Bachelors degree in Biology, what can you do with it?

Get new comments by email
You can cancel email alerts at anytime.
Comments (601 to 650 of 711)
Page:  « First « Previous   10  11  12  13  14  15  Next »   Last »

elaine in Quezon City, Philippines

16 months ago

Im about to start college this coming June 2013. I was supposed to be an accountancy student but my parents forced me to shift and take Bs biology instead. Ive always like this course ever since I was a kid and when I graduated high school I started my research about bs bio and it turns out if I graduate in this course theres only a slim chance to get a job. Now I dont know what to do anymore and im not even sure if im going to pursue medicine after I gtaduate this course. Do you think I should go back to BS accountancy at 2nd sem? I need help.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

njbiodude in New Jersey

16 months ago

elaine in Quezon City, Philippines said: Im about to start college this coming June 2013. I was supposed to be an accountancy student but my parents forced me to shift and take Bs biology instead. Ive always like this course ever since I was a kid and when I graduated high school I started my research about bs bio and it turns out if I graduate in this course theres only a slim chance to get a job. Now I dont know what to do anymore and im not even sure if im going to pursue medicine after I gtaduate this course. Do you think I should go back to BS accountancy at 2nd sem? I need help.

DO NOT NOT NOT do a BS in biology. Accounting degrees are wonderful. I'd tell your parents you'll apply to med school (if that'll make them happy), and take accounting as a bs (great major btw, my friend who did a BS in accounting got a great job within several mos. out of school). Instead tell your adviser you want to apply for medical school and take the prerequisites. They are a year of general chemistry, a year of organic chemistry, a year of physics, math through calculus (might overlap with accounting degree), and a year of biology. That way in the very likely event med school doesn't work out (less than half of applicants accepted), you have a degree that will both get you a job, and all/most the prerequisites done for most health professional degrees (i.e. dentistry, pharmacy, optometry et. al) if you do choose to go that route.

Good luck.

I learned the hard way.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

mee in Elizabeth, New Jersey

16 months ago

I agree with njbiodude...Its not beneficial doing Biology at all.. unless you doing to Medical school right after...I am not going to medical school So it was hard to me to find a job in biology field...i had a rough time because it didnt have any internship and any industrial experience. It really bad economy to find a job without experience its reallly hard.. But Medical field really growing up and you will find something in this field..its depend on you if you are willing to put affect going to medical field. i hope this will help you
GoodLuck...:)

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Riot in Ware, Massachusetts

16 months ago

Elaine in Quezon City, please note that the advice most of us, including njbiodude and mee in NJ, are giving is with respect to the job market for Biology majors in the US; things could be different in your country.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

mee in Elizabeth, New Jersey

16 months ago

Riot in Ware, Massachusetts said: Elaine in Quezon City, please note that the advice most of us, including njbiodude and mee in NJ, are giving is with respect to the job market for Biology majors in the US; things could be different in your country.

Yes..it depends on everyone experience, i had bad experience that doesn't mean everyone else will have it too. Yea i am saying this because of job market..

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

iamlewis in Chattanooga, Tennessee

15 months ago

Lake swimmer in Brick, New Jersey said: Everyone here is not understanding that one should only get a B.S. in Biology and/or chemistry to go on to medical school and be some sort of doctor. or pursue a graduate degree and do research. of course you cant do anything with a bachelors in bio. these days you cant do much with a bachelors in general . mostly all the above average paying jobs requires ATLEAST a master degree.

so go back to school.

There are plenty of things you can do with a bachelors degree, but they all require extra schooling, especially if you haven't planned ahead and gotten the experience you need for them in undergrad. The main thing these days is experience and a degree. Go ahead and conduct actual job searches in several biological career choices. They'll tell you exactly what you need. Ex: a bachelor's degree and 1 year of work related experience OR 5 years of work related experience OR some college and three years work related experience. Sitting around and asking other people how to get a job in your field shows that your eager to listen and learn, but you have to get out there yourself and get some hands on experience.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

me2 in Somerville, New Jersey

15 months ago

Hello...Yes i agree with your comment Lewis......If people don't have experience but degree its really hard to find a job...unless you have some connections where people can get you in. And Off course go back to school for Masters. But i had hard time finding job because i didn't have experience, i hardly could get interviews. but, now i found one because i knew someone in this company...If someone is willing to help you to get in that will be best...Otherwise Goodluck!!!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Riot in Massachusetts

15 months ago

Do most schools not stress the importance of undergraduate research and/or internships or are these opportunities just not accessible? My undergrad school placed a lot of emphasis in this area, so it just seems weird to me that many of the posters here don't have these experiences in their background. (I know that in certain circumstances research and internships come unpaid, which can cause difficulties.)

