Frustrated College Graduate

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Susan L in Edmonton, Alberta

42 months ago

Hello Jennifer,

I feel the same way as you. I graduated too and am having a hard time seeking a job related to my degree. I have tried to apply for many site. I recently found a book called " The New Job Search" by Molly Wendell. She gives a fresh approach to networking your way into a job. It is a great book as she experience what it was like to be out of a job. I am going to try out some of her suggestion. Heck what I am doing is apparently is not working. Hang in there.

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annalaurabrown in Salt Lake City, Utah

42 months ago

You may need to think outside of the box and even consider starting your own business. It took me 3.5 years after graduation to get a full time job. In the mean time I worked part time and did my own business. I made it work.

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boby in San Francisco, California

42 months ago

Jennifer in Los Angeles, California said: So, I just graduated and can't find a job.

I'm just SUPER frustrated, I was active on campus, I did a lot I worked with so many people, students, staff. Now I'm back at home and I'm having the most difficult time finding a job. I honestly don't even know what to do, filling out all these applications discourages me. I know the job market bites, but MY GOODNESS.. I'm just frustrated and I know I'm special - I know that might sound cocky but I feel like I'm a diamond that got thrown under some dusty tables in a thrift shop.

Graduation was a fun time, but in the back of my head I was really thinking of how bleak it was here in the "real world" as far as the job market goes.

Does anyone else feel this way? Am I crazy? What advice would you give me?

It's just so frustrating, I don't want my talents and skill and my willingness to learn to just go to waste .. to just atrophy and die. =_=; Because that's what it feels like!

Hi, don't be angry, join the club I have a master degree in economics and Iam stuck nothing

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Paige in Eagle Bridge, New York

42 months ago

Join the alumni club. It's worse the longer ago your degree was, but even Yalies are having a hard time, so that's really telling you something.

The only thing I could possibly say is to go right back to school and stay there, take master's programs, certificate programs, etc, get another bachelor's degree, something, to keep the financial aid coming in to live off of it until things get better or until you're of retirement age, whichever comes first.

That may suck, but it's all I can think of!!!

And it doesn't matter what you majored in. Even science majors. That is because with science majors the only way you're getting even an internship is to be under-21, and have at least a 4.0 GPA and at least 20 professors' recommendations backing you up. And of course full-time work references on top of that. When I was an undergrad I just applied for a government summer job and GOT it, but that was back in 1995.

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Paige in Eagle Bridge, New York

42 months ago

Don't feel bad. My degree was over 10 years ago, but at least one thing I got out of it (of doing all my own term papers myself) was that I now type over 95 wpm which is almost "transcription" rate. And I'm desperately applying for Typist jobs with any state government in any state that's taking them. Yeah, I majored in Biology to be a TYPIST. Which, of course, is going out of style.

I spend a lot of my time trying to get my typing speed over 100 wpm for all the good that'll do. Not without recent work experience....even temp agencies won't give me the time of day. When I go in in person I get the brush-off interview. It's hard for me to tell these days how much of that is because I'm American Indian and how much of it REALLY is that they have no work out there. You see, I've been having a harder time than I should, ever since I graduated and that was in the "roaring 90's" so that's why I'm jaded.

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Paige in Eagle Bridge, New York

42 months ago

Susan L in Edmonton, Alberta said: Hello Jennifer,

I feel the same way as you. I graduated too and am having a hard time seeking a job related to my degree. I have tried to apply for many site. I recently found a book called " The New Job Search" by Molly Wendell. She gives a fresh approach to networking your way into a job. It is a great book as she experience what it was like to be out of a job. I am going to try out some of her suggestion. Heck what I am doing is apparently is not working. Hang in there.

You're in EDMONTON and having problems?! Alberta is where people keep telling me I should go to look for a job!!

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Paige in Eagle Bridge, New York

42 months ago

This doesn't help because "the times have changed" but when I first graduated I eked out a living getting typing, data entry and transcription jobs here and there. That was back in the good ol'days when agencies would give me the time of day. Those were Kelly and Manpower and a few others. Fat lot of good that does these days, though.

If you can stomach telemarketing.....of course, that's drying up too.

