing my career path. I do not want to be a zookeeper, though, I'm aiming to be a field biologist. If all is not looking well a year after graduating and heavy job hunting, I am definitely (must emphasize definitely) going to go the RN route or HS teacher route. My girlfriend recently changed paths from media to nursing (she wants to be a midwife), and she has been pushing me to enter a nursing program as well. There is a university around here that offers a good program for people who have a bachelors, so it's something to consider. For now, though, one step at a time.

May I ask what you do?
I greatly appreciate your reply, thanks.

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njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey

31 months ago

Nicholas in Flushing, New York said: I am aware that the salaries for such positions are quite low, but I do not consider such a pursuit a waste of time...just yet. I want to see what I am capable of outside of college before changing my career path. I do not want to be a zookeeper, though, I'm aiming to be a field biologist. If all is not looking well a year after graduating and heavy job hunting, I am definitely (must emphasize definitely) going to go the RN route or HS teacher route. My girlfriend recently changed paths from media to nursing (she wants to be a midwife), and she has been pushing me to enter a nursing program as well. There is a university around here that offers a good program for people who have a bachelors, so it's something to consider. For now, though, one step at a time.

May I ask what you do?
I greatly appreciate your reply, thanks.

I graduated into a contract job for the USDA. It was "field work" of sorts, that involved me breeding flowers etc. It was pretty cool I guess but paid $12 an hour and involved standing in the summer sun all day. After I bounced between temp jobs. I worked another few months in a food chemistry lab and at a pharma company in the northeast QC. I found all the jobs available to BS/MS bio grads are pretty much just temporary lab serf jobs.

I'm going for an Medical technologist/Medical Lab Science license soon. This is a good in demand field providing you work in a good state (the field isn't regulated everywhere). Nursing is still a great paying rewarding career as well and should be looked into seriously

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njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey

31 months ago

Moises Kline in Los Angeles said: Also you can sit for MT after one year of lab experience. Please check with your state.

I think that typically applies to mostly people with MLTs & bio degrees. Most pathology labs won't hire a random biology major without any clinical lab experience to get the 1 year of experience in the first place. Some states like CA also flat out require a BSMT w' one year of clinical rotation and won't allow a license without it. Not to mention the more restrictive states are the ones that pay well, and the one's that don't have any regulations typically pay crap. I've heard labcorp/quest offer limited licenses and allow you to rotate in only one department and get a limited license but the problem is people often find themselves stuck in one dept. at labcorp/quest then, making less money than the would be in the hospitals. And hospitals are much less willing to hire someone that can't rotate throughout all the departments. Unfortunately, the best option here is to sign up for an accelerated 1 yr program after your bio degree and then get certified. Then you can work wherever you want.

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Robinrobin in Savannah, Georgia

31 months ago

Well, here's my story. I graduated w my BS in biology 8 years ago. My original intent was to go prevet tract and then off to vet school. Unfortunately, my school discontinued the prevet program after my fresh year but we would still be allowed to take those classes. (Btw the classes were no longer offered by the time I was classified high enough to take them). Anyway with the bleak employment outlook my senior year, I got a waitress job and a volunteer position at the local SPCA shelter. Both of which I kept for about 2 years after graduation until I moved to a bigger city. (After spending 4.5 years in school, I was not in the mind frame for more.) I managed to find a job in a vet clinic. They did hire me as a vet assistant instead of kennel because of my BS and experience. (Yay, foot in the door. ) So, I've been doing that for the past 5 years at two different clinics with n o real advancement. I love it and all but to do everything I am capable of, I need to be a licensed veterinary technician ( like a nurse. ) And licensing requirements are different from state to state but most require an associates degree in vet technology. My BS doesn't cover that, so I'm now in that process. Oh well, it's just the next step toward bigger and better things.
At least those people who told me I was over qualified were impressed by my resume. Lol Success is a winding road. Good luck all.

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BSinBio in Nashville, Tennessee

30 months ago

bioman said: wel i guess u guys mite as wel just work at macdonalds. it's great to hear that ur counselor was such a big help at my college there's only one counselor now due to all the budget cuts, and she's to busy with an overload of paperwork that she only has time for one appt a day. im 113 on the waitlist and hope to see her in 2018. wel my advice for u pansies is to stop visiting depressing forums like this and look for a job even if it's voluteer work or go bak to skool. i had a 3.8 gpa with a degree in biology and now im my 3rd year of medical skool. yes definately the medical feild is a sure bet for u guys. or look for a job within ur local county, geared twoards environmental regulation. k hopefully one day everybody in this forum can meet up and have a big party once everybody finds a job.