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Ron Burgen in NY, New York

15 months ago

Riot in Massachusetts said: Do most schools not stress the importance of undergraduate research and/or internships or are these opportunities just not accessible? My undergrad school placed a lot of emphasis in this area, so it just seems weird to me that many of the posters here don't have these experiences in their background. (I know that in certain circumstances research and internships come unpaid, which can cause difficulties.)

It amazes me that so little fail to realize this simple fact. It is imperative to gain experience while an undergrad, be it research or internship. The evidence is everywhere.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

njbiodude in New Jersey

15 months ago

Ron Burgen in NY, New York said: It amazes me that so little fail to realize this simple fact. It is imperative to gain experience while an undergrad, be it research or internship. The evidence is everywhere.

You sound like you're still a naive student spouting back the nonsense your college is feeding you. I'd bet that most biology majors do do some academic research or an internship/volunteer work. I did all three. The problem is the jobs you get with a biology degree and research/internship experience still suck. The majority are academic laboratories which pay $10-15/hr with no benefits and have you doing b*tchwork for some sorry @ssed overworked PhD who spends more time writing grants than doing science. Some exist in production/QC in industry at the BS level but these are still too often contract positions for $15-20/hr with no benefits. Most masters degrees other than bioengineering/bioinformatics (which offer other non-biological skills) are useless as well. Some PhDs can get professorship offers but the majority do not. And industry is with rampant outsourcing, and ever decreasing venture capitalist funds (who realized sinking billions into cancer drugs that prolong lives by 2 miserable months isn't a sound investment, and the "genetic revolution" would never happen).

Again if you want to help the environment change your major ASAP to civil/environmental engineering. Work in the great outdoors extracting resources: geophysics. Work in a laboratory: CLS. Help patients: nursing. Make money: accounting/finance/software engineering. Don't follow the BS schools rave about "following your [aimless studying for obscure exams that provide no help for the real working work] dreams" so the university can bereave you of your money.

You do *not* need to be a biology major to attend medical school/dental school/podiatry school/pa school etc. In fact it's often a bad move to do so--these schools like diversity.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (9) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

Little-T in Reston, Virginia

15 months ago

12 months graduate, still no jobs, I have gotten interviews but always get stumped on the experience part, I have internship experience but its not in the lab.

I'm looking for biotech work and have a B.S. in biology

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Riot in Massachusetts

15 months ago

Little-T in Reston, Virginia said: 12 months graduate, still no jobs, I have gotten interviews but always get stumped on the experience part, I have internship experience but its not in the lab.

I'm looking for biotech work and have a B.S. in biology

You're probably already doing this, but it doesn't hurt to check; Are you applying to locations outside your immediate area? You're near DC, so I'm sure that there is a lot of activity around NIH, but what about other good life sciences areas on the East Coast? Research Triangle Park, NC? Metro Boston? It can be difficult to find a first job in something as specialized as biotech without being willing to relocate.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

BioTechAdvisor in Rancho Cucamonga, California

15 months ago

Little-T in Reston, Virginia said: 12 months graduate, still no jobs, I have gotten interviews but always get stumped on the experience part, I have internship experience but its not in the lab.

I'm looking for biotech work and have a B.S. in biology

Assuming that you WANT to work in a lab setting, then try temp agencies that specialize in biotech, pharma, life science companies. Convince the agency that you're careful, detail oriented, will listen, follow directions, etc. Getting into a temp pool will provide you with the experience you need. You may start with simple, repetitive jobs, but keep at it, and you will gain experience. Do a good job at what is asked of you, and you will be assigned more complex tasks and take on more challenging roles.