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Cassaleenie in Lafayette, Indiana

42 months ago

I know EXACTLY how you feel. I graduated in December '10 with my BA in Marketing Communications. I couldn't find anything at all. No one wanted to give me the time of day. They all wanted Master's degrees. I have had 3 internships and have close to a 4.0. It's really sad that all of that hard work seems like a waste of time and money. I finally found a part-time job working as an assistant to a marketing manager. I'm not making much money at all though. I'm seriously considering going back to school to get my MBA or I may completely change and go into the medical field since that is something we will always need, regardless of how our economy sucks. My advice is to hang in there and keep looking. Contact your school to see if they do any career placement. My school had a career website that was reputable. It was how I found the part-time job. Best of luck to you! And to all of us! Stay strong out there!

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still on the UE train! in Chicago, Illinois

42 months ago

Hey! I can relate. I graduated in May '09. I did retail for a little bit and got laid off from that. Now, I've been unemployed for a year. Don't give up. It's so easy to get discouraged, but hang in there.

Is Manpower any good in 2011?

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

42 months ago

Jennifer: What did you take up in college? You're not alone. There are a lot of other college graduates in the same boat as you. It's a shame that you spent all this time and money putting yourself through college and now you can't even find a job in your field.

Like I said, there has to be other jobs out there besides the medical field.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

42 months ago

Paige in Eagle Bridge, New York said: This doesn't help because "the times have changed" but when I first graduated I eked out a living getting typing, data entry and transcription jobs here and there. That was back in the good ol'days when agencies would give me the time of day. Those were Kelly and Manpower and a few others. Fat lot of good that does these days, though.

If you can stomach telemarketing.....of course, that's drying up too.

Paige: You're right up my alley! I have filing, typing, word processing, Internet, and data entry skills. I've also been working in the call centers on and off since 1983. Most of the telemarketing service agencies and market research firms have practically disappeared. But yet, back in the 80's and even into the 90's, there were plenty of them. I guess the Do-Not-Call list has practically put them all out of business.

I also believe that office support jobs are disappearing as well. Some of the places in downtown Philadelphia, for example, don't even have a receptionist. I see very few ads for data entry clerks, file clerks, and clerk typists. That's because automation has replaced them. And besides, a lot of managers do their own typing and record keeping (please correct me if I'm wrong). Let's not forget twenty, twenty-five, and even thirty years ago, they were screaming for secretaries, receptionists, clerk typists, regular typists, and word processors. I think they have gone the way of the dinosaur as well.

I know that I sound like a broken record, but most of the jobs today are either in the health care or high tech. In fact, the job market today is simply saturated with health care jobs. Don't get me wrong now. If anybody chooses to go into health care, then I respect their choice. But health care isn't for me, and the bottom line.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

42 months ago

Paige in Eagle Bridge, New York said: This doesn't help because "the times have changed" but when I first graduated I eked out a living getting typing, data entry and transcription jobs here and there. That was back in the good ol'days when agencies would give me the time of day. Those were Kelly and Manpower and a few others. Fat lot of good that does these days, though.

If you can stomach telemarketing.....of course, that's drying up too.

Paige: You're right up my alley! I have filing, typing, word processing, Internet, and data entry skills. I've also been working in the call centers on and off since 1983. Most of the telemarketing service agencies and market research firms have practically disappeared. But yet, back in the 80's and even into the 90's, there were plenty of them. I guess the Do-Not-Call list has practically put them all out of business.

I also believe that office support jobs are disappearing as well. Some of the places in downtown Philadelphia, for example, don't even have a receptionist. I see very few ads for data entry clerks, file clerks, and clerk typists. That's because automation has replaced them. And besides, a lot of managers do their own typing and record keeping (please correct me if I'm wrong). Let's not forget twenty, twenty-five, and even thirty years ago, they were screaming for secretaries, receptionists, clerk typists, regular typists, and word processors. I think they have gone the way of the dinosaur as well.

I know that I'm going to sound like a broken record, but most of the jobs today are either in the health care or high tech. In fact, the job market today is simply saturated with health care jobs. Don't get me wrong now. If anybody chooses to go into health care, then I respect their choice. But health care isn't for me, and the bottom line.

