Go back for another Associate's or no?

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Comments (12)

LeAnna Shanks in Buffalo, New York

20 months ago

I have a Bachelor's degree but no relevant job experience for the field I'm interested in. Would it be worth it to go back to a community college for a somewhat relevant degree just so I could have the free time to volunteer/intern for experience during the day? I understand I'd be in more student loan debt, but with a full and part-time job taking up most of my time to pay bills, I'm lost for answers. Advice?

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catfish503 in portland, Oregon

20 months ago

LeAnna Shanks in Buffalo, New York said: I have a Bachelor's degree but no relevant job experience for the field I'm interested in. Would it be worth it to go back to a community college for a somewhat relevant degree just so I could have the free time to volunteer/intern for experience during the day? I understand I'd be in more student loan debt, but with a full and part-time job taking up most of my time to pay bills, I'm lost for answers. Advice?

I would think it depends on what community college degree your looking at...I'm not sure what you mean by you would have free time to volunteer/intern, but full & part-time job takes up most of your time to pay bills. If you need to work would you be quitting your job(s) to go back to school? =)

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Experienced Seeker in Schaumburg, Illinois

20 months ago

I don't think it makes any sense to get an Associates if you already have a Bachelor's, unless you are just interested in the specific skills.... employers tend to look at the highest degree you earned, not the order in which you earned them.

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Unix Brat in Asheville, North Carolina

20 months ago

Experienced Seeker in Schaumburg, Illinois said: I don't think it makes any sense to get an Associates if you already have a Bachelor's, unless you are just interested in the specific skills.... employers tend to look at the highest degree you earned, not the order in which you earned them.

I disagree. This has not been the case for me. I earned 2 AAS's after getting a Bachelor's degree. My AAS's have gotten me jobs.

I say the OP should go for it if the program is decent.

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LeAnna Shanks in Buffalo, New York

19 months ago

catfish503 in portland, Oregon said: I would think it depends on what community college degree your looking at...I'm not sure what you mean by you would have free time to volunteer/intern, but full & part-time job takes up most of your time to pay bills. If you need to work would you be quitting your job(s) to go back to school? =)

I would be working two part-time jobs instead of a full-time and part-time.

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Bluetea in Texas

19 months ago

Experienced Seeker in Schaumburg, Illinois said: I don't think it makes any sense to get an Associates if you already have a Bachelor's, unless you are just interested in the specific skills.... employers tend to look at the highest degree you earned, not the order in which you earned them.

My niece is a hair stylist and she told me that private beauty school is now 20K! When I was in high school, it was $500.

One thing that is adding to the high cost is that many people going to cosmetology school now have worthless college degrees.

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Riot in Ware, Massachusetts

19 months ago

There can be some benefit to earning an Associate's Degree after a Bachelor's if your intent is to completely switch fields. If you want to do this, the Associate's Degree should be something specific, and ideally in a technical field and/or a field that requires a certification that the new degree will qualify you for. Generally, these types of degrees are the ones that Unix Brat mentioned, AAS (Associate's of Applied Science).

If you don't really want to switch fields, or the Associate's is either in liberal arts or a technical field that is saturated (such as Radiologic Technology seems to be), then you're not likely to benefit. It might help our advice if you mention what your Bachelor's is in and what you intend to do for an Associate's.

Good Luck!

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LeAnna Shanks in Buffalo, New York

19 months ago

Riot in Ware, Massachusetts said: There can be some benefit to earning an Associate's Degree after a Bachelor's if your intent is to completely switch fields. If you want to do this, the Associate's Degree should be something specific, and ideally in a technical field and/or a field that requires a certification that the new degree will qualify you for. Generally, these types of degrees are the ones that Unix Brat mentioned, AAS (Associate's of Applied Science).

If you don't really want to switch fields, or the Associate's is either in liberal arts or a technical field that is saturated (such as Radiologic Technology seems to be), then you're not likely to benefit. It might help our advice if you mention what your Bachelor's is in and what you intend to do for an Associate's.

Good Luck!

My Bachelor's is in English and I intend to go for Business Administration. I'm hoping to become a Grant Writer. However, as I said, with working a full time and part time job, I have no time to volunteer/intern. If I go back for an Associate's degree, I will have time during the day to volunteer/intern which is basically prerequisite to finding a job in the non-profit sector doing grant writing.

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Unix Brat in Asheville, North Carolina

19 months ago

Riot in Ware, Massachusetts said: or the Associate's is either in liberal arts or a ... field that is saturated ...then you're not likely to benefit. It might help our advice if you mention what your Bachelor's is in and what you intend to do for an Associate's.

Good thing you fleshed this out.....

LeAnna Shanks in Buffalo, New York said: My Bachelor's is in English and I intend to go for Business Administration. I'm hoping to become a Grant Writer. However, as I said, with working a full time and part time job, I have no time to volunteer/intern. If I go back for an Associate's degree, I will have time during the day to volunteer/intern which is basically prerequisite to finding a job in the non-profit sector doing grant writing.

Business Administration degrees are a dime a dozen.

As far as grant writing, I don't think you should go through great lengths to learn how to write one. Workshops are offered for free if you look around (ie your public library).

If it were me, I would jump right in and start applying to places looking for grant writers. Your BA in English will be proof that you know how to write decently. Just do some independent research on non-profits so you can talk their lingo during an interview.

Best of luck.

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Riot in Ware, Massachusetts

19 months ago

If you go back to school, you'll have to drop one or both jobs and still support yourself, no? Why not just drop that job anyway and spend more time volunteering and save yourself the tuition money? I wouldn't go back for an Associate's if I were in your position. I think that's only a good path if your intended Associate's is seen as an absolute requirement for the position you are seeking.

I agree with Unix Brat that you should just start applying for grant writer positions, but also add that maybe you can apply to other positions at non-profits and work your way into a grant writer role. I would guess that the third best option would be to try to find a job that can replace your current two jobs in a normal-ish work week in order to free up time to volunteer more.

Good Luck!

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Calfornian in Hayward, California

19 months ago

I can see, and I've thought about, going back for a certificate in a specific niche like statistics or something similar with math.

Absent that I think you be better off at a state college going for a MBA. You can do it in the evenings and it probably wouldn't take more than a couple of years if you pushed it.

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LeAnna Shanks in Buffalo, New York

19 months ago

If I went back for an Associate's, the Federal loans would pay for my rent for two years and allow me to work less and volunteer/intern more. That's my reasoning. Otherwise, I'm still stuck with paying rent. My current two jobs do not afford me time to volunteer outside work, except one night a week but I only do cat cage cleaning and enrichment.

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