Do you all think that making follow up calls for jobs is pointless?

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Dee in Baltimore, Maryland

20 months ago

For the jobs that I've been able to find phone numbers for, I have attempted to do follow up calls. Everytime I tried to do one, nobody would let me speak to the hiring manager. I always get "we'll call you if we're interested".

At this point, I am lost with trying to find a job. The WORST situation I had was when I got a call from a manager from Party City about being interviewed. I called the store and asked for the manager who left the message. I CAN hear clearly and the employee who answered the phone informed me that the person didn't work there. I tried calling and calling at MANY different times to see if the manager was there. I tried calling again and doing a follow up call as if I was never called for the interview but I got the "we'll call you if we're interested" excuse again so I said screw them.

I called there only one day after receiving the message on my voicemail.

I have six years of experience as a cashier and I can't believe how hard it is to find another job (tried looking for a seasonal holiday retail job with no luck), especially since I have one year of experience as a head cashier (I got promoted to the position at my former job).

I had to drop out of college to help support my family. I don't have children but I help my sister with her bills since she's is struggling financially also. I'd LOVE to go back to college but I can't now because a lot of jobs will refuse to hire someone in college.

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

20 months ago

You are better off with some type of a trade - usually a two-year degree. For the jobs you are looking for (cashier), if they don't hire you on the spot, they probably won't.

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Nick in Linden, New Jersey

20 months ago

Yeah sorry to say follow up calls are pointless for all forms of retail. If they want you, they'll call you.

The exceptions are management-level jobs. If you are going for a supervisor position or above, a follow up call or email may help. For the job I have now, there was a 2 month interval between my applying and their hiring me. Employers are like wizards, they always react to your resume precisely when they mean to.

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Bluetea in Texas

20 months ago

Dee in Baltimore, Maryland said: For the jobs that I've been able to find phone numbers for, I have attempted to do follow up calls. Everytime I tried to do one, nobody would let me speak to the hiring manager. I always get "we'll call you if we're interested".

At this point, I am lost with trying to find a job. The WORST situation I had was when I got a call from a manager from Party City about being interviewed. I called the store and asked for the manager who left the message. I CAN hear clearly and the employee who answered the phone informed me that the person didn't work there. I tried calling and calling at MANY different times to see if the manager was there. I tried calling again and doing a follow up call as if I was never called for the interview but I got the "we'll call you if we're interested" excuse again so I said screw them.

I called there only one day after receiving the message on my voicemail.

I have six years of experience as a cashier and I can't believe how hard it is to find another job (tried looking for a seasonal holiday retail job with no luck), especially since I have one year of experience as a head cashier (I got promoted to the position at my former job).

I had to drop out of college to help support my family. I don't have children but I help my sister with her bills since she's is struggling financially also. I'd LOVE to go back to college but I can't now because a lot of jobs will refuse to hire someone in college.

That has been my experience so I no longer bother with "following up". All the books say to do this but a lot of that advice is just too out-of-date.

Your best shot at a job is locally and ideally from someone who refers you to a hiring manager. Everything else is a number's game.

If you are searching on the internet look for "part time" or "weekends". These jobs are hard to fill so there is less competition.

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Dee in Baltimore, Maryland

20 months ago

Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida said: You are better off with some type of a trade - usually a two-year degree. For the jobs you are looking for (cashier), if they don't hire you on the spot, they probably won't.

Unfortunately, the trade schools in my area charge more for tuition than what I was paying at my community college.

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Dee in Baltimore, Maryland

20 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: That has been my experience so I no longer bother with "following up". All the books say to do this but a lot of that advice is just too out-of-date.

Your best shot at a job is locally and ideally from someone who refers you to a hiring manager. Everything else is a number's game.

If you are searching on the internet look for "part time" or "weekends". These jobs are hard to fill so there is less competition.

I didn't read any books, I just took advice from my sister (she's an RN who's been at her job since 2001, so she doesn't fully understand how rough it is). Unfortunately, I don't know anybody who can refer me to a hiring manager and I have not found any job networking events in my area.

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Dee in Baltimore, Maryland

20 months ago

Dee in Baltimore, Maryland said: I didn't read any books, I just took advice from my sister (she's an RN who's been at her job since 2001, so she doesn't fully understand how rough it is). Unfortunately, I don't know anybody who can refer me to a hiring manager and I have not found any job networking events in my area.

I will definitely look into finding part-time and weekend jobs to apply for specifically, thank you.