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

42 months ago

Cassaleenie in Lafayette, Indiana said: I know EXACTLY how you feel. I graduated in December '10 with my BA in Marketing Communications. I couldn't find anything at all. No one wanted to give me the time of day. They all wanted Master's degrees. I have had 3 internships and have close to a 4.0. It's really sad that all of that hard work seems like a waste of time and money. I finally found a part-time job working as an assistant to a marketing manager. I'm not making much money at all though. I'm seriously considering going back to school to get my MBA or I may completely change and go into the medical field since that is something we will always need, regardless of how our economy sucks. My advice is to hang in there and keep looking. Contact your school to see if they do any career placement. My school had a career website that was reputable. It was how I found the part-time job. Best of luck to you! And to all of us! Stay strong out there!

They not only want Master's degrees, they want so many years of experience in their industry as well.

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empathyinla in Burbank, California

41 months ago

i can relate, but i have a slightly different problem. i was born with an exceptional singing voice, artistic talent, ear for music, eye for fashion, and ability to reason and write at an abstract level. I was considered gifted in each of these arenas for the majority of my life, yet here I sit, entering data into an excel file... and not particularly well, might I add. While I've found my way into the entertainment industry in a marketing position that plenty of people would kill to have, i'm not making use of any of my gifts. what is the point of having exceptional talent if you're not using it? how do i change my course without the requisite art, journalism, fashion, music degrees?

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Cassaleenie in Lafayette, Indiana

41 months ago

Yes, most places want masters and lots of years of experience. I do have close to 10 years experience, but I guess that still isn't enough. :( I hear ya empathyinla, I have always loved writing and art. I excelled at these in school and I figured it would be best to turn these into a career. It didn't work out quite like I thought. I am in the same boat as you, mostly doing data entry, and frankly, I am very, very bored. So much talent wasted, which depresses me since I know there are people who are more talented than I am, which is why I am doing data entry and setting up events. That's why I'm thinking of going back to school and going into the medical field. I do love helping people.

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annyomus in marietta, Georgia

41 months ago

empathyinla in Burbank, California said: i can relate, but i have a slightly different problem. i was born with an exceptional singing voice, artistic talent, ear for music, eye for fashion, and ability to reason and write at an abstract level. I was considered gifted in each of these arenas for the majority of my life, yet here I sit, entering data into an excel file... and not particularly well, might I add. While I've found my way into the entertainment industry in a marketing position that plenty of people would kill to have, i'm not making use of any of my gifts. what is the point of having exceptional talent if you're not using it? how do i change my course without the requisite art, journalism, fashion, music degrees?

hi there...
can i ask what you do in marketing? i understand being bored and feeling your talent is wasted.....also feeling that you have to go back to school...

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2008 Grad in Holyoke, Massachusetts

41 months ago

This is depressing.... The more time goes on the more under paid and under employed graduates there will be!

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empathyinla in Burbank, California

41 months ago

annyomus in marietta, Georgia said: hi there...
can i ask what you do in marketing? i understand being bored and feeling your talent is wasted.....also feeling that you have to go back to school...

international brand development/integrated marketing for a major studio.

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cassaleenie in West Lafayette, Indiana

41 months ago

empathyinla in Burbank, California said: international brand development/integrated marketing for a major studio.

Well, I think you should be thankful for that position. It sounds pretty awesome! I'm a marketing coordinator for a financial advising firm. But, it's more like a glorified assistant. :S However, financial advising firms are predicted to grow in the next 10 years. I want to make really good money NOW though. :P

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ShaneD in San Antonio, Texas

40 months ago

I got my bachelors degree 2 years ago and have been working various 8 dollar an hour, and attempted to but failed at starting 3 different businesses. Congrats, you fell into the biggest scam of our lifetime, the student loan/ college trap. All you life people been telling you "go to college so you can get a good job and have all the nice things you want!". Take a look back and you will realize 90 percent of those people have never been to college. they just regurgitate what they hear over and over again till they believe it.