I don't want to appear mean or anything, but your spelling is atrocious and I am amazed that you are in your third year of medical school. Forgive me for doubting your credibility in this forum.

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Cody17 in Englewood, Florida

30 months ago

What exactly is a CRO

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njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey

30 months ago

Cody17 in Englewood, Florida said: What exactly is a CRO

Contract research organization. Lots of big companies outsource their research work to these organizations rather than build in-house extensive R&D laboratories for specific research. They can provide some decent money, but often don't provide long-term stable employment as the work is by definition cyclical and temporary in nature.

lots of employers are now hiring their science staff at the BS/MS level as temps for crappy pay with no benefits because they know their production/basic research work is temporary and cyclical in nature. The bottom line wins out, but unfortunately scientists are getting screwed.

Its sad to say, but from a purely financial standpoint a schoolteacher often does much much better financially than someone with a BS/MS in biology/chemistry. PhDs are a gamble; some people get stuck post-docing till they're 45, others graduate with a skill that's in-demand from industry immediately. However layoffs are still common and getting rehired after working in a specific niche for years can be tough to say at the least.

One little word of advise. If you live research go for the MD if you can. MDs can get into research but their unique skillset allows them much better job stability, and better access to patient samples often needed to conduct the research anyway.

Also look into accelearted BSN, optometry, PharmD, Dentistry, Medical Technologist, occupational therapy, physical therapy, cardiac rehab and other health related professions if your goal is stable employment.

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njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey

30 months ago

If one aspires to graduate school see if you can get into bioinformatics/biomedical engineering. These degrees offer transferrable skills to a variety of information and the are fewer graduates in these disciplines that in generic microbiology etc, so it'll mean you're getting higher salary offers and have an easier time getting a job when you hit the market.

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John in Lancaster, Pennsylvania

30 months ago

bioman said: wel i guess u guys mite as wel just work at macdonalds. it's great to hear that ur counselor was such a big help at my college there's only one counselor now due to all the budget cuts, and she's to busy with an overload of paperwork that she only has time for one appt a day. im 113 on the waitlist and hope to see her in 2018. wel my advice for u pansies is to stop visiting depressing forums like this and look for a job even if it's voluteer work or go bak to skool. i had a 3.8 gpa with a degree in biology and now im my 3rd year of medical skool. yes definately the medical feild is a sure bet for u guys. or look for a job within ur local county, geared twoards environmental regulation. k hopefully one day everybody in this forum can meet up and have a big party once everybody finds a job.

With spelling that's like yours, I pray to god that you're a troll and not actually enrolled in Medical School.

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FlyGuide none in Minn, Minnesota

30 months ago

your a troll, and a liar. what are you doing on this forum if you have a "Plan" good lord, I do hope you are not going to be a Dr. BTW who the hell wants to use a a third of ones take home on malpractice ins, another third on repayment of student loans, have fun Dr. Internet Troll!

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njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey

30 months ago

FlyGuide none in Minn, Minnesota said: your a troll, and a liar. what are you doing on this forum if you have a "Plan" good lord, I do hope you are not going to be a Dr. BTW who the hell wants to use a a third of ones take home on malpractice ins, another third on repayment of student loans, have fun Dr. Internet Troll!

Even after malpractice and loan payments, most doctors still do very well. Most specialists (and ~63% of American MD grads go into specialties, this is very common) make over 200k a year even after malpractice. Even after loan/malpractice costs they're still pulling in at least 75k annually in the beginning. Once their loans are paid off and they get some experience they'll have no problem making over 200k a year. How many other professionals make that kind of money?

Advice for everyone on here, one can do research as an MD (usually clinically focused) and make way more money than a PhD. If you can go to Medical school...

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fatafiori in Saratoga, California

30 months ago

moog in Santa Ana, California said: Alright Indeed peeps, I've enjoyed this thread so far and now I'll contribute with my story:

I graduated with a BS in Biology last year and I just recently got a job in a private biopharm company. I had a phase of doom and gloom right after graduation since I couldn't find jobs in biology with my degree. But, I knew realistically, I lacked more indepth skills I would need for a full-time position. To amend this, I took a non-paid internship for a few months after I graduated to really get my feet planted on what I wanted to do. It didn't hurt that I learned skills that would make me valuable to prospective employers. It was a great investment ; without it I wouldn't have been considered for jobs in my field of interest.