Not having a research project lab experience in college makes it very tough to get the first full-time lab job.

If you have internship experience, why not follow that path (or something related to it)?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Penny in Espanola, New Mexico

14 months ago

BioTechAdvisor in Rancho Cucamonga, California said: If you want to work in a laboratory setting, have you tried a temp agency that places lab workers into pharma and biotech companies?

Kelly Scientific and Lab Support only want people with experience. I signed up with both and used to call in every day like a total pest and then they finally admitted that to me. And that was back when the economy was GOOD.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No Reply - Report abuse

Ron Burgen in NY, New York

14 months ago

njbiodude in New Jersey said: You sound like you're still a naive student spouting back the nonsense your college is feeding you.

I have already graduated from college and have attained employment within the environmental field. I didn't mean to come off as arrogant or condescending, if that's the way you took it. I am fully aware of how crappy it is out there for biology majors, which is why I stated how people should take the fact that you need prior experience very seriously. To keep in line with what you said, it is important to tailor these internships to relevant experience in a somewhat lucrative field (i.e. environmental services) if one is serious about post-grad employment.

I think that following your dreams in the biology field is nothing but a pipe dream. I wanted to be a conservation biologist, but when I found out just how terrible the jobs were, and how little opportunity there was, I began to look deeper into what I was interested in and did undergraduate research and internships within that field. And yes, I am FULLY aware of how some people just get the **** end of the stick and can't find employment no matter what their experience. It happens and it's unfortunate, but my original post was merely pointing out how many students just seem to ignore advice of how important pre-grad experience is...it's almost a given at this point.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

Beth in Plano in Plano, Texas

14 months ago

What is the max pay a Biologist can make ?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Anon in Birmingham, Alabama

14 months ago

It depends on several factors-- what area of biology it is, whom you work for, etc.

Government jobs can pay a decent salary for those without graduate-level degrees, for example...but not all jobs will pay that much. I was looking at a (government/federal) wildlife biologist job that pays almost 60k/year in an area with a decent cost of living, but a non-government job here-- the same job, wouldn't pay that much. I was looking at a state job (for environmental) that pays only 33k per year. I know people with graduate degrees who earn six figures, but they didn't start off at that point.

It can really vary *greatly* depending on what degrees you have and what type of entity you work for.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Riot in Massachusetts

14 months ago

Beth in Plano in Plano, Texas said: What is the max pay a Biologist can make ?

Anon is right, it depends on many things, primarily how you define "biologist." An entry level lab technician with a Bachelor's Degree working in an academic setting might make under $30k/year, while a Director at a large biotech/pharmaceutical company might make over $250k/year. Setting matters. Someone with a PhD in Biology may make (starting out) $40k/year at a community college, $60k/year at a 4-year school, and $80-100k+ in industry.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Lio in Mount Pleasant, Michigan

14 months ago

I have a buddy who had a BS in Biology and he is a medical doctor now.After his Bachelors he went to Caribbians and studied for three years .Came back and wrote the state exam and made it.He is a pediatrician now.That's the route many guys are taking bc it's cheap

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Ron Burgen in NY, New York

14 months ago

Since I went to a city college, the salaries of my professors is public data. I'm not sure if this includes grant money, but they (biologists and organic chemists) are all making between $80,000-$160,000 a year.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Anonymous in Birmingham, Alabama

14 months ago

Ron Burgen in NY, New York said: Since I went to a city college, the salaries of my professors is public data. I'm not sure if this includes grant money, but they (biologists and organic chemists) are all making between $80,000-$160,000 a year.

It was a professor of mine (PhD, environmental science) that clued me in that he made six figures. It was a private university though. I figured scientists could make good money teaching at the university level, but I wasn't thinking six figures (before he told me that).

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Joe Blow in Middletown, New York

14 months ago

Ron Burgen in NY, New York said: Since I went to a city college, the salaries of my professors is public data. I'm not sure if this includes grant money, but they (biologists and organic chemists) are all making between $80,000-$160,000 a year.