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Reliable Source in Reseda, California

35 months ago

You all should go to your local job worksource center! I found employment right after graduation with the help of many and supportive people that work there. Some people that work there are really rude and as most teens in high school would call them "haters"- but i turned that into a positive. If you approach a person(s) positively they would treat you with respect, well at least that is what I always tried and have luckily succeeded. I'm going for my masters this starting 2012 spring quarter and although I am in case management social work I know this is just a stepping stone in what I truly what in my life career. If you are one of those people that don't want to ask and find solutions to your problem begin to wonder and ask yourself what kind of student are you? Afterall everyone is a teacher and everyone is a student. Ask questions like a good student you were or even weren't in graduate school. I admit I am not one to go and ask for help but it worked out for me. Take this information into consideration and if it doesn't work out at least you tried! BUT I sure do hope it works out for you all!!!

Best Regards!

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Joe in Lansing, Michigan

34 months ago

Jennifer, I understand how you feel! I graduated last November and I worked full time and went to school full time to gain my BA. I'm married and have one child. I work as a purchasing manager and traffic controller at a job that doesn't reward educated individuals. One of the greatest misnomer's is the fallacy that after the degree, you apply for jobs that compliment your degree and it doesn't fit. I been looking for jobs eight months prior to my initial graduation date and have worked at my job for 12 years. I encourage myself with the idea that "it will get better" or "someone will call me." But, I believe one thing I will do different and encourage everyone that reads this that is in the same job search boat me and Jennifer are in, do interest interviews! Research a certain business you have interest in working at, and locate an individual that you call and request a 5-15 minute informal interview. Learn how the people behind the ranks think! If given the opportunity, go to the interest interview with your resume and ask the individual to critique your resume, blend and mesh with the person and other people. Every business has a culture, do you fit? Remember, online interaction just doesn't remove the personal interaction, but also networking. People hire people, not the internet, so we need to modify our job searching skills. I too graduated magna cum laude and have a well-decorated resume, but cannot land as much as a job interview. I applied to over 100 jobs in eight months and had only four interviews, none of which transitioned to a job offer. But we need to remember how difficult it was for us, and when we land that job and become a person that can influence the hiring methods in our careers, to look at every resume possible. The other end of this is employers that use this process of elimination called "pre-employment screening" use the greatest form of discrimination ever such as "lack of experience." However, keep the faith and keep trying. I will!

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cha cha in Los Angeles, California

34 months ago

I graduated with a Masters at a prestigious university last June and I STILL CANT FIND A JOB so don't feel bad! It's CRAZY discouraging. Dyin' here!

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Beth in Dallas, TX

33 months ago

I make $45,000 with an Associates degree so I really can't complain. The student school loan debt bubble is about to explode with so many kids having to repay student loans with no job. And if they find a job its usually low paying.

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Bluetea in Texas

33 months ago

cha cha in Los Angeles, California said: I graduated with a Masters at a prestigious university last June and I STILL CANT FIND A JOB so don't feel bad! It's CRAZY discouraging. Dyin' here!

Another testament to the failure of higher education.

I have had more luck finding jobs after taking the Master's degree off my resume. Who knew? Heh!

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Nanlisa in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania

33 months ago

Paige in Eagle Bridge, New York said: This doesn't help because "the times have changed" but when I first graduated I eked out a living getting typing, data entry and transcription jobs here and there. That was back in the good ol'days when agencies would give me the time of day. Those were Kelly and Manpower and a few others. Fat lot of good that does these days, though.

If you can stomach telemarketing.....of course, that's drying up too.

You said it Paige. I've done telemarketing before and the Do-Not-Call list has simply put a lot of these telemarketing outfits out of business. And you're definitely right about these office jobs. Office jobs have disappeared over the last several years; mainly due to automation. I've gone to a few places where they don't even have a receptionist! I also heard that some managers now do their own clerical work. Therefore they don't need anybody to do their typing and so on. Transcription is also an obsolete skill as well.

I clearly can't stress this, but most of the jobs today are in health care, and that's the bottom line.