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

20 months ago

You have a sister who is an RN (so do I). You have something to work with right there. Think about LPN. A lot of nursing homes have their own CNA program and hire you after. But LPN is like a year program. Get a student loan. That's a start. Then you can work on RN. Think about court reporting. They have a voice writing seven-month program. (Opportunities are limited for voice writing). Digital-electronic court reporting. Hair dresser.

Surely you don't want to do retail forever. This is a good time to get the skills for something better.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

20 months ago

Dee in Baltimore, Maryland said: For the jobs that I've been able to find phone numbers for, I have attempted to do follow up calls. Everytime I tried to do one, nobody would let me speak to the hiring manager. I always get "we'll call you if we're interested".
Finally, a real world example of what many users here have been saying forever. Unless explicitly instructed otherwise, yes, followup phone calls (and e-mails) are pointless.

Candidates have three opportunites to impress employers. First, resumes and cover letters. The purpose of these materials is to pique the employer's interest enough to invite candidates for interviews. Second, and first and foremost, actually, is the interview(s). There, candidates meet with employers F2F and can state their case for being hired. Third is the post-interview thank-you letter(s). Some people believe thank-you letters are ineffective and a waste of time. Waste of whose time? Yours? What else are you doing? In any event, thank-you letters are a courtesy. They afford the opportunity to resell one's self. They afford the opportunity to emphasize areas that weren't emphasized at the interview.

All one gets are these three opportunities. Then one must wait. Further followups will likely do nothing or more harm than good. My experience is employers will call within a few days max if they're still interested. Let it go after ten to fifteen working days max if you've heard nothing. Do NOT expect a rejection phone call or formal rejection letter or e-mail. Keep looking in the meantime. If they should call after the ten or fifteen days, you can decide if you're still interested.

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Bluetea in Texas

20 months ago

Dee in Baltimore, Maryland said: I didn't read any books, I just took advice from my sister (she's an RN who's been at her job since 2001, so she doesn't fully understand how rough it is). Unfortunately, I don't know anybody who can refer me to a hiring manager and I have not found any job networking events in my area.

LinkedIn should have several groups in the Baltimore area. Still, networking takes time. Its one of the best ways to find a job but it doesn't happen overnight.

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Bluetea in Texas

20 months ago

Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: Finally, a real world example of what many users here have been saying forever. Unless explicitly instructed otherwise, yes, followup phone calls (and e-mails) are pointless.

Candidates have three opportunites to impress employers. First, resumes and cover letters. The purpose of these materials is to pique the employer's interest enough to invite candidates for interviews. Second, and first and foremost, actually, is the interview(s). There, candidates meet with employers F2F and can state their case for being hired. Third is the post-interview thank-you letter(s). Some people believe thank-you letters are ineffective and a waste of time. Waste of whose time? Yours? What else are you doing? In any event, thank-you letters are a courtesy. They afford the opportunity to resell one's self. They afford the opportunity to emphasize areas that weren't emphasized at the interview.

All one gets are these three opportunities. Then one must wait. Further followups will likely do nothing or more harm than good. My experience is employers will call within a few days max if they're still interested. Let it go after ten to fifteen working days max if you've heard nothing. Do NOT expect a rejection phone call or formal rejection letter or e-mail. Keep looking in the meantime. If they should call after the ten or fifteen days, you can decide if you're still interested.

Oh, its the unemployed guy giving career advice again. Heh!

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

20 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: Still, networking takes time. Its one of the best ways to find a job but it doesn't happen overnight.

Yea, but don't expect miracles. Meaning, don't expect that your contacts will find you another job at the same pay level, close to home, doing what you want to do, etc, etc...

If you know people in high places than you can expect the same pay (probably better), close to home, doing exactly what you want to do, etc, etc....

Most people's networks will find you something but will make you underemployed.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

20 months ago

LOL Yes. Not much different than your advice:

Bluetea in Texas said: That has been my experience so I no longer bother with "following up". All the books say to do this but a lot of that advice is just too out-of-date.
You and I will never agree about thank-you letters. That's fine.

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Bluetea in Texas

20 months ago

Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: LOL Yes. Not much different than your advice:

You and I will never agree about thank-you letters. That's fine.

No, send your Thank You letters. Seems to be working out for you about as much as me baking them a cake after the interview. Ha!

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

20 months ago

LOL I will, Bluetea. Sending thank-you letters helped me get my first legal job. The office manager made it a point of telling me that my timely thank-you letters impressed her and the attorneys. As a direct result I was given a second interview and, eventually, a job.