You can do things with a BS in Biology if you know what drives you and motivates you about the field- just don't expect a job to land in your lap because you took X, Y, and Z classes. Make strong connections with professors and supervisors since they will be the ones talking with prospective employers about your personality and performance. Be willing to make some sacrifices now to set you up for better opportunities. I did work for free while taking up numerous side jobs on weekends and evenings. No one said finding a job you really enjoy would be easy...

p.s. I've been told cell/mol bio trained people are a dime a dozen. Get trained on more niche techniques based on what industry you want to work in.

Anyways hopefully that helped someone out there in cyberspace :)

I find your story inspiring. I'm transferring to sfsu this fall for BS Microbiology. I wanted to go into physical therapy (Doctorate) which would be a 3 yr program after my bachelors, unfortunately I'm 24 and would like to work as soon as I obtain my degree (I don't want to wait til' I'm 29!).

I'm a charismatic, and understand that it's good to make those connections to find a job. Any advice?

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riot in Newburyport, Massachusetts

30 months ago

fatafiori in Saratoga, California said: I find your story inspiring. I'm transferring to sfsu this fall for BS Microbiology. I wanted to go into physical therapy (Doctorate) which would be a 3 yr program after my bachelors, unfortunately I'm 24 and would like to work as soon as I obtain my degree (I don't want to wait til' I'm 29!).

I'm a charismatic, and understand that it's good to make those connections to find a job. Any advice?

I guess I'll break my advice into a few sections:

First, if you think that physical therapy is your ideal career (and you think there will be jobs available five years from now), don't let age stop you. I just finished a BS in Biology at 26 and am starting graduate school this fall (PhD). While I'll finish school in my early 30s, I'm not worried about the delay in "real" income, as science isn't very physically demanding and I should still be able to work for at least 40 years should I need/want to. I would think that Physical Therapy should have similar working longevity. (You can have PT Aides lift patients if need be, right?)

Second, connections start at school. Ask intelligent questions in class and during office hours. Get to know your professors. Try to get involved with undergraduate research, even if it's not directly related to your interests. If your school hosts outside lecturers, make sure you attend these events and chat with the speaker after. Stop by your school's version of "Career Services." See if they can hook you up with an alumni mentor. Seek out an internship. For health professions, volunteer and/or shadow. I haven't actually looked for a full-time position in science yet, but my experience in landing undergraduate research experiences, an internship, and admission to graduate school has led me to believe that some of the most important traits you can exhibit in these kind of searches are appearing competent, intelligent, and interested.

(Continued.)

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riot in Newburyport, Massachusetts

30 months ago

(Continued from above.)

Third, if you decide to stick with science over health, make sure you plan for at least a Master's Degree at some point in the future. Many companies in Biotech/Pharma offer generous educational reimbursement, so don't feel as if you need to do this right away. The reason I say this is because most of the alumni from my college that I've met from my school with only a BS have Quality Control/Production jobs and few actually get to do science. Also, everyone I'm working with at my internship has a MS or a PhD. If you just want a "sciency" job, a BS is probably fine, but from what I've seen, the closer you want to be to the science, the more degrees you need.

Good Luck!

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gloria in Cagayan De Oro, Philippines

30 months ago

Lynn in Melbourne, Florida said: Biology is such a large field. People in my class ended up in all kinds of industry ( environmental , medical laboratories, pharmaceutical, universities lab , chemical companies, clinical research ). But most go for graduate schools to get more specialized education .
I worked for a CRO after finishing college but the pay is not that great. But once you get experience, you can go to pharmaceutical companies that pay more. Three technicians in my group got a job at Abbott after they did a year or two at a CRO. If you can relocate, check out these big CROs (Covance, Charles River). For entry level they will train you in one of the field - toxicology (small animal , large animal, acute, reproductive, etc), clinical chemistry ,necropsy,etc..
I am not a couselor, just sharing my experience. Hopefully, others will do the same. Good luck!

hi!
i would like to ask you,what are those possible jobs i may enter after i graduated college as a bs- bio student?

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gloria simogan in Cagayan De Oro, Philippines

30 months ago

can you please answer me directly?
thank you...
:}

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Nathalie in Chicago, Illinois

30 months ago

Bio Major in Norristown, Pennsylvania said: Hello, I had a 2.8 GPA in Biology Major, basic slacker, with some minimal lab experience. The big thing I've noticed is that people graduate and expect a job in their town. This is a global marketplace. There are pockets of pharma areas and other biotech sectors. I basically searched GLOBALLY and found a position in Virgina for 2 years followed by 2 years in a Hong Kong bio tech firm. I've now returned to the US and have TONS of offers and opportunities.