NY public employees salary and pensions website

seethroughny.net

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Cstr in Garden Grove, California

14 months ago

I'm basically in the same situation as you when you graduated. I would love to hear more about how you ended up doing well and if there are any useful tips you could give me?

Thanks.

Bio Major in Norristown, Pennsylvania said: Hello, I had a 2.8 GPA in Biology Major, basic slacker, with some minimal lab experience. The big thing I've noticed is that people graduate and expect a job in their town. This is a global marketplace. There are pockets of pharma areas and other biotech sectors. I basically searched GLOBALLY and found a position in Virgina for 2 years followed by 2 years in a Hong Kong bio tech firm. I've now returned to the US and have TONS of offers and opportunities.

Those who expect a job down the street, will get what people get when they date down the street.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

GhostLady in Costa Mesa, California

14 months ago

There are many career options for people with a B.S. in Biology! ((Part 1))

With a B.S. in Biology and a Research Certificate you can land a job as a Biology Research Assistant at the College/University that you studied or a Research Center. (You will need to obtain an undergraduate Research Certificate. While you are obtaining your Research Certificate you might be able to get a job or an internship at the College/University that you are studying at. If there are no jobs or internships available, try to get an internship at Research Centers through your College/University. Also, you can volunteer.)

With a B.S. in Biology and a Teaching Certificate you can land a job as a Biology Teacher at a middle school or/and high school. Also, you can land a job as a Teaching Assistant at a College/University. (You will need to obtain a Teaching Certificate for NON EDUCATION MAJORS. You might even be able to start working as a Teaching Assistant at the College/University that you studied at before you have completed your Teaching Certificate. Volunteer or get an internship, at the College/University that you studied, while obtaining your Teaching Certificate.) (You can get a job as a Tutor at the College/University that you studied at while obtaining your Teaching Certificate. Also, you can get a job as a Tutor at a middle school or/and high school while obtaining your Teaching Certificate.) [You can obtain a temporary State Teaching Certificate that is good for 3 years or a Permanent State Teaching Certificate. After working for 3 years, you can obtain a National Teaching Certificate.] [You might have to work as a substitute teacher for about 1-3 year(s) before you land a full-time job.] *Make sure that the Teaching Certification program is accredited.*

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

GhostLady in Costa Mesa, California

14 months ago

There are many career options for people with a B.S. in Biology! ((Part 2))

With a B.S. in Biology and a Tutoring Certificate you can land a job as a Biology Tutor at a middle school or/and high school or/and College/University. (A Tutoring Certificate proves that you are a competent Tutor. You MIGHT have to freelance [craigslist.com, fivver.com. wyzant.com] before you can land a job at a middle school or/and high school or/and College/University.) [You will need to obtain a Tutoring Certificate for Broad Biology or/and Specific Biology [e.g. Physiology, Anatomy, Microbiology, Marine, etc]. [ visit this URL link for certification: www.ntatutor.com/ ] *National Tutoring Association is the ONLY association that has accredited Tutoring Certification.*

With a B.S. in Biology and a Writing Certificate you can land a job as a Biology Writer/Biology Blogger. (A Writing Certificate provides development in becoming a proficient writer. You can freelance [craigslist.com, fivver.com. or elance] or/and contribute to WiseGeek.com & Yahoo.com & Ehow.com [many more; google it] while you are obtaining your Writing Certificate.) [Make sure that the Writing program, that you choose to obtain a Writing Certificate through, is designed for various forms of non-fiction: criticism, review, commentary, science writing, writing about academic subjects, and writing about careers, book writing]. *Recommendation: Start a blog (don’t forget to monetize it)!*

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (2) Reply - Report abuse

GhostLady in Costa Mesa, California

14 months ago

There are many career options for people with a B.S. in Biology! ((Part 3))

With a B.S. in Biology and a Laboratory Certificate you can land a job as a Biology Laboratory Assistant at a College/University; you can land a job as a Biology Laboratory Assistant at a middle school or high school; you can land a job as a Biology Laboratory Assistant at a Laboratory Facility. (You will need to obtain an undergraduate Laboratory Certificate. While you are obtaining your Laboratory Certificate you might be able to get a job or an internship at the College/University that you are studying at. If there are no jobs or internships available, try to get an internship at a Laboratory Facility through your College/University. Also, you can volunteer.)