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Average in Everett, Massachusetts

33 months ago

hoapres in San Francisco, California said: The problem with the statement "Most of the jobs today are in health care" is the vast number of people in the last couple of years that are trying to enter the "booming medical field" resulting in LOTS of new nursing and other medical field graduates unable to find jobs.[/QUOTA]
I don't know if that's true EVERYWHERE. In Middle america, where population is decling perhaps that is true, but on the East Coast, everyone I know who obtained a nursing degree is working and has options your I.T. worker, or typical knowledge worker could only dream of. This isn't to say that they have many options, but more than average. One of my instructors said that a BSN is the most versatile degree.

Four years ago or longer I remember reading that in the future the most common occupation will be "Nurse" throughout the world. As poor countries become more wealthy, the birth rate goes down and people begin to live longer and longer this looks like that will be the case but that process will take a while given the large populations in the poorer countries,the widespread poverty that remains in those countries, and resource bottlenecks that keep them from getting wealthy as fast as they'd like.

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Beth in Dallas, TX

33 months ago

Lots of hospitals are having a hiring freeze due to decrease in Medicare reimbursement from the government. My brother is a nurse and works at a VA hospital and they will not hire any nurses when one leaves (transfer) or retires. Even the VA is cutting back on staff and allows overtime on rare occasions. For profit and nonprofit hospitals are really hurting with so many uninsured folks using the ER as their primary source for healthcare.... whether its the flu, tooth ache, or feeling depressed.

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Zel in New Windsor, New York

33 months ago

ShaneD in San Antonio, Texas said: I got my bachelors degree 2 years ago and have been working various 8 dollar an hour, and attempted to but failed at starting 3 different businesses. Congrats, you fell into the biggest scam of our lifetime, the student loan/ college trap. All you life people been telling you "go to college so you can get a good job and have all the nice things you want!". Take a look back and you will realize 90 percent of those people have never been to college. they just regurgitate what they hear over and over again till they believe it.

This is one smart answer, totally true. But now what? We're all stuck... :(

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John in Catonsville, Maryland

33 months ago

Education is important up to a certain point. No, we do not want a country full of undereducated, but, there is a flip side to the story. I know a director of a museum who claims that with the number of educated people out there (especially in this economy), he can hire a PHD for pennies on the dollar. Do the people actually need the PHD for the position? Likely not if they have a brain cell or two left. But, with the sheer number of educated people out there, degrees just don't hold the value they once did.

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Bluetea in Texas

33 months ago

hoapres in San Francisco, California said: Positions that don't need a college degree now do as the employers are using college as an expensive and unwarranted aptitude test.

Its a filter. George Washington was a high school dropout.

As my ol' grandma use to say, "Tha'ngs be different nowadays".

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Average in Everett, Massachusetts

33 months ago

Bluetea in Texas said: Its a filter.

It's more than a filter. It's a transfer of wealth. For the privilege of bestowing education they , even though most former students will tell you that most of the actual learning occurs outside the classroom, the schools and the banking institutions associated with them have a claim on future earnings. Every time tuition goes up and wages don't, the schools and banks can claim more of a future graduate's future earnings.

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nick in Somerville, Massachusetts

33 months ago

I know what they say about Communications degrees, but I managed a 3.8 GPA for mine, and was buzzed off alcohol 90% of my waking hours. What's the use of an "education" where I can ace classes on half the brain cells as everyone else has?

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Bluetea in Texas

33 months ago

Average in Everett, Massachusetts said: It's more than a filter. It's a transfer of wealth. For the privilege of bestowing education they , even though most former students will tell you that most of the actual learning occurs outside the classroom, the schools and the banking institutions associated with them have a claim on future earnings. Every time tuition goes up and wages don't, the schools and banks can claim more of a future graduate's future earnings.

Student Debt is what now, 800 billion? WWII didn't cost that much.

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nick in Somerville, Massachusetts

33 months ago

People going to 25k+ a year schools for "general studies" sure doesn't help that number. If you're in a useless degree and you know it clap your hands...and then go to vo tech and learn something you may actually get paid for one day.

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Ryan in Yorba Linda, California

33 months ago

Jennifer in Los Angeles, California said: So, I just graduated and can't find a job.