Those who expect a job down the street, will get what people get when they date down the street.

hheelppp meee

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Trevor in Tallahassee, Florida

30 months ago

I'm currently in my 5th year as an undergrad and I don't even remember why I went into Biology anymore. I figured I would just get the degree and find some decent-paying job in the lines of molecular biology/genetics, but now I'm beginning to realize after graduation I'm gonna be homeless due to the job market for a BA in Biology.

I'm thinking of switching to another major like Computer Science since computers have always been a passion of mine before I officially graduate so my federal loans don't get cut off, but I'm worried I'll hit the loan cap before I could graduate and then I'd be even more screwed. At the moment I have a whopping $900 in the bank so I'm on a pretty strict budget. Anyone know what I should do here? I'm about to have a panic attack.

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Sasha in Vancouver, British Columbia

30 months ago

Does your computer science program have a co-op program? I have a friend who did this and now makes good money as a programmer. I'm not sure what the situation is in the states though, or how typical my friends experience is. But I was always under the impression that a computer science degree is a good, practical degree to have.

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Trevor in Tallahassee, Florida

29 months ago

Well, I think going straight into CS would probably be impossible at this point. What I'm looking at now is trying to get into the Computational Biology degree since it would utilize my bio background and while giving me marketable CS skills. Then again, having a BA in Biology and Computational Biology seems pretty redundant. I'm not sure what to do here really. It sucks when your procrastination finally catches up to you.

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njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey

29 months ago

Trevor in Tallahassee, Florida said: Well, I think going straight into CS would probably be impossible at this point. What I'm looking at now is trying to get into the Computational Biology degree since it would utilize my bio background and while giving me marketable CS skills. Then again, having a BA in Biology and Computational Biology seems pretty redundant. I'm not sure what to do here really. It sucks when your procrastination finally catches up to you.

I'd personally try to get into a compuational biology/bioinformatics masters program immediately then, as your bio degree probably isn't worth more than toilet paper. Get some internships if you can while in the program then you should be able to hopefully find use for your programming skills, whether it be in biotech or not.

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Trevor in Tallahassee, Florida

29 months ago

njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey said: I'd personally try to get into a compuational biology/bioinformatics masters program immediately then, as your bio degree probably isn't worth more than toilet paper. Get some internships if you can while in the program then you should be able to hopefully find use for your programming skills, whether it be in biotech or not.

Unfortunately, I don't have any prior programming skills aside from random electives like Interdisciplinary Web Design. After looking around I don't think there would many if any masters degree programs for a CS-heavy field like bioinformatics that would take me in with just a biology BA. I figure a BA in comp bio or at least some CS classes from the degree would give me a leg up for grad school so I would have a vague background knowledge for the programming courses. Then again, I have no idea how I'd pay for that with my loans nearly exhausted.

How much would it cost to rent a gun and buy a bullet?

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njbiodude in Raritan, New Jersey

29 months ago

Trevor in Tallahassee, Florida said: I figure a BA in comp bio or at least some CS classes from the degree would give me a leg up for grad school so I would have a vague background knowledge for the programming courses. Then again, I have no idea how I'd pay for that with my loans nearly exhausted.

How much would it cost to rent a gun and buy a bullet?

Stop it and shut up, suicide isn't funny. Lots of Masters programs including one near my home take BS Bio grads for bioinformatics you just have to take a couple of programming courses beforehand. If you can maybe take intro to programming and calc II however, I think they'll make you take these if you don't have them. Also, do well and study for the GREs however, and try to get 700+ on the quant section if you can (not really that hard actually). Go instate of course, and try to look for masters programs that offer some sort of internship co-op prgram. And there are always private loans. If you're totally desperate look into the military as well they offer a 65k tuition repayment for the army and you can then later comission into the officer corp thanks to your "useles degree. Hope all works out.

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Q in West Palm Beach, Florida

29 months ago

Im fixing to enter my senior year of high school, and Im currently thinking of pursuing a wild biologist career. I was thinking of majoring in biology with a minor in some other science, like geology or something, or maybe double major. I found this website that discusses many different science careers if anyone in interested in other paths --- www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/science-engineering-careers/Zoo_zoologistsandwildlifebiologists_c001.shtml#education

My dream is to move out of suburban Florida and to some rural, mountanous state like Tennessee and work as a wildlife biologist. Its just that reading many of the previous posts has me slightly doubtful on how realistic my dreams are, mainly because biology degrees sometimes mean nothing. Any advice?