With a B.S. in Biology and a Digital Photography Certificate you can land a job as a Biology Photographer at numerous places. (By obtaining a Digital Photography Certificate you will develop the skills that you need to become a Biology Photograpger.) [Make sure that the Photography program, that you choose to obtain a Photography Certificate through, is designed to teach you how the camera works, photography techniques, photography editing, and light for photography.]

Many, many, many, more career options!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

GhostLady in Costa Mesa, California

14 months ago

njbiodude in New Jersey said: You sound like you're still a naive student spouting back the nonsense your college is feeding you. I'd bet that most biology majors do do some academic research or an internship/volunteer work. I did all three. The problem is the jobs you get with a biology degree and research/internship experience still suck. The majority are academic laboratories which pay $10-15/ hr with no benefits and have you doing b*tchwork for some sorry @ssed overworked PhD who spends more time writing grants than doing science. Some exist in production/QC in industry at the BS level but these are still too often contract positions for $15-20/hr with no benefits. Most masters degrees other than bioengineering/bioinformatics (which offer other non-biological skills) are useless as well.

Volunteer work, internship work, reach work, tutoring work and teaching work at Colleges/Universities is FOR STUDENTS to gain work experience and NOT to earn money; so, if you got paid as a student, it was a benefit! Getting paid $10-$20 per hour is decent for a person that ONLY has a Bachelors Degrees; even though you might have gotten paid about the same as a student. You are NOT a Biologist, hence, you shouldn't expect to get paid as much as one!

By the way, if you combine your B.S. in Biology with Photography or/and Writing or/and Tutoring you can make a good 6 figures a year!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (8) Reply - Report abuse

GhostLady in Costa Mesa, California

14 months ago

Fall '10 bio grad in San Diego, California said: I decided to forsake my bio degree...I'm "starting over" at community college right now in an EMT program. I don't know if I'm jaded or disillusioned at this point, but at 25 years old I'm desperate to start working and live my life. Good luck everyone, and I wish you all the best in whatever you do.

Read my posts that I posted today (7/13/2013), they might interest you! :-)

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (4) Reply - Report abuse

GhostLady in Costa Mesa, California

14 months ago

Tamara in Birmingham, Alabama said: It's probably just the fact that the field lacks enough jobs. I'm doing a master's in biology right now, but I'm staring over with a master's in clinical lab sciences in August. I just feel like pursuing rote biology isn't worth it anymore for me. Nothing is guaranteed, but your chances of landing a job are better with a CLS/medical technology degree, even if it's just an associates degree.

Read my posts that I posted today (7/13/2013), they might interest you! :-)

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (7) Reply - Report abuse

GhostLady in Costa Mesa, California

14 months ago

Fall '10 bio grad in San Diego, California said: The fact that this thread has been inactive for a couple weeks now made me wonder if all those previous posters got jobs by now (including Jane), lol. Unfortunately, I can't say the same for myself. I read all the pages of this thread a couple of weeks ago, and the useful information I came across were both insightful and/or depressing.

I feel disillusioned with biology at this point but would like to salvage it somehow. My friend is trying to connect me to a part-time job with an airline contractor (not related to biology at all). It is a split-shift though, so at least I would have that time window in the middle to take some community college classes and essentially "try again." I've been looking into the physical therapist assistant program. I know it may seem like taking a step backwards (since post-baccalaureate PT programs do exist), but I'm trying to be realistic here and don't want to accrue a pile of debt. I'm also looking at the MLT program at another community college but the waiting list seems backed up to Fall 2013 (can I last that long?)

Read my posts for today (7/13/2013), they might interest you! :-)

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (6) Reply - Report abuse

Riot in Massachusetts

14 months ago

"Research Certificate" and "Laboratory Certificate" aren't real things, at least not for Biology majors.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (5) / No Reply - Report abuse

njbiodude in New Jersey

14 months ago

Riot in Massachusetts said: "Research Certificate" and "Laboratory Certificate" aren't real things, at least not for Biology majors.