Maybe you aren't doing enough. Try sending the entire bakery.

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ToBoeingOrNotToBoeing in Seattle, Washington

20 months ago

I would not do a follow up call, ever. I would send a thank you letter but most likely an e-mail.

People are busy and e-mail or a letter is non-intrusive, lets them decide when to allot time to read it, etc.

And anything written almost always comes off (for me) as more thoughtful (and more about the person you're sending it to) whereas calling and 'following up' is more about the caller and his/her needs, which can be annoying for busy people and an indicator of what you might be like as an employee; i.e., needy.

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Bluetea in Texas

20 months ago

Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: LOL I will, Bluetea. Sending thank-you letters helped me get my first legal job. The office manager made it a point of telling me that my timely thank-you letters impressed her and the attorneys. As a direct result I was given a second interview and, eventually, a job.

Maybe you aren't doing enough. Try sending the entire bakery.

My first job, I wasn't even looking. I had accompanied a friend of mine who had just graduated high school to an insurance company who he knew was hiring. We didn't even know what a resume was in those days.

I waited in the lobby when this woman came out from what they use to call "Personnel" and she began asking me a few questions.

I was hired on the spot! No resume, no experience and I was still in high school.

Course, like my Dad use to say, "Things are more difficult today - you have computers".

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Bluetea in Texas

20 months ago

ToBoeingOrNotToBoeing in Seattle, Washington said:
People are busy and e-mail or a letter is non-intrusive, lets them decide when to allot time to read it, etc.

If at all.

At my old job, sometimes, we wouldn't answer an email if it came from certain people. Ten minutes, later someone would wander by and say, "Heeeey, how's it going? Did you get my email?"

All of us would burst out laughing.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

20 months ago

You could make a case that an e-mail would be intrusive. People who hire are busy. They receive zillions of e-mail daily. They have to deal with each one of them...one way or the other. The "other" could mean a daemon bounce, failure to penetrate a firewall or spam filter, being ignored, or outright deletion. I remember watching my last attorney-boss highlight and delete dozens of e-mails at a time.

Compare with a mailed letter. Mail is non intrusive. People are used to receiving mail. They don't mind receiving it. In the meantime, there is something about e-mail that makes it a pain in the ass.

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ToBoeingOrNotToBoeing in Seattle, Washington

20 months ago

Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: You could make a case that an e-mail would be intrusive. People who hire are busy. They receive zillions of e-mail daily. They have to deal with each one of them...one way or the other. The "other" could mean a daemon bounce, failure to penetrate a firewall or spam filter, being ignored, or outright deletion. I remember watching my last attorney-boss highlight and delete dozens of e-mails at a time.

Compare with a mailed letter. Mail is non intrusive. People are used to receiving mail. They don't mind receiving it. In the meantime, there is something about e-mail that makes it a pain in the ass.

I know, e-mail can be annoying. I would just make sure that, in the e-mail, I made it about them - and not me asking for info or asking anything. I would strictly tell them how much I liked their company, them, etc. and I'd keep it super brief.

If there was more time and the hiring was protracted, I'd hurry and send a note if I really wanted the job.

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Bluetea in Texas

20 months ago

Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: I remember watching my last attorney-boss highlight and delete dozens of e-mails at a time.

One guy I worked with said, "Never answer an email after 4:00 pm on a Friday. No good can ever come of it". HA!

Its not that email is intrusive, its just that yours is just one of dozens all vying for a limited attention span.

Kinda like all those Thank You cards piling up on the desk of the HR girl. HA! Now a nice German Chocolate Cake is going to make people remember you. Heh!

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John in Catonsville, Maryland

20 months ago

Trying to make those HR folks into diabetics are you? :)

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

20 months ago

[QUOTE who="Bluetea in Texas" Now a nice German Chocolate Cake is going to make people remember you. Heh!Once again, I think you should send the entire bakery, or the entirety of Germany.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

20 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: Now a nice German Chocolate Cake is going to make people remember you. Heh!
Once again, I think you should send the entire bakery, or the entirety of Germany.

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Stillsmiling in Kingsland, Georgia

20 months ago

Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: LOL Yes. Not much different than your advice:

You and I will never agree about thank-you letters. That's fine.

I am also a firm believer in the thank u notes. A friend of mine who is an HR Director told me that those letters/emails CAN make a difference. Even if it doesn't, I feel better sending them. The key is making them very polite, short and to the point.

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Bluetea in Texas

20 months ago

Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: Once again, I think you should send the entire bakery, or the entirety of Germany.