I'm just SUPER frustrated, I was active on campus, I did a lot I worked with so many people, students, staff. Now I'm back at home and I'm having the most difficult time finding a job. I honestly don't even know what to do, filling out all these applications discourages me. I know the job market bites, but MY GOODNESS.. I'm just frustrated and I know I'm special - I know that might sound cocky but I feel like I'm a diamond that got thrown under some dusty tables in a thrift shop.

Graduation was a fun time, but in the back of my head I was really thinking of how bleak it was here in the "real world" as far as the job market goes.

Does anyone else feel this way? Am I crazy? What advice would you give me?

It's just so frustrating, I don't want my talents and skill and my willingness to learn to just go to waste .. to just atrophy and die. =_=; Because that's what it feels like!

I've had the same problem. I graduated nearly four years ago. I got a job at home depot shortly after I graduated, but didn't consider it as a career option. I spent my free time filling out applications to hundreds of companies and my only interviews turned out to be some kind of pyramid scheme. Who knew sports marketing was selling direct tv door to door. I'm currently starting a small business and I hope that works. If it doesn't then I'll have to reconsider things. I have worked small low-level jobs along with my home depot job over the past four years, bank teller, bouncer, Hs football coach etc.

However, I have come to the realization that the best thing that I (and likely you and many in a similar situation) can do is to accept that college was a complete waste of time. First, just get a job that you know you can get, usually retail/restaurant. I would recommend doing some research and finding a good company to work for. Personally, if my small business doesn’t w

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Hallie in Ann Arbor, Michigan

33 months ago

I am feeling the same way. I worked very hard to graduate early ( I just graduated in December). I was a college athlete and have had three different internships within my field of study (Human Resources). I have been called for a number of interviews and 2nd interviews, interviewers have told me things like "You're a very strong candidate", "You present yourself very well", and "I can see you being very successful here". And somehow, I still have not landed the job. So what gives?

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Average in Everett, Massachusetts

33 months ago

hoapres in San Jose, California said: It's simple.

We have too many people looking for too few jobs.


I don't think too many people can accept the "too many people" part.
www.helium.com/debates/333506-is-overpopulation-partially-responsible-for-the-economic-crisis/side_by_side

People turn it into an Us vs Them issue. "Too many blacks". "too many Muslims" "too many Christians" ""too many dumb people" " Too many lazy people" too many wimpy men" etc etc. even if specifications are not made in argument that there are "too many people", people turn it into an argument that there are just too many of the wrong kind of people.

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abeedle in Salem, Virginia

33 months ago

Getting started is never easy - but we're also conditioned to seeing certain kinds of "jobs" as inherently better than others and, in a sense, waiting for employers to tell us that we're okay. The problem is really the entire notion of college. We've been sold on this idea that "college is the answer to all of our problems", but then we end up in debt and "learning" things that have no bearing on whether or not we can make a living. I mean, 'Jane Eyre' is a great book and all, but seriously?

My advice -- for what it's worth -- is to start thinking about yourself as a 'company' and figure out what you're capable of and then figure out how to start generating at least a little cash. My daughter has focused on childcare. She likes it and is good at it and has thought it through like a business. She currently "nannies" for three families and gets paid $15.00/hour. She does this while she looks for other, more growth oriented options.

I have a PhD -- but I waited tables for quite a while because I enjoyed it and was reasonably good at it. It also gave me the freedom to work on projects I cared about without the BS that comes with a faculty position. It was a short-term solution, but my point is simply that it is YOUR life, not an employers... Figure out what you want and organize your life around achieving those things.

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David Hilditch in Edinburgh, United Kingdom

33 months ago

I definitely agree. I think it's tougher for people in the U.S because college is so expensive and you end up with so much debt but if you're currently at college/university then you should already be trying to work on something which can support you after you graduate.

1. Try and minimise your debt as much as you can by working whilst you study.
2. Try, if possible, to work on something related to your field
3. If you can't find something which pays money that's related to your field, offer your services for free to a local, small company for a few hours per week - they'll appreciate it and it'll boost your CV.
4. If you've already graduated and are stuck looking for work, you really need to figure out what makes you stand out from the crowd. e.g. Hallie from Michigan, that sounds great that you were a college athlete and there are some transferable skills there to Human Resources roles, but maybe there's some other stuff you've done whilst at college or in your own time that you can use to make your CV stand out? If not, maybe there are people you know in businesses who are hiring and you could help them find their new hire for them? Approach them with a no-risk strategy - i.e. tell them you'll help them find someone but if you don't successfully find someone for them you don't get paid. I'm sure there's other stuff you could think of around this area to help you get *some* money coming in but importantly to help your CV stand out far more in future.