Agreed. Teaching certificate is the only one of those that were valid, the rest are bs. If by laboratory certificate you mean a 1 year + NAACLS accredited medical laboratory licensure program to work in a hospital, that's a different story. Research certificate is total nonsense, you get research jobs by having classes/relevant research experience, and the jobs are low paying. Also a "photography" certificate isn't real either.

Also the nonsense about $10-20/hr being good for someone with a bachelors degree, that's absurd. Ex. convict construction workers can make $20/hr.

This major sucks. In order to move out of your parents basement with a bio degree you'll have to get a healthcare license of some sort or get a CPA/learn programming or get a totally different degree and leave biology all together. There much fewer jobs for biologists than those graduating from school, and when you do get a job in this field it's usually low paying and temporary.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (6) / No Reply - Report abuse

kymossyoak in Virgie, Kentucky

14 months ago

How hard is it to get a job in something wildlife related with a BS in Biology with conservation in Ecology?

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

njbiodude in New Jersey

14 months ago

kymossyoak in Virgie, Kentucky said: How hard is it to get a job in something wildlife related with a BS in Biology with conservation in Ecology?

Insanely, I've tried for those kind of jobs with a bsc in bio, and when you do it pays very poorly and are typically temporary. If you want to work in the environmental realm get a bsc in civil engineering and after some experience get a msc in environmental engineering. That way you can work on infrastructure projects and determine how it impacts the environment. Its a solid real-world application of ecological studies.

If you want to study bats in the rainforest you'll need a PhD and (probably several) postdocs and work as a professor. This is a low paying extremely competitive field, though I'd bet its pretty satisfying to work in that environment.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Average in Winnersville, Massachusetts

14 months ago

GhostLady in Costa Mesa, California said:

By the way, if you combine your B.S. in Biology with Photography or/and Writing or/and Tutoring you can make a good 6 figures a year!

Making lies like this should be a capital crime.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (11) / No Reply - Report abuse

GareBear in Hinesville, Georgia

13 months ago

Typically, people pursue BS in Biology because they are planning to go to Medical School, to become a PA or a doctor, etc. To just get a BS in Biology and NOT plan to go further into school is, in my opinion, a big mistake. BUT it's not the end of the world either. Many people just get a bachelors degree in something because many employers look for AA or BS degree when they hire (they do not necessarily care about what you major in as much as they care about your work experience and your interview), so you can look at many careers, even something completely out of your major and apply and your chances of getting hired is much higher than someone who never attended college or completed a degree.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (3) / No (1) Reply - Report abuse

marioinvincible in West Lafayette, Indiana

13 months ago

Hey everyone, former bitter biology graduate here. I'm not posting to brag, but to honestly give advice. If you are currently a biology major and you are still in school, it would be a GREAT idea to pick up computer programming: Java, perl, C++, etc. You can either branch into the field of computational biology (which I won't recommend) or nosedive into the tech world all together. I did this, and well paying jobs (55k+/year with great benefits) are being offered to me like crazy. I had to go to graduate school in tech, and it cost me two extra years of tuition and really hard work, but I totally recommend it to everyone.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

mina in Castro Valley, California

13 months ago

Hi,

computer programming intrigues me...what do you mean exactly? I'm a senior working on my B.S Biology, what do recommend at this point if I were to go into that field? And is it a male dominated field?

Appreciate your advice.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

mina in Castro Valley, California

13 months ago

marioinvincible in West Lafayette, Indiana said: Hey everyone, former bitter biology graduate here. I'm not posting to brag, but to honestly give advice. If you are currently a biology major and you are still in school, it would be a GREAT idea to pick up computer programming: Java, perl, C++, etc. You can either branch into the field of computational biology (which I won't recommend) or nosedive into the tech world all together. I did this, and well paying jobs (55k+/year with great benefits) are being offered to me like crazy. I had to go to graduate school in tech, and it cost me two extra years of tuition and really hard work, but I totally recommend it to everyone.