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sujata.parajuli in Blue Bell, Pennsylvania

29 months ago

I am planning to have a bachelor degree in biology .My focus is in the medical field ...can someone suggest me how is it?

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randomgirl in Sherbrooke, Quebec

29 months ago

JaneWay in Elk Grove, Illinois said: I feel like like such an idiot right now. I have a BS in Biology . After I graduated, I followed a totally different path.
I know a friend of mine has a friend who also got her BS in biology and works in some company shaving pigs and working with animals, she feels like her BS in Bio was not needed.
I mean what job can I get now, right away with a bio degree? I don't have experience in research or some direct bio field. I wanted something that would be a good career path with potential to grow.
Now, I'm trying to finish an MLT program. I should have tried entering an MT program at least, but I chose the MLT program for various reasons, despite the good advice I got here on these forums. Everywhere I search, they want MTs not MLTs. I'm going to be an oddball, an MLT with a BS in Biology.
I feel like I screwed up and it's just getting worse and that most of my decisions just get worse because of desperation. I feel like schools are just there to take money.

Well, if it makes you feel any better, I have a bachelor in Art History which I very much regret doing, because it was totally useless, and I'm not interested in working in the arts anymore at all. I've recently become interested in the medical field. So at 27, I did my Masters in Library and Information Studies. I just completed my degree two months ago, and now I'm looking for a job as a medical librarian. I'm actually regretting that I didn't do my bachelor in a science related field, such as biology. So, maybe library studies could be an option? It's a techi field, and its a non-thesis program. If you decide to do it, make sure its accredited by the American Library Associate (ALA). I hopethis helps!

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Bluetea in Texas

29 months ago

randomgirl in Sherbrooke, Quebec said: Well, if it makes you feel any better, I have a bachelor in Art History which I very much regret doing, because it was totally useless, and I'm not interested in working in the arts anymore at all. I've recently become interested in the medical field. So at 27, I did my Masters in Library and Information Studies. I just completed my degree two months ago, and now I'm looking for a job as a medical librarian.

Art History? What were you thinking? LOL!

The office manager at my doctor's has a degree in Art History and she went back to school as well.

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Andrea in Mission, Texas

29 months ago

well I got my bachelor bio degree , but only because I want to become a dermatologist in huston tx and it was a requirement . Usually most people that got a bio degree in my class wanted to further their education with something that required bio studies. I choce dermatolog (doctor of skin care) wich is very rewarding 200k a year.

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Fall '10 bio grad in San Diego, California

29 months ago

Hi "Blaze in San Diego,"

I'm on page 6 of this "depressing" thread (trying to read 2 pages a day), and I feel like we have a lot in common (despite me being 6-7 years younger than you) such as:

-I'm seriously considering joining the military (talking to a recruiter right now about Navy OCS)
-I've also dropped a couple hundred for a CA REHS trainee license (which I felt was a waste because there really aren't any opportunities out there)
-I volunteer for the Coast Guard Auxiliary and am also considering applying for that branch as well

Despite San Diego (I'm a native btw) being a "hot-spot" for biotech, I feel like the job opportunities are filling up fast because we are competing with the incoming 2012 science graduates who are more "fresh."

Worse comes to worst I think I'll just enlist (despite having a college degree, although I hear it is becoming more common these days...) and become a "lifer."
My dad (and family in general) feel like I'm "wasting" my degree if I decide to enlist (he is a retired enlistee himself). Well, I'm already exhausting my attempts at applying for officer-ship, and at this point I'll do anything to join the military. As time passes by, I'm developing a more "realistic" mindset where money doesn't really matter (well I mean just enough to pay the bills). I want to become more independent and start living my life already (I'm 25 right now and not getting any younger).

Anyways Blaze, I'm not sure if you still check in on this thread, but if you do I'd really like to contact you via email to discuss some things and hopefully you can share more insight since you've already experienced the things that I have already experienced (or considering to experience). Anyways, thanks for your insights.

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Blaze in Carlsbad, California

29 months ago

Fall '10 bio grad:

I still get these email updates from this thread, so feel free to contact me about your decisions.

If you're really interested in the rehs, keep applying and spread out a bit. I work in Riverside County and we still hire people on a pretty regular basis. There are only a few counties that regularly accept trainees and obviously it's the counties where no one wants to live. Those are places to get started, however. Even here though, hundreds apply, dozens interview, and only a few are hired.