I think you should conclude the interview by offering to wash their car. You know, go the extra mile. Ha!

Just kidding! Go ahead and send them.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

20 months ago

Stillsmiling in Kingsland, Georgia said: I am also a firm believer in the thank u notes. A friend of mine who is an HR Director told me that those letters/emails CAN make a difference. Even if it doesn't, I feel better sending them.
That's another point. By sending thank-you letters I feel I have done everything possible to promote my candidacy. And there's no harm in sending thank-you letters, as compared, perhaps, to e-mails or repeated telephonic followups.

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

20 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: I think you should conclude the interview by offering to wash their car.
That reminds me of a story. The shareholder in my first law firm was very demanding. Never mind all the extra unpaid hours she expected us to put in, she loved to be waited on. There was the time when she got a new car. Instead of asking the dealership to do it, she asked a senior associate in the firm, that is, an experienced and older attorney, to put on the license plates! I believe he did it - but that is something not to be asked of an attorney or anyone else in the firm.

We may have been her slaves - but we were not her 'slaves.'

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Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado

20 months ago

Dee in Baltimore, Maryland said: I have six years of experience as a cashier and I can't believe how hard it is to find another job (tried looking for a seasonal holiday retail job with no luck), especially since I have one year of experience as a head cashier (I got promoted to the position at my former job).
You could be a bank teller. Banks require cash handling experience for the job. You have it. Also whatever college you have would be a plus.

Teller work doesn't pay as much as one might think and invloves a lot of standing. It is entry level work for banking and could work into something better.

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Bluetea in Texas

20 months ago

Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: You could be a bank teller. Banks require cash handling experience for the job. You have it. Also whatever college you have would be a plus.

Teller work doesn't pay as much as one might think and invloves a lot of standing. It is entry level work for banking and could work into something better.

I was a bank teller in college. It is being automated more and more but it is still a fairly easy job to get.

The drawback is that it doesn't pay very much and you have to be flexible when it comes to scheduling. You will never have the same hours from one week to the next.

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Parafreegal in Chicago, Illinois

20 months ago

Unemployed Paralegal in Denver, Colorado said: Finally, a real world example of what many users here have been saying forever. Unless explicitly instructed otherwise, yes, followup phone calls (and e-mails) are pointless.

Candidates have three opportunites to impress employers. First, resumes and cover letters. The purpose of these materials is to pique the employer's interest enough to invite candidates for interviews. Second, and first and foremost, actually, is the interview(s). There, candidates meet with employers F2F and can state their case for being hired. Third is the post-interview thank-you letter(s). Some people believe thank-you letters are ineffective and a waste of time. Waste of whose time? Yours? What else are you doing? In any event, thank-you letters are a courtesy. They afford the opportunity to resell one's self. They afford the opportunity to emphasize areas that weren't emphasized at the interview.

All one gets are these three opportunities. Then one must wait. Further followups will likely do nothing or more harm than good. My experience is employers will call within a few days max if they're still interested. Let it go after ten to fifteen working days max if you've heard nothing. Do NOT expect a rejection phone call or formal rejection letter or e-mail. Keep looking in the meantime. If they should call after the ten or fifteen days, you can decide if you're still interested.

All of this is true, and I agree one hundred percent.

People don't answer phones nowadays at the office anyway unless they know who is calling and they want to speak to that person right at that exact moment.

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Joe Gagill in Monticello, New York

20 months ago

Parafreegal in Chicago, Illinois said: All of this is true, and I agree one hundred percent.

People don't answer phones nowadays at the office anyway unless they know who is calling and they want to speak to that person right at that exact moment.

True.

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Dee in Baltimore, Maryland

20 months ago

Thanks for the advice, all. I have been trying to get a teller's job for awhile. I sprained my ankle two days ago while I was out job hunting so I gotta sit in the house for a few days. I don't have a PC so I can't apply for anymore jobs until I can get to my local one stop career center.

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Dee in Baltimore, Maryland

20 months ago

Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida said: You have a sister who is an RN (so do I). You have something to work with right there. Think about LPN. A lot of nursing homes have their own CNA program and hire you after. But LPN is like a year program. Get a student loan. That's a start. Then you can work on RN. Think about court reporting. They have a voice writing seven-month program. (Opportunities are limited for voice writing). Digital- electronic court reporting. Hair dresser.

Surely you don't want to do retail forever. This is a good time to get the skills for something better.