Hi,

computer programming intrigues me...what do you mean exactly? I'm a senior working on my B.S Biology, what do recommend at this point if I were to go into that field? And is it a male dominated field?

Appreciate your advice.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

RyanS in San Diego, California

13 months ago

JaneWay in Elk Grove, Illinois said: I feel like like such an idiot right now. I have a BS in Biology . After I graduated, I followed a totally different path.
I know a friend of mine has a friend who also got her BS in biology and works in some company shaving pigs and working with animals, she feels like her BS in Bio was not needed.
I mean what job can I get now, right away with a bio degree? I don't have experience in research or some direct bio field. I wanted something that would be a good career path with potential to grow.
Now, I'm trying to finish an MLT program. I should have tried entering an MT program at least, but I chose the MLT program for various reasons, despite the good advice I got here on these forums. Everywhere I search, they want MTs not MLTs. I'm going to be an oddball, an MLT with a BS in Biology.
I feel like I screwed up and it's just getting worse and that most of my decisions just get worse because of desperation. I feel like schools are just there to take money.

Below is an article with few job options of what you can do with a Biology Degree.
www.jobunlocker.com/blog/what-can-you-do-with-a-biology-degree/

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

sean.neuman in Spring, Texas

13 months ago

If you have genetics, ochem, and general chem lab experience, there is a good chance you can get hired as a entry level lab tech for a biotechnology company, with a Bio major. The pay is starting about $15/hr. That might be considered low for some, but that's not bad for not having actual work experience in this economy. You'll also be getting your foot in the door. It's a promising field that can help a lot of people.

In your resume, you need to spell out relevent techniques and procedures you did in a results-oriented way. Employers like practical skills. For example, if you included Infrared Spectroscopy, you could write, "Infrared Spectroscopy - Used IR machine to generate IR spectrum of unknown distillate in distallation experiment and identified compound". Anything you write on your resume, you need to be able to talk about it in reasonable detail.

Working with an employment agency that works with science jobs is extremely advisable.They can help a lot in getting interviews.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

nunya in Furlong, Pennsylvania

13 months ago

njbiodude in New Jersey said: Insanely, I've tried for those kind of jobs with a bsc in bio, and when you do it pays very poorly and are typically temporary. If you want to work in the environmental realm get a bsc in civil engineering and after some experience get a msc in environmental engineering . That way you can work on infrastructure projects and determine how it impacts the environment. Its a solid real-world application of ecological studies.

If you want to study bats in the rainforest you'll need a PhD and (probably several) postdocs and work as a professor. This is a low paying extremely competitive field, though I'd bet its pretty satisfying to work in that environment.

I have a B.S. in biology with concentration in ecology/environmental/organismal. I was Director of Administration for a wildlife sanctuary for bats. It is very satisfying wonderful low paying work. Most of these are non profit and we ran out of funding for employees. I also did a year with AmeriCorps as a nature educator known as the "bat lady" because of my expertise. People call me all the time to ask me to do presentations on bats....for FREE. I've had it! I got an offer from a zoo who was impressed with my wildlife experience a few months ago...$8.00 hourly part time! Who lives on that! Unless you are living in a tent. I would gladly return to get my Masters but have bad credit and no living wage job to pay for school. I cannot relocate unless I am offered a decent job and I will not live in a crime ridden city. Any ideas? I have 1 year, years ago, experience in a micro lab which I loved. I don't know how to break back into the micro lab arena. Open for suggestions...

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

James Pa in Souderton, Pennsylvania

13 months ago

Any ideas? I have 1 year, years ago, experience in a micro lab which I loved.

you can maybe get your masters in micro or get a masters in CLS

The masters in my CLS program was one year but it got me some experience in microbiology which I'm finishing up at the moment.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Anonymous in Birmingham, Alabama

13 months ago

I'd recommend getting a degree in med tech or CLS. It's better to go with something in the healthcare field that requires a license or certification. I'm going for my master's in CLS, but I just started the program. I hate the massive debt I have to get into, but I feel this is the only way I'll ever be able to find employment.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

tswagga in Lorton, Virginia

12 months ago

Im getting a masters/possibly a Ph.D in Biodefense (microbiology undergrad) because I wanted to learn not just simply about Biology but also about Biological/Chemical/Nuclear weapons...Should be a decent career choice for either a path in Biology or working with the Gov't or Military....Definitely not a typical degree path, however you would be surprised about how much science and technology is incorporated with the U.S. Military (or not, we spend nearly ten fold the amount on our military than the next closest country)