Employers want to see drive, enthusiasm and a willingness to succeed and if college graduates are solely relying on the fact that they got a degree then it simply doesn't come across as well as some other person who also got the degree but also has been working independently to further their skills in practice and in the field.

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Average in Everett, Massachusetts

33 months ago

David Hilditch in Edinburgh, United Kingdom said:

Employers want to see drive, enthusiasm and a willingness to succeed and if college graduates are solely relying on the fact that they got a degree then it simply doesn't come across as well as some other person who also got the degree but also has been working independently to further their skills in practice and in the field.

Not everyone is capable of doing internships while attending a full time program. This not a matter of drive, enthusiasm, or a willingness to succeed. There are serious disparities in the energy, work pace and time management among students. Those who are above average in abilities stand out. Those who aren't don't.

hoapres in San Mateo, California said: We have too many people.

It really is that simple.

While it won't happen, a simple draconian deportation of immigrants be it legal or illegal for work purposes solves the problem.

Humanitarian issues aside, we imported over 1 million guest workers on H1B Visas in the past 10 years along with sanctioning the use of "illegal" immigrants.

The rate of growth does not support the importation of more workers at the current rate.

Don't get me wrong, I agree with you. It's just that the that majority of the public don't.

The countries where immigrants come from have too many people. Since most of them embrace capitalism we're still going to be competing with them one way or the other.

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Jimmy in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

33 months ago

hoapres in San Mateo, California said: It really is that simple.

We have too many people competing for too few jobs.

Yep and sooooo many kids are in for a big shock when they can't find a job and have all those student loans to pay back.

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JTJ1977 in Davenport, Iowa

33 months ago

However, I have come to the realization that the best thing that I (and likely you and many in a similar situation) can do is to accept that college was a complete waste of time. First, just get a job that you know you can get, usually retail/restaurant. I would recommend doing some research and finding a good company to work for. Personally, if my small business doesn’t w

Amen to all of this. And might I suggest that if someone really wants an "education", to stick with the trades, education, or STEM fields (sciences/technology/engineering/mathematics), because there aren't many companies tripping over each other to hire folks with political science, history and Greek Studies degrees (FWIW, I have a useless Political Science degree and still cannot find work even with government agencies).

It almost feels like one big ponzi scheme. If I could turn back the hands of time (circa 2000), I would've worked from the bottom up at some company, earned a tech degree (health/drafting), and transitioned into a decent career with decent wages and benefits.

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Yep in Cedar Rapids, Iowa

33 months ago

The other thing that no one tells people about STEM fields is that job prospects are grim with just a B.S. Degree, you need at least a masters or a Phd to do anything in the sciences.

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ATLeastYouDidn'tMajorinFashionDesign in Greensboro, North Carolina

33 months ago

At least you all didn't major in fashion design. Yep, when I was 18 I thought I wanted to be a fashion designer. Dumb kid I was, I didn't realize that I'd hate this type of work until I was 20 and doing my first internship. Well hate it is an understatement.

Now I am doing everything within my power to land any type of full time work. I can't even get one interview for any type of job. I've been looking, networking, applying, and informational interviewing for 5 months so far, and I graduate in May.

To make matters worse, no one has any advice for me. I have a good resume, write solid cover letters, and am doing informational interviews/networking. Everyone just says "hang in there" or "don't stress because it's out of your control".

The stress of my inability to find work is causing my long term and long distance relationship to crumble, and in a few months, when his temp position ends, I really don't know how we will deal with both of us being so stressed out. I am just so sad and stressed out all the time over this. All things considered, I have a great life and am blessed to have a part time job that is tolerable right now. But, I can't work retail for the rest of my life. I'm just not sure what to do...I am starting to worry that even finding a temp position will be impossible.