Thanks so much for your advice. I must pay off the money that I owe my college for dropping out so unfortunately, I am unable to go back to college right away so as of now, I am looking to find a job so that I can save up and be able to re-pay my college (to become a court reporter, I have to attend classes at another local college). My credit is jacked up (not because of credit cards) so I can not get a loan.

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Dee in Baltimore, Maryland

17 months ago

*sigh* two months since I've posted in this thread & things still aren't looking good. After visiting my local career center in January, I went to a job fair for this job (who's name that I shall not mention).

The job hired me and other on the spot. All I had to do was take a drug test & get a background check done. I had no issues with either.

In February, I had attended two training orientations for the job (one was to do new hire paperwork & the other was to do training). At the second training, they informed everyone that there would be one last training session the week before opening day (it is currently the week before opening day). they didn't call like they said they were going to do so.

I called the company & their mailbox is FULL (I'm sure there are others who have contacted them about this). I emailed them but I'm not even sure if the email was received by the appropriate individuals.

I've still been filling out job applications anyway and I've only had three interviews so far between January, 2013
& now. I got rejected from all three of the jobs despite the fact that I presented myself well at the interviews and have experience for the jobs I've applied for.

I think the issue is that the job is seasonal (only lasts for the baseball season) so therefore it's hard to find employees. I actually saw a posting from the company on Craigslist a week ago. I don't understand why they'd look for more employees without telling their so called "current employees" about what's going on.

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Dee in Baltimore, Maryland

17 months ago

They should have posted on Indeed, Monster & Career Builder also. I don't understand how a company could have a darn FB page but don't how to get the word out about a position? Putting up ad on a bulletin board at three city one stop career centers & posting on CL doesn't cut it.

They do post jobs on their website but not too many folks are checking for service jobs that won't last long and has low wages.

I don't know if I'm in limbo with this job or unemployed yet.

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Parafreegal in Chicago, Illinois

17 months ago

I don't even know what to say to that, Dee. I think you have until the end of business today (Friday) to find out if you have a job since the season starts in a few days.

Bat boy for the Orioles? :D

Three interviews in three months is pretty good. My last interview for a real job was in early October. But I do have one today.

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Dog_Guy in Miami, Florida

17 months ago

Yes, it's pointless. If they want you, they will be calling.

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Bluetea in Texas

17 months ago

Dee in Baltimore, Maryland said: They should have posted on Indeed, Monster & Career Builder also. I don't understand how a company could have a darn FB page but don't how to get the word out about a position? Putting up ad on a bulletin board at three city one stop career centers & posting on CL doesn't cut it.

They do post jobs on their website but not too many folks are checking for service jobs that won't last long and has low wages.

I don't know if I'm in limbo with this job or unemployed yet.

Its actually expensive for a company to post their jobs all over town. Many brand name companies like Google, Oracle, Kaiser, Motorola, etc., don't have to. They put up a position on their career link and that gets them all the candidates they need. Doesn't cost them very much at all.

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Dee in Baltimore, Maryland

17 months ago

Parafreegal in Chicago, Illinois said: I don't even know what to say to that, Dee. I think you have until the end of business today (Friday) to find out if you have a job since the season starts in a few days.

Bat boy for the Orioles? :D

Three interviews in three months is pretty good. My last interview for a real job was in early October. But I do have one today.

Good luck with your interview! Nooooo, I'm a woman so I'm certainly not gonna be a batboy. I won't name the exact position I was gonna get but all I can say is that I don't know what the people who'll go to the games are going to do if they'll get hungry or thirsty while there.

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Dee in Baltimore, Maryland

17 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: Its actually expensive for a company to post their jobs all over town. Many brand name companies like Google, Oracle, Kaiser, Motorola, etc., don't have to. They put up a position on their career link and that gets them all the candidates they need. Doesn't cost them very much at all.

I definitely realize that but this company that I'm in limbo with is probably not a very sought out company. As I posted above, the job was just going to be seasonal and it was minimum wage PLUS employees ONLY work on days when there are home games.

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Dee in Baltimore, Maryland

16 months ago

Update: I am now an employee at Camden Yards for the concession dept. I am grateful for the job but it would be great if I had a full time job. I went to a few interviews after I started working with my current employer and they did not go so well.

Being that I only work days when there are home games, a lot of other employers didn't wanna hire me. l don't even really care because I'm not quitting my current job to work another job who'll probably start me off at $7.25-7.50/hour. I get paid a little more than that at my current job & there are even opportunities to work overtime (when there are double headers). Lastly, I often get tips.

I'll just worry about job hunting when I'm offered a full time position or after the MLB season ends.

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