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Hannah in Hammond, Indiana

12 months ago

Ok, so I’m in a senior in High school and I want to become a molecular biologist or biopsychologist researcher. What is the best degree I should get in order to become one of these? I know I’m going to need to get my masters or doctorate, but I want a well-paying and reliable job before I go into Grad school. My mom suggested speech pathology or nursing but I’m not interested in either of these fields. What I’m really looking for is a good job that I will like, that can give me a head start into the field I want to go in, and that can pay me well so I can afford to go to Grad school to become a researcher. I would appreciate the advice, I feel really lost right now. Thanks!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Riot in Massachusetts

12 months ago

Hannah in Hammond, Indiana said: What I’m really looking for is a good job that I will like, that can give me a head start into the field I want to go in, and that can pay me well so I can afford to go to Grad school to become a researcher. I would appreciate the advice, I feel really lost right now. Thanks!

If you want to be a research biologist of any kind, your only real choice is to get a PhD. With a Bachelor's or Master's, if you're lucky enough to find a job, it will either be not directly related to research, or you will be working on someone else's projects. I've been told multiple times that a PhD is your "license to think for yourself." Unfortunately, you won't likely have the background to succeed in a biology PhD program without an undergrad degree in Biology, Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Chemistry, etc. I say "unfortunate" because TONS of people major in these fields, so finding a (good paying) job if you need to before grad school is much more difficult than with a more marketable major. You also won't have the skills to find a job in related fields, such as Clinical Laboratory Science or Engineering. The good news is that those degrees will prepare you for a transition to allied health type fields following a Post-Bacc or Master's program if you decide not to pursue science at the PhD level (but, then you did waste a few years getting your Bio degree when you could have just gone for something employable to begin with). That said, if you're worried about having enough money for a PhD program, don't be - Science and Engineering doctoral students typically get tuition waivers and a stipend. (You get paid to earn your Doctorate.)

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (5) / No Reply - Report abuse

bluesurf in Phoenix, Arizona

12 months ago

Lynn in Melbourne, Florida said: It was a preclinical CRO. I worked as a research associate for toxicology services, and then a regulatory report writer. I moved around because of my husband's job so now I have to look for another job and looking into clinical research .

I saw Walt Disney has numerous animal program internship openings right now. If I am a newly graduate, that is definitely a place I would like to work. I doubt they will hire me now!

Thank-you for posting information about internships I would of never knew.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes / No Reply - Report abuse

Little-T in Reston, Virginia

11 months ago

I'm back guys. No luck with Aerotek or Lab-Support for getting me a job. Been talking with them for over a year now. Now I'm in a Bioinformatics program and currently studying for an IT certification. I also know Java and looking to get a job in IT support. The entry pay is about $45k which is higher than the average $33k for what is given to a lab tech in the area. Get out of the field if can Bio majors or you are all doomed!

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (2) / No Reply - Report abuse

ForeIN in Compton, California

11 months ago

Eventual Biologist in Long Beach, California said: You are LUCKY you were able to graduate from CSULB... they aren't even taking new applicants this semester and declared every single major impacted. People that are trying to get in (like me) are screwed. Don't give up...

Omg yes! I found this out a few days ago actually because I plan to transfer as a bio major but now i might reconsider CSULB. I didn't get in when i applied as a freshmen but I got into other CSUs. I choose community college since I didn't get in to school I really wanted to plus its cheaper.

So if having an impacted major even worth it? I don't think I want to do extra classes and have the same outcome as getting a degree from another CSU that's not impacted. Im thinking of Humboldt since they have sooooo many science majors available.

- Was this comment helpful? Yes (1) / No Reply - Report abuse

Page:  « First « Previous   10  11  12  13  14  15  Next »   Last »

» Sign in or create an account to comment on this topic.