As for the military, forget what your family says about wasting your degree by enlisting. These days, that degree might be the only thing that gets you in. Your affiliation with the Coast Guard probably helps a lot, too. It is extremely hard to get into OCS and even enlisting these days. What older people don't often understand is that in our generation everyone has a degree and in this economy, everyone tries to be an officer in the military for stability. Further complicating things is that even enlisting pays at or better than most comparable professional jobs in the private sector after a few years. So even enlisting is extremely competitive in this market.

Also, there are very few careers with any kind of pension, so either military or rehs is going to be very competitive just for the meager (in the case of the military) pension.

I separated from the Navy after nine years, so obviously I would encourage you to get in as an rehs over the military. But take what you can get.

Also, there has recently been a drastic pension cut this past year for new rehs hires in our county, so don't expect a hell of a lot from that career path either. But the job is just as stable as military and even the slashed pension is more money than your military pension. Also, the rehs job is far more autonomous and rewarding than most in the military (that's been my experience anyway).

aaron.m.williams@hotmail.com

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Blaze in Carlsbad, California

29 months ago

Maybe this is obvious, but consider:

Military officers are much like health inspectors (REHS) in that their knowledge and experience is a mile wide and an inch deep...

where military enlisted are much like science technicians in that their knowledge and experience is often an inch wide and a mile deep.

Figuring out whether you are a generalist or a specialist by nature could help you avoid a winding path down the road of life and a lot of misused time.

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Growler in Minneapolis, Minnesota

29 months ago

I would tell to stay away from B.S in Biology if you want to make good money unless you can get into professional school afterwards. Going to graduate school and then pos-doctoral work and trying to get into biotech/pharma might all depends in what you did during your tenure as a post-doc. If trying a faculty position it takes time and you might get lucky if you are a good writer who can get some grants.

In summary it all comes down to how much you like science. I like science and got the B.S and went to grad school and know involved in running a laboratory. It's always not about the money but I am starting to wonder if being passionate about something good enough or do I really need to start to take care of my family !!!!!!

Tough luck

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james in Centreville, Virginia

29 months ago

eren 090 in Alexandria, Virginia said: i plan to have bachelor degree in biology in according to become a dentist .would bachelor degree in bio have any oportunuties until i get my graduate diploma.

yes any hard science should work into dentistry. or pre-med programs. GPA needs to be high. 3.5+ look at the schools websites for requirements.

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Melanie in Boomer, North Carolina

29 months ago

bass in Boston, Massachusetts said: Biology jobs exist in teaching

And so the cycle continues, lol.

(-a biology grad)

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Timmy in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

29 months ago

Melanie in Boomer, North Carolina said: And so the cycle continues, lol.

(-a biology grad)

So that's where all of the jobs are. Who said employers in the US aren't investing in college grads with no experience to train them. Teaching students to teach students to teach students to teach until we become the Society of the Academic Union. It all makes sense now!

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njbiodude in Bedminster, New Jersey

29 months ago

Timmy in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina said: So that's where all of the jobs are. Who said employers in the US aren't investing in college grads with no experience to train them. Teaching students to teach students to teach students to teach until we become the Society of the Academic Union. It all makes sense now!

This just made me crack up!

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Wow in Lake Saint Louis, Missouri

29 months ago

I graduated with my BS in Biology 6 years ago, and I didn't find it that difficult to find a temp job, which eventually became a permanent job that paid very well (started at $30/hr). A lot of the big biotech/pharma companies these days go through temp agencies to fill open positions and then cherry pick the most competent workers from the temp employees.

You will have to spend 6-12 months as a temp worker making $15-20/hr, but as long as you are not a complete idiot or super lazy, you might get hired full-time. And if you don't get hired, at least you gained some experience to put on a resume.

Considering today's biotech/pharma world, I would gladly tell anyone going to college for science to focus on biochemistry or molecular biology instead of chemistry. At my work, the applicants with chemistry degrees don't even get interviewed. The pharma industry is moving very rapidly away from small molecule/chemistry to biologics and vaccines.

The major downside to anyone wanting to get a well-paying research job is there are certain hubs where you need to live to find a job. There are some smaller sites and CROs scattered across the Midwest, Northwest, and North Carolina, but the majority of biotech/pharma jobs are very concentrated in the Northeast and California. Just something to consider when looking...