Right now my only lead is an unpaid internship. FML. I'm graduating summa cum laude and I have continuous work history...and I'm probably going to go back to community college. UGH.

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Shiloh Litton in Salisbury, Maryland

33 months ago

To all of you. I know first hand how discouraging it can be out there. It took me 2 years to find my job after graduating. The bottom line is to that you have to be creative. The traditional way of apply then wait doesn't work anymore. Apply, then send a hard copy of your CV to the person who is actually doing the hiring. Then call to follow up and touch bases. Don't be afraid to call them to set something up. If that doesn't work, then think of other ways to get your face out there and make your education work for you. Sometimes a new strategy is in order and you have to think outside the box. Even if it's a position you don't really want, but it will get your foot in the door so you can work toward the position you really do deserve. Good luck to you all. I've been there.

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Brian Jacobson in Pompano Beach, Florida

31 months ago

I can sympathize with most but it is just the economy and the way business is these days. The number one thing to realize is that it has nothing to do with you yourself first and foremost. I graduated in may 2011 and was one of the lucky ones that had a job the day after graduation. However, it was cold calling and it was brutal but the money was decent. Unfortunately the beast that is with cold calling sales caught up to me and shortly there after I was let go from the company I had been with for the last 7 months. I realized then though its not about what you do right after college and how much money one can make, but what experiences in your field you can receive and learn from right after. Let's face it, if we were 35 and had 10 years of experience, were most likely going to get looked at before the twenty something year old that has 2 or 3 years of experience and is green like most of us that are on this post. So go out, find jobs but more importantly a career that you can love and can excel at. Eventually it will all fall into place for all of us. Good luck to everyone on here, I know we will all do great.

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Brian Jacobson in Pompano Beach, Florida

31 months ago

I would also like to add that working your social media sites like Twitter, LinkedIN, and yes even Facebook if the page is professional enough can lead to finding some great employment opportunities. While I do not currently work full time, I do work on a part time basis in the field of business development and marketing and I heavily rely on social media platforms to do my job but to also look for new employment as well. These are some excellent tools to see what is out there but also to connect with people that have been in the industry that your are looking for as well. Plus, make sure your resume is a "rock star". I unfortunately have had my resume kicked to the curb many times for simple errors such as spelling, grammar, and sentence structure. Also layout seems to be very important as well. Make sure that these mistakes are fixed and check multiple times before sending these out. This is really the first impression one can make on any employer as well. Hope my advice helps someone out on here. Again, best of luck to all.

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Brian Jacobson in Pompano Beach, Florida

31 months ago

In essence, you are not alone. There are millions all over the U.S. who are in the mid twenties wondering, did I do the wrong thing by going to school. I can assure that we did not. It just takes time, which I know some people like myself do not want to wait, but thats what it is these days. I to have been very down on myself over the past year since graduating, but I then realize this is not the way to get ahead and get that great job. Just stay positive, love life, take a break once and a while, and keep at it. Eventually our time will come in this job market.

Jennifer in Los Angeles, California said: So, I just graduated and can't find a job.

I'm just SUPER frustrated, I was active on campus, I did a lot I worked with so many people, students, staff. Now I'm back at home and I'm having the most difficult time finding a job. I honestly don't even know what to do, filling out all these applications discourages me. I know the job market bites, but MY GOODNESS.. I'm just frustrated and I know I'm special - I know that might sound cocky but I feel like I'm a diamond that got thrown under some dusty tables in a thrift shop.

Graduation was a fun time, but in the back of my head I was really thinking of how bleak it was here in the "real world" as far as the job market goes.

Does anyone else feel this way? Am I crazy? What advice would you give me?

It's just so frustrating, I don't want my talents and skill and my willingness to learn to just go to waste .. to just atrophy and die. =_=; Because that's what it feels like!

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Nick in Somerville, Massachusetts

31 months ago

^ We need several major changes to our government and business practices, before "our time will come" in this job market.

So long as companies are not penalized for going overseas for their labor, they will continue to do so as much as they can. Think about all the people Apple alone could employ, if they were here instead of making slaves in other countries work in pee-poor working conditions. Someone allows them (and TONS of other companies) to get away with this. That's why we can't find jobs...they aren't here.

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