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Nicholas in Astoria, New York

29 months ago

So, does anyone have anymore solid advice for those looking to go into field biology (starting as a low-paying Biological Science Technician)? Most advice on here seems to be geared towards biotech/pharma. With my senior year about to begin in a month, I am starting to get the sweats about the job hunt that is right around the corner. My relevant experience thus far only consists of my current internship for my city government surveying trees for a longevity study. I have taken advantage of volunteer work within the internship (such as shoreline cleanup, "green roof" painting, etc. [plan on doing invasive weed removal as well]), just to have tiny things to add to my resume. I understand that competition will be fierce, and that is why I am quite frightened. I have noticed that GIS seems to be a very important component in the biology field, so I am looking to take a course in that before I graduate as well.

Any advice on the matter is greatly appreciated. Thanks.

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struggling in Brooklyn, New York

29 months ago

Wow in Lake Saint Louis, Missouri said: I graduated with my BS in Biology 6 years ago, and I didn't find it that difficult to find a temp job, which eventually became a permanent job that paid very well (started at $30/hr). A lot of the big biotech/pharma companies these days go through temp agencies to fill open positions and then cherry pick the most competent workers from the temp employees.

You will have to spend 6-12 months as a temp worker making $15-20/hr, but as long as you are not a complete idiot or super lazy, you might get hired full-time. And if you don't get hired, at least you gained some experience to put on a resume.

Considering today's biotech/pharma world, I would gladly tell anyone going to college for science to focus on biochemistry or molecular biology instead of chemistry. At my work, the applicants with chemistry degrees don't even get interviewed. The pharma industry is moving very rapidly away from small molecule/chemistry to biologics and vaccines.

The major downside to anyone wanting to get a well-paying research job is there are certain hubs where you need to live to find a job. There are some smaller sites and CROs scattered across the Midwest, Northwest, and North Carolina, but the majority of biotech/pharma jobs are very concentrated in the Northeast and California. Just something to consider when looking...

hello I currently live in New York City, and I have a bachelors in biology and I just graduated, are there any temp agencies you would recommend please.

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GetOutofYourComfortZone in Edmond, Oklahoma

29 months ago

Like another post I just read on this forum, I'd like to say to search globally for jobs. You can't just sit in your hometown and expect some sort of miracle high paying job to come around. Most of those individuals that are holding those positions probably did a ton of traveling themselves and have an incredible resume that will blow any new grad out of the water. You're starting at the bottom of a ladder, work hard, take jobs you may not necessarily enjoy and climb your way to the top of the career ladder.

Cheers

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njbiodude in Bedminster, New Jersey

29 months ago

GetOutofYourComfortZone in Edmond, Oklahoma said: Like another post I just read on this forum, I'd like to say to search globally for jobs. You can't just sit in your hometown and expect some sort of miracle high paying job to come around.Cheers

In certain healthcare fields people have no problem getting jobs in their home state. Here is the problem I have with a lot of biotech/pharma R&D work--overspecialization. I've known world class scientists with decades of experience in fortune 500 R&D with patents that had extreme trouble finding work after layoffs and had to move thousands of miles away to get another job. That's extremely hard on their families. Not only is it hired to crack into the field, it's hard to get back in when layoffs occur--and they occur frequently as the nature of research makes the jobs unstable (i.e. project not working, lay off the entire department). Someone that works on Lyme Disease vaccines for 10 years will likely have a problem getting into any job that isn't extremely related to their previous job. Many of these laid off people end up as high school teachers, some move into business or legal fields where their skills don't become obsolete.

This is why I encourage people to pursue medicine (in all forms not just MD) because the work is almost always in demand and much harder to outsource. Also as everyone knows the most successful bio-researchers by far (in terms of job stability and money) for the most part are clinical researchers with MD/DOs working on clinical trial work. This work cannot be outsourced to India as it must comply with FDA standards.

There are some excellent bachelors degrees like electrical engineering, chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, accounting, nursing, clinical laboratory science, and respiratory therapy that get you a defined and well paying job right out of school. Biology isn't want of them and you'll have to be creative and possibly leave the field or pursue medicine.

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WVDrifter in San Francisco, California

28 months ago

test 123

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WVDrifter in San Francisco, California

28 months ago

Great degree but a hard road ahead if your looking for the American Dream.
my story:
1991 B.S. Biology USC-coastal Carolina - recession, war, no jobs, 80 resumes out there.
1992 - shoveling coal in WV 6.25/HR coal analyst. ripped muscle in neckt
1992 washing dishes in back of steakhouse 3mo Shallotte,NC
1992 Rhone Polenc RTP,NC fungicides and pesticides - became sensitized and had to quit job. 10/hr
1993 water plant operator Brunswick Co, NC 1wk of school. all coworkers had severed time in jail for something. 2yrs on job 7.25/hr
1995 moved to Burlington,NC compact disc manufacturing 10/hr
apartment rent $250/ mo ( get the picture?)
saved enough money in 1yr to go back to schoo, moved to wknd shift.
Should I read more big thick books about little tiny molecules or
do I want to learn a skill and have a job when I graduate and no more college debt at $800/semester.
1996 I picked nuclear medicine technology Forsyth Tech Winston-Salem,NC 2yrs A.A.S. degree. school 5days a week, work Fri,Sat,Sun 32hrs

Graduated 1998 - only one job locally- part-time. I took it and kept old job. both pay 13/hr.
I decided to go back to school for 6mo and learn Magnetic Resonance Imaging. I dropped both jobs and got a 2nd shift job in DNA lab. LabCorp evening shift. school 5days/wk, work 5days/wk for 6mo. graduated 2001.
got registered in Nuclear Medicine 2001
signed up with allied health travel company
more.................... sorry

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WVDrifter in San Francisco, California

28 months ago

sent to Charlottesville,VA to work for one year before traveling.
picked up more experience in Charlotte,NC Nashville,TN and Kitty Hawk NC. now im ready to travel the USA.
First job Mississippi 33/hr, 600/mo car allowance, 30/day meals tax free, 50/mo cell phone, housing and utilities all paid. trip to and from job paid.
I made over 86K in 1yr.

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WVDrifter in San Francisco, California

28 months ago

more jobs in Port Huron,MI 2006, Boston,MA 2007
08 market crashed - was hired perm in Boston.
10 market slowing - job cut to PT. back to travel 2012
now in beach condo Aptos,CA watching whales play from the deck.

I have had over 40 employers in my life and moved about 40 times chasing the American dream.
All I wanted was a small home on a farm in WV, not after money.
I think something is wrong with life. I now have a job but I can't return home because there are no jobs where I want to live.
I don't really want to go back to school but Im almost to old to start a family.
I never know where or when or how long the next job will last.
It kind of makes it hard to meet or settle down.
If you find a job that makes you happy or someone that makes you happy don't overlook it.
don't beat yourself up, the economy is bad, automation put lots of people out of work,
be glad that you got to learn about how the world you live in works. I am still glad that I majored in biology.
find your treasures in your friends and family.
good luck to all of you!
I may have to call Dr Phil and ask him how to put the brakes on my life. LOL!

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Sasha in Vancouver, British Columbia

28 months ago

m in Edmonton, Alberta said: I was also going to say, and I know this won't apply to 99% of you, but if you are willing to make a move, there is a lot of environmental work in Western Canada. Just due to the oil & gas alone, you'll find a ton of companies and yes, a lot are hiring entry level . I had 5 job offers in one month, and had another company call me 2 weeks ago with a job and no, I didn't have a ton of experience. I actually spent years doing admin work overseas so there you go! And non-Canadian residents are hired - my workplace is like a mini UN!

I have no idea what the US is like for enviro work, though I would assume there should be quite a bit out East with all the industry. Hang in there, I know how grim things can seem, but dammit, you're biology grads which means you're resourceful as hell!! :D

Hey, I'm interested in doing this sort of work. Would you mind if I contacted you to get some tips on how to break into this? My degree is from 1999. Do you think that is too long ago?

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WVDrifter in San Francisco, California

28 months ago

Find a radiologic technologist program.
you will need a two year degree in X-Ray or Nuclear Medicine in order to get into MRI. Stay away from the programs that are not ARRT.
You don't need a B.S. in biology but it will be helpful in understanding the science. Community colleges will be happy to have you enroll.
you must pass certain health tests, get vaccines and background checks. Its not easy but its very interesting and the best thing I ever did to pull myself up out of the mud.

two year tech degrees pay more than a B.S. degree and you actually know how to do something when you graduate and are ready to go to work. You have to like people and want to help them. don't go into healthcare just for the money. This just causes the quality of healthcare to decline and that is noticed in some places I have worked.
The first question I asked myself when I graduated with my biology degree was " what is it that I can actually do?" I could not answer that question.

radiology hit its peak a few years back. nuclear medicine techs are now having trouble finding jobs. Cat Scan and Ultrasound seem to be doing the best. MRI has slowed a little but the baby boomers are retiring so future is still bright for now but lots of people are going back to school.

If I had it to do again I would do electrical or mechanical engineering.

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Jeff in Denver, Colorado

28 months ago

What can you do with a biology degree? Teach Republican congressmen how babies are made.

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